changed trustdb design
[gnupg.git] / doc / DETAILS
1
2
3     * For packet version 3 we calculate the keyids this way:
4         RSA     := low 64 bits of n
5         ELGAMAL := build a v3 pubkey packet (with CTB 0x99) and calculate
6                    a rmd160 hash value from it. This is used as the
7                    fingerprint and the low 64 bits are the keyid.
8
9     * Revocation certificates consist only of the signature packet;
10       "import" knows how to handle this.  The rationale behind it is
11       to keep them small.
12
13
14     Key generation shows progress by printing different characters to
15     stderr:
16              "."  Last 10 Miller-Rabin tests failed
17              "+"  Miller-Rabin test succeeded
18              "!"  Reloading the pool with fresh prime numbers
19              "^"  Checking a new value for the generator
20              "<"  Size of one factor decreased
21              ">"  Size of one factor increased
22
23     The prime number for ElGamal is generated this way:
24
25     1) Make a prime number q of 160, 200, 240 bits (depending on the keysize)
26     2) Select the length of the other prime factors to be at least the size
27        of q and calculate the number of prime factors needed
28     3) Make a pool of prime numbers, each of the length determined in step 2
29     4) Get a new permutation out of the pool or continue with step 3
30        if we have tested all permutations.
31     5) Calculate a candidate prime p = 2 * q * p[1] * ... * p[n] + 1
32     6) Check that this prime has the correct length (this may change q if
33        it seems not to be possible to make a prime of the desired length)
34     7) Check whether this is a prime using trial divisions and the
35        Miller-Rabin test.
36     8) Continue with step 4 if we did not find a prime in step 7.
37     9) Find a generator for that prime.
38
39
40
41
42 Layout of the TrustDB
43 =====================
44 FIXME: use a directory record as top node instead of the pubkey record
45
46 The TrustDB is built from fixed length records, where the first byte
47 describes the record type.  All numeric values are stored in network
48 byte order. The length of each record is 40 bytes. The first record of
49 the DB is always of type 1 and this is the only record of this type.
50
51 Record type 0:
52 --------------
53     Unused record, can be reused for any purpose.
54
55 Record type 1:
56 --------------
57     Version information for this TrustDB.  This is always the first
58     record of the DB and the only one with type 1.
59      1 byte value 2
60      3 bytes 'gpg'  magic value
61      1 byte Version of the TrustDB
62      3 byte reserved
63      1 u32  locked by (pid) 0 = not locked.
64      1 u32  timestamp of trustdb creation
65      1 u32  timestamp of last modification
66      1 u32  timestamp of last validation
67             (Used to keep track of the time, when this TrustDB was checked
68              against the pubring)
69      1 u32  reserved
70      1 byte marginals needed
71      1 byte completes needed
72      1 byte max. cert depth
73             If any of this 3 values are changed, all cache records
74             must be invalidated.
75      9 bytes reserved
76
77
78 Record type 2: (directory record)
79 --------------
80     Informations about a public key certificate.
81     These are static values which are never changed without user interaction.
82
83      1 byte value 2
84      1 byte  reserved
85      1 u32   LID     .  (This is simply the record number of this record.)
86      1 u32   List of key-records (the first one is the primary key)
87      1 u32   List of uid-records
88      1 u32   cache record
89      1 byte  ownertrust
90      1 byte  sigflag
91     20 byte reserved
92
93
94 Record type 3:  (key record)
95 --------------
96     Informations about a primary public key.
97     (This is mainly used to lookup a trust record)
98
99      1 byte value 3
100      1 byte  reserved
101      1 u32   LID
102      1 u32   next   - next key record
103      7 bytes reserved
104      1 byte  keyflags
105      1 byte  pubkey algorithm
106      1 byte  length of the fingerprint (in bytes)
107      20 bytes fingerprint of the public key
108               (This is the value we use to identify a key)
109
110 Record type 4: (uid record)
111 --------------
112     Informations about a userid
113     We do not store the userid but the hash value of the userid because that
114     is sufficient.
115
116      1 byte value 4
117      1 byte reserved
118      1 u32  LID  points to the directory record.
119      1 u32  next   next userid
120      1 u32  pointer to preference record
121      1 u32  siglist  list of valid signatures
122      1 byte uidflags
123      1 byte reserved
124      20 bytes ripemd160 hash of the username.
125
126
127 Record type 5: (pref record)
128 --------------
129     Informations about preferences
130
131      1 byte value 5
132      1 byte   reserved
133      1 u32  LID; points to the directory record (and not to the uid record!).
134             (or 0 for standard preference record)
135      1 u32  next
136
137 Record type 6  (sigrec)
138 -------------
139     Used to keep track of valid key signatures. Self-signatures are not
140     stored.
141
142      1 byte   value 6
143      1 byte   reserved
144      1 u32    LID           points back to the dir record
145      1 u32    next   next sigrec of this owner or 0 to indicate the
146                      last sigrec.
147      6 times
148         1 u32  Local_id of signators dir record
149         1 byte reserved
150
151
152
153 Record type 9:  (cache record)
154 --------------
155     Used to bind the trustDB to the concrete instance of keyblock in
156     a pubring. This is used to cache information.
157
158      1 byte   value 9
159      1 byte   reserved
160      1 u32    Local-Id.
161      8 bytes  keyid of the primary key (needed?)
162      1 byte   cache-is-valid the following stuff is only
163               valid if this is set.
164      1 byte   reserved
165      20 bytes rmd160 hash value over the complete keyblock
166               This is used to detect any changes of the keyblock with all
167               CTBs and lengths headers. Calculation is easy if the keyblock
168               is optained from a keyserver: simply create the hash from all
169               received data bytes.
170
171      1 byte   number of untrusted signatures.
172      1 byte   number of marginal trusted signatures.
173      1 byte   number of fully trusted signatures.
174               (255 is stored for all values greater than 254)
175      1 byte   Trustlevel
176                 0 = undefined (not calculated)
177                 1 = unknown
178                 2 = not trusted
179                 3 = marginally trusted
180                 4 = fully trusted
181                 5 = ultimately trusted (have secret key too).
182
183
184 Record Type 10 (hash table)
185 --------------
186     Due to the fact that we use the keyid to lookup keys, we can
187     implement quick access by some simple hash methods, and avoid
188     the overhead of gdbm.  A property of keyids is that they can be
189     used directly as hash values.  (They can be considered as strong
190     random numbers.)
191       What we use is a dynamic multilevel architecture, which combines
192     hashtables, record lists, and linked lists.
193
194     This record is a hashtable of 256 entries; a special property
195     is that all these records are stored consecutively to make one
196     big table. The hash value is simple the 1st, 2nd, ... byte of
197     the keyid (depending on the indirection level).
198
199      1 byte value 10
200      1 byte reserved
201      n u32  recnum; n depends on th record length:
202             n = (reclen-2)/4  which yields 9 for the current record length
203             of 40 bytes.
204
205     the total number of surch record which makes up the table is:
206          m = (256+n-1) / n
207     which is 29 for a record length of 40.
208
209     To look up a key we use its lsb to get the recnum from this
210     hashtable and look up the addressed record:
211        - If this record is another hashtable, we use 2nd lsb
212          to index this hast table and so on.
213        - if this record is a hashlist, we walk thru the
214          reclist records until we found one whose hash field
215          matches the MSB of our keyid, and lookup this record
216        - if this record is a dir record, we compare the
217          keyid and if this is correct, we get the keyrecod and compare
218          the fingerprint to decide whether it is the requested key;
219          if this is not the correct dir record, we look at the next
220          dir record which is linked by the link field.
221
222 Record type 11 (hash list)
223 --------------
224     see hash table for an explanation.
225
226     1 byte value 11
227     1 byte reserved
228     1 u32  next          next hash list record
229     n times              n = (reclen-6)/5
230         1 byte hash
231         1 u32  recnum
232
233     For the current record length of 40, n is 6
234
235
236
237 Packet Headers
238 ===============
239
240 GNUPG uses PGP 2 packet headers and also understands OpenPGP packet header.
241 There is one enhancement used with the old style packet headers:
242
243    CTB bits 10, the "packet-length length bits", have values listed in
244    the following table:
245
246       00 - 1-byte packet-length field
247       01 - 2-byte packet-length field
248       10 - 4-byte packet-length field
249       11 - no packet length supplied, unknown packet length
250
251    As indicated in this table, depending on the packet-length length
252    bits, the remaining 1, 2, 4, or 0 bytes of the packet structure field
253    are a "packet-length field".  The packet-length field is a whole
254    number field.  The value of the packet-length field is defined to be
255    the value of the whole number field.
256
257    A value of 11 is currently used in one place: on compressed data.
258    That is, a compressed data block currently looks like <A3 01 . .  .>,
259    where <A3>, binary 10 1000 11, is an indefinite-length packet. The
260    proper interpretation is "until the end of the enclosing structure",
261    although it should never appear outermost (where the enclosing
262    structure is a file).
263
264 +  This will be changed with another version, where the new meaning of
265 +  the value 11 (see below) will also take place.
266 +
267 +  A value of 11 for other packets enables a special length encoding,
268 +  which is used in case, where the length of the following packet can
269 +  not be determined prior to writing the packet; especially this will
270 +  be used if large amounts of data are processed in filter mode.
271 +
272 +  It works like this: After the CTB (with a length field of 11) a
273 +  marker field is used, which gives the length of the following datablock.
274 +  This is a simple 2 byte field (MSB first) containig the amount of data
275 +  following this field, not including this length field. After this datablock
276 +  another length field follows, which gives the size of the next datablock.
277 +  A value of 0 indicates the end of the packet. The maximum size of a
278 +  data block is limited to 65534, thereby reserving a value of 0xffff for
279 +  future extensions. These length markers must be insereted into the data
280 +  stream just before writing the data out.
281 +
282 +  This 2 byte filed is large enough, because the application must buffer
283 +  this amount of data to prepend the length marker before writing it out.
284 +  Data block sizes larger than about 32k doesn't make any sense. Note
285 +  that this may also be used for compressed data streams, but we must use
286 +  another packet version to tell the application that it can not assume,
287 +  that this is the last packet.
288
289
290
291
292
293
294
295 Keyserver Message Format
296 -------------------------
297
298 The keyserver may be contacted by a Unix Domain socket or via TCP.
299
300 The format of a request is:
301
302 ----
303 command-tag
304 "Content-length:" digits
305 CRLF
306 ------
307
308 Where command-tag is
309
310 NOOP
311 GET <user-name>
312 PUT
313 DELETE <user-name>
314
315
316 The format of a response is:
317
318 ------
319 "GNUPG/1.0" status-code status-text
320 "Content-length:" digits
321 CRLF
322 ------------
323 followed by <digits> bytes of data
324
325
326 Status codes are:
327
328      o  1xx: Informational - Request received, continuing process
329
330      o  2xx: Success - The action was successfully received, understood,
331         and accepted
332
333      o  4xx: Client Error - The request contains bad syntax or cannot be
334         fulfilled
335
336      o  5xx: Server Error - The server failed to fulfill an apparently
337         valid request
338
339
340
341 Ich werde jetzt doch das HKP Protokoll implementieren:
342
343 Naja, die Doku ist so gut wie nichtexistent, da gebe ich Dir recht.
344 In kurzen Worten:
345
346 (Minimal-)HTTP-Server auf Port 11371, versteht ein GET auf /pks/lookup,
347 wobei die Query-Parameter (Key-Value-Paare mit = zwischen Key und
348 Value; die Paare sind hinter ? und durch & getrennt). Gültige
349 Operationen sind:
350
351 - - op (Operation) mit den Möglichkeiten index (gleich wie -kv bei
352   PGP), vindex (-kvv) und get (-kxa)
353 - - search: Liste der Worte, die im Key vorkommen müssen. Worte sind
354   mit Worttrennzeichen wie Space, Punkt, @, ... getrennt, Worttrennzeichen
355   werden nicht betrachtet, die Reihenfolge der Worte ist egal.
356 - - exact: (on=aktiv, alles andere inaktiv) Nur die Schlüssel
357   zurückgeben, die auch den "search"-String beinhalten (d.h.
358   Wortreihenfolge und Sonderzeichen sind wichtig)
359 - - fingerprint (Bei [v]index auch den Fingerprint ausgeben), "on"
360   für aktiv, alles andere inaktiv
361
362 Neu (wird von GNUPG benutzt):
363    /pks/lookup/<gnupg_formatierte_user_id>?op=<operation>
364
365 Zusätzlich versteht der Keyserver auch ein POST auf /pks/add, womit
366 man Keys hochladen kann.
367