Include intl/ in the CVS again; otherwise we are not able to
[gnupg.git] / doc / DETAILS
1
2 Format of colon listings
3 ========================
4 First an example:
5
6 $ gpg --fixed-list-mode --with-colons --list-keys \
7    --with-fingerprint --with-fingerprint wk@gnupg.org
8
9 pub:f:1024:17:6C7EE1B8621CC013:899817715:1055898235::m:::scESC:
10 fpr:::::::::ECAF7590EB3443B5C7CF3ACB6C7EE1B8621CC013:
11 uid:f::::::::Werner Koch <wk@g10code.com>:
12 uid:f::::::::Werner Koch <wk@gnupg.org>:
13 sub:f:1536:16:06AD222CADF6A6E1:919537416:1036177416:::::e:
14 fpr:::::::::CF8BCC4B18DE08FCD8A1615906AD222CADF6A6E1:
15 sub:r:1536:20:5CE086B5B5A18FF4:899817788:1025961788:::::esc:
16 fpr:::::::::AB059359A3B81F410FCFF97F5CE086B5B5A18FF4:
17
18 The double --with-fingerprint prints the fingerprint for the subkeys
19 too, --fixed-list-mode is themodern listing way printing dates in
20 seconds since Epoch and does not merge the first userID with the pub
21 record.
22
23
24  1. Field:  Type of record
25             pub = public key
26             crt = X.509 certificate
27             crs = X.509 certificate and private key available
28             sub = subkey (secondary key)
29             sec = secret key
30             ssb = secret subkey (secondary key)
31             uid = user id (only field 10 is used).
32             uat = user attribute (same as user id except for field 10).
33             sig = signature
34             rev = revocation signature
35             fpr = fingerprint: (fingerprint is in field 10)
36             pkd = public key data (special field format, see below)
37             grp = reserved for gpgsm
38             rvk = revocation key
39
40  2. Field:  A letter describing the calculated trust. This is a single
41             letter, but be prepared that additional information may follow
42             in some future versions. (not used for secret keys)
43                 o = Unknown (this key is new to the system)
44                 i = The key is invalid (e.g. due to a missing self-signature)
45                 d = The key has been disabled
46                 r = The key has been revoked
47                 e = The key has expired
48                 - = Unknown trust (i.e. no value assigned)
49                 q = Undefined trust
50                     '-' and 'q' may safely be treated as the same
51                     value for most purposes
52                 n = Don't trust this key at all
53                 m = There is marginal trust in this key
54                 f = The key is full trusted.
55                 u = The key is ultimately trusted; this is only used for
56                     keys for which the secret key is also available.
57  3. Field:  length of key in bits.
58  4. Field:  Algorithm:  1 = RSA
59                        16 = ElGamal (encrypt only)
60                        17 = DSA (sometimes called DH, sign only)
61                        20 = ElGamal (sign and encrypt)
62             (for other id's see include/cipher.h)
63  5. Field:  KeyID either of 
64  6. Field:  Creation Date (in UTC)
65  7. Field:  Key expiration date or empty if none.
66  8. Field:  Used for serial number in crt records (used to be the Local-ID)
67  9. Field:  Ownertrust (primary public keys only)
68             This is a single letter, but be prepared that additional
69             information may follow in some future versions.
70 10. Field:  User-ID.  The value is quoted like a C string to avoid
71             control characters (the colon is quoted "\x3a").
72             This is not used with --fixed-list-mode in gpg.
73             A UAT record puts the attribute subpacket count here, a
74             space, and then the total attribute subpacket size.
75             In gpgsm the issuer name comes here
76             An FPR record stores the fingerprint here.
77             The fingerprint of an revocation key is stored here.
78 11. Field:  Signature class.  This is a 2 digit hexnumber followed by
79             either the letter 'x' for an exportable signature or the
80             letter 'l' for a local-only signature.
81             The class byte of an revocation key is also given here,
82             'x' and 'l' ist used the same way.
83 12. Field:  Key capabilities:
84                 e = encrypt
85                 s = sign
86                 c = certify
87             A key may have any combination of them.  The primary key has in
88             addition to these letters, uppercase version of the letter to
89             denote the _usable_ capabilities of the entire key.  
90 13. Field:  Used in FPR records for S/MIME keys to store the fingerprint of
91             the issuer certificate.  This is useful to build the
92             certificate path based on certificates stored in the local
93             keyDB; it is only filled if the issue certificate is
94             available. The advantage of using this value is that it is
95             guaranteed to have been been build by the same lookup
96             algorithm as gpgsm uses.
97             For "uid" recods this lists the preferences n the sameway the 
98             -edit menu does.
99 14. Field   Flag field used in the --edit menu output:
100
101
102 All dates are displayed in the format yyyy-mm-dd unless you use the
103 option --fixed-list-mode in which case they are displayed as seconds
104 since Epoch.  More fields may be added later, so parsers should be
105 prepared for this. When parsing a number the parser should stop at the
106 first non-number character so that additional information can later be
107 added.
108
109 If field 1 has the tag "pkd", a listing looks like this:
110 pkd:0:1024:B665B1435F4C2 .... FF26ABB:
111     !  !   !-- the value
112     !  !------ for information number of bits in the value
113     !--------- index (eg. DSA goes from 0 to 3: p,q,g,y)
114
115  
116
117 Format of the "--status-fd" output
118 ==================================
119 Every line is prefixed with "[GNUPG:] ", followed by a keyword with
120 the type of the status line and a some arguments depending on the
121 type (maybe none); an application should always be prepared to see
122 more arguments in future versions.
123
124
125     GOODSIG     <long keyid>  <username>
126         The signature with the keyid is good.  For each signature only
127         one of the three codes GOODSIG, BADSIG or ERRSIG will be
128         emitted and they may be used as a marker for a new signature.
129         The username is the primary one encoded in UTF-8 and %XX
130         escaped.
131
132     EXPSIG      <long keyid>  <username>
133         The signature with the keyid is good, but the signature is
134         expired. The username is the primary one encoded in UTF-8 and
135         %XX escaped.
136
137     EXPKEYSIG   <long keyid>  <username>
138         The signature with the keyid is good, but the signature was
139         made by an expired key. The username is the primary one
140         encoded in UTF-8 and %XX escaped.
141
142     BADSIG      <long keyid>  <username>
143         The signature with the keyid has not been verified okay.
144         The username is the primary one encoded in UTF-8 and %XX
145         escaped.
146
147     ERRSIG  <long keyid>  <pubkey_algo> <hash_algo> \
148             <sig_class> <timestamp> <rc>
149         It was not possible to check the signature.  This may be
150         caused by a missing public key or an unsupported algorithm.
151         A RC of 4 indicates unknown algorithm, a 9 indicates a missing
152         public key. The other fields give more information about
153         this signature.  sig_class is a 2 byte hex-value.
154
155     VALIDSIG    <fingerprint in hex> <sig_creation_date> <sig-timestamp>
156                 <expire-timestamp>
157
158         The signature with the keyid is good. This is the same
159         as GOODSIG but has the fingerprint as the argument. Both
160         status lines are emitted for a good signature.
161         sig-timestamp is the signature creation time in seconds after
162         the epoch. expire-timestamp is the signature expiration time
163         in seconds after the epoch (zero means "does not expire").
164
165     SIG_ID  <radix64_string>  <sig_creation_date>  <sig-timestamp>
166         This is emitted only for signatures of class 0 or 1 which
167         have been verified okay.  The string is a signature id
168         and may be used in applications to detect replay attacks
169         of signed messages.  Note that only DLP algorithms give
170         unique ids - others may yield duplicated ones when they
171         have been created in the same second.
172
173     ENC_TO  <long keyid>  <keytype>  <keylength>
174         The message is encrypted to this keyid.
175         keytype is the numerical value of the public key algorithm,
176         keylength is the length of the key or 0 if it is not known
177         (which is currently always the case).
178
179     NODATA  <what>
180         No data has been found. Codes for what are:
181             1 - No armored data.
182             2 - Expected a packet but did not found one.
183             3 - Invalid packet found, this may indicate a non OpenPGP message.
184         You may see more than one of these status lines.
185
186     UNEXPECTED <what>
187         Unexpected data has been encountered
188             0 - not further specified               1       
189   
190
191     TRUST_UNDEFINED <error token>
192     TRUST_NEVER  <error token>
193     TRUST_MARGINAL
194     TRUST_FULLY
195     TRUST_ULTIMATE
196         For good signatures one of these status lines are emitted
197         to indicate how trustworthy the signature is.  The error token
198         values are currently only emiited by gpgsm.
199
200     SIGEXPIRED
201         This is deprecated in favor of KEYEXPIRED.
202
203     KEYEXPIRED <expire-timestamp>
204         The key has expired.  expire-timestamp is the expiration time
205         in seconds after the epoch.
206
207     KEYREVOKED
208         The used key has been revoked by its owner.  No arguments yet.
209
210     BADARMOR
211         The ASCII armor is corrupted.  No arguments yet.
212
213     RSA_OR_IDEA
214         The IDEA algorithms has been used in the data.  A
215         program might want to fallback to another program to handle
216         the data if GnuPG failed.  This status message used to be emitted
217         also for RSA but this has been dropped after the RSA patent expired.
218         However we can't change the name of the message.
219
220     SHM_INFO
221     SHM_GET
222     SHM_GET_BOOL
223     SHM_GET_HIDDEN
224
225     GET_BOOL
226     GET_LINE
227     GET_HIDDEN
228     GOT_IT
229
230     NEED_PASSPHRASE <long main keyid> <long keyid> <keytype> <keylength>
231         Issued whenever a passphrase is needed.
232         keytype is the numerical value of the public key algorithm
233         or 0 if this is not applicable, keylength is the length
234         of the key or 0 if it is not known (this is currently always the case).
235
236     NEED_PASSPHRASE_SYM <cipher_algo> <s2k_mode> <s2k_hash>
237         Issued whenever a passphrase for symmetric encryption is needed.
238
239     MISSING_PASSPHRASE
240         No passphrase was supplied.  An application which encounters this
241         message may want to stop parsing immediately because the next message
242         will probably be a BAD_PASSPHRASE.  However, if the application
243         is a wrapper around the key edit menu functionality it might not
244         make sense to stop parsing but simply ignoring the following
245         BAD_PASSPHRASE.
246
247     BAD_PASSPHRASE <long keyid>
248         The supplied passphrase was wrong or not given.  In the latter case
249         you may have seen a MISSING_PASSPHRASE.
250
251     GOOD_PASSPHRASE
252         The supplied passphrase was good and the secret key material
253         is therefore usable.
254
255     DECRYPTION_FAILED
256         The symmetric decryption failed - one reason could be a wrong
257         passphrase for a symmetrical encrypted message.
258
259     DECRYPTION_OKAY
260         The decryption process succeeded.  This means, that either the
261         correct secret key has been used or the correct passphrase
262         for a conventional encrypted message was given.  The program
263         itself may return an errorcode because it may not be possible to
264         verify a signature for some reasons.
265
266     NO_PUBKEY  <long keyid>
267     NO_SECKEY  <long keyid>
268         The key is not available
269
270     IMPORTED   <long keyid>  <username>
271         The keyid and name of the signature just imported
272
273     IMPORT_PROBLEM <reason> [<fingerprint>]
274         Issued for each import failure.  Reason codes are:
275           0 := "No specific reason given".
276           1 := "Invalid Certificate".
277           2 := "Issuer Certificate missing".
278           3 := "Certificate Chain too long".
279           4 := "Error storing certificate".
280
281     IMPORT_RES <count> <no_user_id> <imported> <imported_rsa> <unchanged>
282         <n_uids> <n_subk> <n_sigs> <n_revoc> <sec_read> <sec_imported> <sec_dups> <not_imported>
283         Final statistics on import process (this is one long line)
284
285     FILE_START <what> <filename>
286         Start processing a file <filename>.  <what> indicates the performed
287         operation:
288             1 - verify
289             2 - encrypt
290             3 - decrypt        
291
292     FILE_DONE
293         Marks the end of a file processing which has been started
294         by FILE_START.
295
296     BEGIN_DECRYPTION
297     END_DECRYPTION
298         Mark the start and end of the actual decryption process.  These
299         are also emitted when in --list-only mode.
300
301     BEGIN_ENCRYPTION  <mdc_method> <sym_algo>
302     END_ENCRYPTION
303         Mark the start and end of the actual encryption process.
304
305     DELETE_PROBLEM reason_code
306         Deleting a key failed.  Reason codes are:
307             1 - No such key
308             2 - Must delete secret key first
309             3 - Ambigious specification
310
311     PROGRESS what char cur total
312         Used by the primegen and Public key functions to indicate progress.
313         "char" is the character displayed with no --status-fd enabled, with
314         the linefeed replaced by an 'X'.  "cur" is the current amount
315         done and "total" is amount to be done; a "total" of 0 indicates that
316         the total amount is not known.  100/100 may be used to detect the
317         end of operation.
318
319     SIG_CREATED <type> <pubkey algo> <hash algo> <class> <timestamp> <key fpr>
320         A signature has been created using these parameters.
321             type:  'D' = detached
322                    'C' = cleartext
323                    'S' = standard
324                    (only the first character should be checked)
325             class: 2 hex digits with the signature class
326         
327     KEY_CREATED <type>
328         A key has been created
329             type: 'B' = primary and subkey
330                   'P' = primary
331                   'S' = subkey
332
333     SESSION_KEY  <algo>:<hexdigits>
334         The session key used to decrypt the message.  This message will
335         only be emmited when the special option --show-session-key
336         is used.  The format is suitable to be passed to the option
337         --override-session-key
338
339     NOTATION_NAME <name> 
340     NOTATION_DATA <string>
341         name and string are %XX escaped; the data may be splitted
342         among several notation_data lines.
343
344     USERID_HINT <long main keyid> <string>
345         Give a hint about the user ID for a certain keyID. 
346
347     POLICY_URL <string>
348         string is %XX escaped
349
350     BEGIN_STREAM
351     END_STREAM
352         Issued by pipemode.
353
354     INV_RECP <reason> <requested_recipient>
355         Issued for each unusable recipient. The reasons codes
356         currently in use are:
357           0 := "No specific reason given".
358           1 := "Not Found"
359           2 := "Ambigious specification"
360           3 := "Wrong key usage"
361           4 := "Key revoked"
362           5 := "Key expired"
363           6 := "No CRL known"
364           7 := "CRL too old"
365           8 := "Policy mismatch"
366           9 := "Not a secret key"
367         Note that this status is also used for gpgsm's SIGNER command
368         where it relates to signer's of course.
369
370     NO_RECP <reserved>
371         Issued when no recipients are usable.
372
373     ALREADY_SIGNED <long-keyid>
374         Warning: This is experimental and might be removed at any time.
375
376     TRUNCATED <maxno>
377         The output was truncated to MAXNO items.  This status code is issued
378         for certain external requests
379
380     ERROR <error location> <error code> 
381         This is a generic error status message, it might be followed
382         by error location specific data. <error token> and
383         <error_location> should not contain a space.
384
385     ATTRIBUTE <fpr> <octets> <type> <index> <count>
386               <timestamp> <expiredate> <flags>
387         This is one long line issued for each attribute subpacket when
388         an attribute packet is seen during key listing.  <fpr> is the
389         fingerprint of the key. <octets> is the length of the
390         attribute subpacket. <type> is the attribute type
391         (1==image). <index>/<count> indicates that this is the Nth
392         indexed subpacket of count total subpackets in this attribute
393         packet.  <timestamp> and <expiredate> are from the
394         self-signature on the attribute packet.  If the attribute
395         packet does not have a valid self-signature, then the
396         timestamp is 0.  <flags> are a bitwise OR of:
397                 0x01 = this attribute packet is a primary uid
398                 0x02 = this attribute packet is revoked
399                 0x04 = this attribute packet is expired
400
401
402 Key generation
403 ==============
404     Key generation shows progress by printing different characters to
405     stderr:
406              "."  Last 10 Miller-Rabin tests failed
407              "+"  Miller-Rabin test succeeded
408              "!"  Reloading the pool with fresh prime numbers
409              "^"  Checking a new value for the generator
410              "<"  Size of one factor decreased
411              ">"  Size of one factor increased
412
413     The prime number for ElGamal is generated this way:
414
415     1) Make a prime number q of 160, 200, 240 bits (depending on the keysize)
416     2) Select the length of the other prime factors to be at least the size
417        of q and calculate the number of prime factors needed
418     3) Make a pool of prime numbers, each of the length determined in step 2
419     4) Get a new permutation out of the pool or continue with step 3
420        if we have tested all permutations.
421     5) Calculate a candidate prime p = 2 * q * p[1] * ... * p[n] + 1
422     6) Check that this prime has the correct length (this may change q if
423        it seems not to be possible to make a prime of the desired length)
424     7) Check whether this is a prime using trial divisions and the
425        Miller-Rabin test.
426     8) Continue with step 4 if we did not find a prime in step 7.
427     9) Find a generator for that prime.
428
429     This algorithm is based on Lim and Lee's suggestion from the
430     Crypto '97 proceedings p. 260.
431
432
433 Unattended key generation
434 =========================
435 This feature allows unattended generation of keys controlled by a
436 parameter file.  To use this feature, you use --gen-key together with
437 --batch and feed the parameters either from stdin or from a file given
438 on the commandline.
439
440 The format of this file is as follows:
441   o Text only, line length is limited to about 1000 chars.
442   o You must use UTF-8 encoding to specify non-ascii characters.
443   o Empty lines are ignored.
444   o Leading and trailing spaces are ignored.
445   o A hash sign as the first non white space character indicates a comment line.
446   o Control statements are indicated by a leading percent sign, the
447     arguments are separated by white space from the keyword.
448   o Parameters are specified by a keyword, followed by a colon.  Arguments
449     are separated by white space.
450   o The first parameter must be "Key-Type", control statements
451     may be placed anywhere.
452   o Key generation takes place when either the end of the parameter file
453     is reached, the next "Key-Type" parameter is encountered or at the
454     control statement "%commit"
455   o Control statements:
456     %echo <text>
457         Print <text>.
458     %dry-run
459         Suppress actual key generation (useful for syntax checking).
460     %commit
461         Perform the key generation.  An implicit commit is done
462         at the next "Key-Type" parameter.
463     %pubring <filename>
464     %secring <filename>
465         Do not write the key to the default or commandline given
466         keyring but to <filename>.  This must be given before the first
467         commit to take place, duplicate specification of the same filename
468         is ignored, the last filename before a commit is used.
469         The filename is used until a new filename is used (at commit points)
470         and all keys are written to that file.  If a new filename is given,
471         this file is created (and overwrites an existing one).
472         Both control statements must be given.
473    o The order of the parameters does not matter except for "Key-Type"
474      which must be the first parameter.  The parameters are only for the
475      generated keyblock and parameters from previous key generations are not
476      used. Some syntactically checks may be performed.
477      The currently defined parameters are:
478      Key-Type: <algo-number>|<algo-string>
479         Starts a new parameter block by giving the type of the
480         primary key. The algorithm must be capable of signing.
481         This is a required parameter.
482      Key-Length: <length-in-bits>
483         Length of the key in bits.  Default is 1024.
484      Key-Usage: <usage-list>
485         Space or comma delimited list of key usage, allowed values are
486         "encrypt" and "sign".  This is used to generate the key flags.
487         Please make sure that the algorithm is capable of this usage.
488      Subkey-Type: <algo-number>|<algo-string>
489         This generates a secondary key.  Currently only one subkey
490         can be handled.
491      Subkey-Length: <length-in-bits>
492         Length of the subkey in bits.  Default is 1024.
493      Subkey-Usage: <usage-list>
494         Similar to Key-Usage.
495      Passphrase: <string>
496         If you want to specify a passphrase for the secret key,
497         enter it here.  Default is not to use any passphrase.
498      Name-Real: <string>
499      Name-Comment: <string>
500      Name-Email: <string>
501         The 3 parts of a key. Remember to use UTF-8 here.
502         If you don't give any of them, no user ID is created.
503      Expire-Date: <iso-date>|(<number>[d|w|m|y])
504         Set the expiration date for the key (and the subkey).  It
505         may either be entered in ISO date format (2000-08-15) or as
506         number of days, weeks, month or years. Without a letter days
507         are assumed.
508      Preferences: <string>
509         Set the cipher, hash, and compression preference values for
510         this key.  This expects the same type of string as "setpref"
511         in the --edit menu.
512      Revoker: <algo>:<fpr> [sensitive]
513         Add a designated revoker to the generated key.  Algo is the
514         public key algorithm of the designated revoker (i.e. RSA=1,
515         DSA=17, etc.)  Fpr is the fingerprint of the designated
516         revoker.  The optional "sensitive" flag marks the designated
517         revoker as sensitive information.  Only v4 keys may be
518         designated revokers.
519
520 Here is an example:
521 $ cat >foo <<EOF
522      %echo Generating a standard key
523      Key-Type: DSA
524      Key-Length: 1024
525      Subkey-Type: ELG-E
526      Subkey-Length: 1024
527      Name-Real: Joe Tester
528      Name-Comment: with stupid passphrase
529      Name-Email: joe@foo.bar
530      Expire-Date: 0
531      Passphrase: abc
532      %pubring foo.pub
533      %secring foo.sec
534      # Do a commit here, so that we can later print "done" :-)
535      %commit
536      %echo done
537 EOF
538 $ gpg --batch --gen-key -a foo
539  [...]
540 $ gpg --no-default-keyring --secret-keyring foo.sec \
541                                   --keyring foo.pub --list-secret-keys
542 /home/wk/work/gnupg-stable/scratch/foo.sec
543 ------------------------------------------
544 sec  1024D/915A878D 2000-03-09 Joe Tester (with stupid passphrase) <joe@foo.bar>
545 ssb  1024g/8F70E2C0 2000-03-09
546
547
548
549 Layout of the TrustDB
550 =====================
551 The TrustDB is built from fixed length records, where the first byte
552 describes the record type.  All numeric values are stored in network
553 byte order. The length of each record is 40 bytes. The first record of
554 the DB is always of type 1 and this is the only record of this type.
555
556 FIXME:  The layout changed, document it here.
557
558   Record type 0:
559   --------------
560     Unused record, can be reused for any purpose.
561
562   Record type 1:
563   --------------
564     Version information for this TrustDB.  This is always the first
565     record of the DB and the only one with type 1.
566      1 byte value 1
567      3 bytes 'gpg'  magic value
568      1 byte Version of the TrustDB (2)
569      1 byte marginals needed
570      1 byte completes needed
571      1 byte max_cert_depth
572             The three items are used to check whether the cached
573             validity value from the dir record can be used.
574      1 u32  locked flags
575      1 u32  timestamp of trustdb creation
576      1 u32  timestamp of last modification which may affect the validity
577             of keys in the trustdb.  This value is checked against the
578             validity timestamp in the dir records.
579      1 u32  timestamp of last validation
580             (Used to keep track of the time, when this TrustDB was checked
581              against the pubring)
582      1 u32  record number of keyhashtable
583      1 u32  first free record
584      1 u32  record number of shadow directory hash table
585             It does not make sense to combine this table with the key table
586             because the keyid is not in every case a part of the fingerprint.
587      1 u32  record number of the trusthashtbale
588
589
590   Record type 2: (directory record)
591   --------------
592     Informations about a public key certificate.
593     These are static values which are never changed without user interaction.
594
595      1 byte value 2
596      1 byte  reserved
597      1 u32   LID     .  (This is simply the record number of this record.)
598      1 u32   List of key-records (the first one is the primary key)
599      1 u32   List of uid-records
600      1 u32   cache record
601      1 byte  ownertrust
602      1 byte  dirflag
603      1 byte  maximum validity of all the user ids
604      1 u32   time of last validity check.
605      1 u32   Must check when this time has been reached.
606              (0 = no check required)
607
608
609   Record type 3:  (key record)
610   --------------
611     Informations about a primary public key.
612     (This is mainly used to lookup a trust record)
613
614      1 byte value 3
615      1 byte  reserved
616      1 u32   LID
617      1 u32   next   - next key record
618      7 bytes reserved
619      1 byte  keyflags
620      1 byte  pubkey algorithm
621      1 byte  length of the fingerprint (in bytes)
622      20 bytes fingerprint of the public key
623               (This is the value we use to identify a key)
624
625   Record type 4: (uid record)
626   --------------
627     Informations about a userid
628     We do not store the userid but the hash value of the userid because that
629     is sufficient.
630
631      1 byte value 4
632      1 byte reserved
633      1 u32  LID  points to the directory record.
634      1 u32  next   next userid
635      1 u32  pointer to preference record
636      1 u32  siglist  list of valid signatures
637      1 byte uidflags
638      1 byte validity of the key calculated over this user id
639      20 bytes ripemd160 hash of the username.
640
641
642   Record type 5: (pref record)
643   --------------
644     This record type is not anymore used.
645
646      1 byte value 5
647      1 byte   reserved
648      1 u32  LID; points to the directory record (and not to the uid record!).
649             (or 0 for standard preference record)
650      1 u32  next
651      30 byte preference data
652
653   Record type 6  (sigrec)
654   -------------
655     Used to keep track of key signatures. Self-signatures are not
656     stored.  If a public key is not in the DB, the signature points to
657     a shadow dir record, which in turn has a list of records which
658     might be interested in this key (and the signature record here
659     is one).
660
661      1 byte   value 6
662      1 byte   reserved
663      1 u32    LID           points back to the dir record
664      1 u32    next   next sigrec of this uid or 0 to indicate the
665                      last sigrec.
666      6 times
667         1 u32  Local_id of signatures dir or shadow dir record
668         1 byte Flag: Bit 0 = checked: Bit 1 is valid (we have a real
669                              directory record for this)
670                          1 = valid is set (but may be revoked)
671
672
673
674   Record type 8: (shadow directory record)
675   --------------
676     This record is used to reserve a LID for a public key.  We
677     need this to create the sig records of other keys, even if we
678     do not yet have the public key of the signature.
679     This record (the record number to be more precise) will be reused
680     as the dir record when we import the real public key.
681
682      1 byte value 8
683      1 byte  reserved
684      1 u32   LID      (This is simply the record number of this record.)
685      2 u32   keyid
686      1 byte  pubkey algorithm
687      3 byte reserved
688      1 u32   hintlist   A list of records which have references to
689                         this key.  This is used for fast access to
690                         signature records which are not yet checked.
691                         Note, that this is only a hint and the actual records
692                         may not anymore hold signature records for that key
693                         but that the code cares about this.
694     18 byte reserved
695
696
697
698   Record Type 10 (hash table)
699   --------------
700     Due to the fact that we use fingerprints to lookup keys, we can
701     implement quick access by some simple hash methods, and avoid
702     the overhead of gdbm.  A property of fingerprints is that they can be
703     used directly as hash values.  (They can be considered as strong
704     random numbers.)
705       What we use is a dynamic multilevel architecture, which combines
706     hashtables, record lists, and linked lists.
707
708     This record is a hashtable of 256 entries; a special property
709     is that all these records are stored consecutively to make one
710     big table. The hash value is simple the 1st, 2nd, ... byte of
711     the fingerprint (depending on the indirection level).
712
713     When used to hash shadow directory records, a different table is used
714     and indexed by the keyid.
715
716      1 byte value 10
717      1 byte reserved
718      n u32  recnum; n depends on the record length:
719             n = (reclen-2)/4  which yields 9 for the current record length
720             of 40 bytes.
721
722     the total number of such record which makes up the table is:
723          m = (256+n-1) / n
724     which is 29 for a record length of 40.
725
726     To look up a key we use the first byte of the fingerprint to get
727     the recnum from this hashtable and look up the addressed record:
728        - If this record is another hashtable, we use 2nd byte
729          to index this hash table and so on.
730        - if this record is a hashlist, we walk all entries
731          until we found one a matching one.
732        - if this record is a key record, we compare the
733          fingerprint and to decide whether it is the requested key;
734
735
736   Record type 11 (hash list)
737   --------------
738     see hash table for an explanation.
739     This is also used for other purposes.
740
741     1 byte value 11
742     1 byte reserved
743     1 u32  next          next hash list record
744     n times              n = (reclen-5)/5
745         1 u32  recnum
746
747     For the current record length of 40, n is 7
748
749
750
751   Record type 254 (free record)
752   ---------------
753     All these records form a linked list of unused records.
754      1 byte  value 254
755      1 byte  reserved (0)
756      1 u32   next_free
757
758
759
760 Packet Headers
761 ===============
762
763 GNUPG uses PGP 2 packet headers and also understands OpenPGP packet header.
764 There is one enhancement used with the old style packet headers:
765
766    CTB bits 10, the "packet-length length bits", have values listed in
767    the following table:
768
769       00 - 1-byte packet-length field
770       01 - 2-byte packet-length field
771       10 - 4-byte packet-length field
772       11 - no packet length supplied, unknown packet length
773
774    As indicated in this table, depending on the packet-length length
775    bits, the remaining 1, 2, 4, or 0 bytes of the packet structure field
776    are a "packet-length field".  The packet-length field is a whole
777    number field.  The value of the packet-length field is defined to be
778    the value of the whole number field.
779
780    A value of 11 is currently used in one place: on compressed data.
781    That is, a compressed data block currently looks like <A3 01 . .  .>,
782    where <A3>, binary 10 1000 11, is an indefinite-length packet. The
783    proper interpretation is "until the end of the enclosing structure",
784    although it should never appear outermost (where the enclosing
785    structure is a file).
786
787 +  This will be changed with another version, where the new meaning of
788 +  the value 11 (see below) will also take place.
789 +
790 +  A value of 11 for other packets enables a special length encoding,
791 +  which is used in case, where the length of the following packet can
792 +  not be determined prior to writing the packet; especially this will
793 +  be used if large amounts of data are processed in filter mode.
794 +
795 +  It works like this: After the CTB (with a length field of 11) a
796 +  marker field is used, which gives the length of the following datablock.
797 +  This is a simple 2 byte field (MSB first) containing the amount of data
798 +  following this field, not including this length field. After this datablock
799 +  another length field follows, which gives the size of the next datablock.
800 +  A value of 0 indicates the end of the packet. The maximum size of a
801 +  data block is limited to 65534, thereby reserving a value of 0xffff for
802 +  future extensions. These length markers must be inserted into the data
803 +  stream just before writing the data out.
804 +
805 +  This 2 byte field is large enough, because the application must buffer
806 +  this amount of data to prepend the length marker before writing it out.
807 +  Data block sizes larger than about 32k doesn't make any sense. Note
808 +  that this may also be used for compressed data streams, but we must use
809 +  another packet version to tell the application that it can not assume,
810 +  that this is the last packet.
811
812
813 GNU extensions to the S2K algorithm
814 ===================================
815 S2K mode 101 is used to identify these extensions.
816 After the hash algorithm the 3 bytes "GNU" are used to make
817 clear that these are extensions for GNU, the next bytes gives the
818 GNU protection mode - 1000.  Defined modes are:
819   1001 - do not store the secret part at all
820
821
822 Usage of gdbm files for keyrings
823 ================================
824     The key to store the keyblock is its fingerprint, other records
825     are used for secondary keys.  Fingerprints are always 20 bytes
826     where 16 bit fingerprints are appended with zero.
827     The first byte of the key gives some information on the type of the
828     key.
829       1 = key is a 20 bit fingerprint (16 bytes fpr are padded with zeroes)
830           data is the keyblock
831       2 = key is the complete 8 byte keyid
832           data is a list of 20 byte fingerprints
833       3 = key is the short 4 byte keyid
834           data is a list of 20 byte fingerprints
835       4 = key is the email address
836           data is a list of 20 byte fingerprints
837
838     Data is prepended with a type byte:
839       1 = keyblock
840       2 = list of 20 byte padded fingerprints
841       3 = list of list fingerprints (but how to we key them?)
842
843
844
845 Pipemode
846 ========
847 This mode can be used to perform multiple operations with one call to
848 gpg. It comes handy in cases where you have to verify a lot of
849 signatures. Currently we support only detached signatures.  This mode
850 is a kludge to avoid running gpg n daemon mode and using Unix Domain
851 Sockets to pass the data to it.  There is no easy portable way to do
852 this under Windows, so we use plain old pipes which do work well under
853 Windows.  Because there is no way to signal multiple EOFs in a pipe we
854 have to embed control commands in the data stream: We distinguish
855 between a data state and a control state.  Initially the system is in
856 data state but it won't accept any data.  Instead it waits for
857 transition to control state which is done by sending a single '@'
858 character.  While in control state the control command os expected and
859 this command is just a single byte after which the system falls back
860 to data state (but does not necesary accept data now).  The simplest
861 control command is a '@' which just inserts this character into the
862 data stream.
863
864 Here is the format we use for detached signatures:
865 "@<"  - Begin of new stream
866 "@B"  - Detached signature follows.
867         This emits a control packet (1,'B')
868 <detached_signature>
869 "@t"  - Signed text follows. 
870         This emits the control packet (2, 'B')
871 <signed_text>
872 "@."  - End of operation. The final control packet forces signature
873         verification
874 "@>"  - End of stream   
875
876
877
878
879
880
881 Other Notes
882 ===========
883     * For packet version 3 we calculate the keyids this way:
884         RSA     := low 64 bits of n
885         ELGAMAL := build a v3 pubkey packet (with CTB 0x99) and calculate
886                    a rmd160 hash value from it. This is used as the
887                    fingerprint and the low 64 bits are the keyid.
888
889     * Revocation certificates consist only of the signature packet;
890       "import" knows how to handle this.  The rationale behind it is
891       to keep them small.
892
893
894
895
896
897
898
899 Keyserver Message Format
900 =========================
901
902 The keyserver may be contacted by a Unix Domain socket or via TCP.
903
904 The format of a request is:
905
906 ====
907 command-tag
908 "Content-length:" digits
909 CRLF
910 =======
911
912 Where command-tag is
913
914 NOOP
915 GET <user-name>
916 PUT
917 DELETE <user-name>
918
919
920 The format of a response is:
921
922 ======
923 "GNUPG/1.0" status-code status-text
924 "Content-length:" digits
925 CRLF
926 ============
927 followed by <digits> bytes of data
928
929
930 Status codes are:
931
932      o  1xx: Informational - Request received, continuing process
933
934      o  2xx: Success - The action was successfully received, understood,
935         and accepted
936
937      o  4xx: Client Error - The request contains bad syntax or cannot be
938         fulfilled
939
940      o  5xx: Server Error - The server failed to fulfill an apparently
941         valid request
942
943
944
945 Documentation on HKP (the http keyserver protocol):
946
947 A minimalistic HTTP server on port 11371 recognizes a GET for /pks/lookup.
948 The standard http URL encoded query parameters are this (always key=value):
949
950 - op=index (like pgp -kv), op=vindex (like pgp -kvv) and op=get (like
951   pgp -kxa)
952
953 - search=<stringlist>. This is a list of words that must occur in the key.
954   The words are delimited with space, points, @ and so on. The delimiters
955   are not searched for and the order of the words doesn't matter (but see
956   next option).
957
958 - exact=on. This switch tells the hkp server to only report exact matching
959   keys back. In this case the order and the "delimiters" are important.
960
961 - fingerprint=on. Also reports the fingerprints when used with 'index' or
962   'vindex'
963
964 The keyserver also recognizes http-POSTs to /pks/add. Use this to upload
965 keys.
966
967
968 A better way to do this would be a request like:
969
970    /pks/lookup/<gnupg_formatierte_user_id>?op=<operation>
971
972 This can be implemented using Hurd's translator mechanism.
973 However, I think the whole key server stuff has to be re-thought;
974 I have some ideas and probably create a white paper.
975