doc: Clarify constraints on who modifies files in ~/.gnupg
[gnupg.git] / doc / HACKING
1 # HACKING                                                       -*- org -*-
2 #+TITLE: A Hacker's Guide to GnuPG
3 #+TEXT: Some notes on GnuPG internals
4 #+STARTUP: showall
5 #+OPTIONS: ^:{}
6
7 * How to contribute
8
9   The following stuff explains some basic procedures you need to
10   follow if you want to contribute code or documentation.
11
12 ** No more ChangeLog files
13
14 Do not modify any of the ChangeLog files in GnuPG.  Starting on
15 December 1st, 2011 we put change information only in the GIT commit
16 log, and generate a top-level ChangeLog file from logs at "make dist"
17 time.  As such, there are strict requirements on the form of the
18 commit log messages.  The old ChangeLog files have all be renamed to
19 ChangeLog-2011
20
21 ** Commit log requirements
22
23 Your commit log should always start with a one-line summary, the
24 second line should be blank, and the remaining lines are usually
25 ChangeLog-style entries for all affected files.  However, it's fine
26 --- even recommended --- to write a few lines of prose describing the
27 change, when the summary and ChangeLog entries don't give enough of
28 the big picture.  Omit the leading TABs that you are seeing in a
29 "real" ChangeLog file, but keep the maximum line length at 72 or
30 smaller, so that the generated ChangeLog lines, each with its leading
31 TAB, will not exceed 80 columns.  If you want to add text which shall
32 not be copied to the ChangeLog, separate it by a line consisting of
33 two dashes at the begin of a line.
34
35 Typo fixes and documentation updates don't need a ChangeLog Entry,
36 thus you would use a commit message like
37
38 #+begin_example
39 Fix type in a comment
40
41 --
42 #+end_example
43
44 The marker line here is important; without it the first line would
45 appear in the ChangeLog.
46
47 ** License policy
48
49   GnuPG is licensed under the GPLv3+ with some files under a mixed
50   LGPLv3+/GPLv2+ license.  It is thus important, that all contributed
51   code allows for an update of the license; for example we can't
52   accept code under the GPLv2(only).
53
54   GnuPG used to have a strict policy of requiring copyright
55   assignments to the FSF.  To avoid this major organizational overhead
56   and to allow inclusion of code, not copyrighted by the FSF, this
57   policy has been relaxed on 2013-03-29.  It is now also possible to
58   contribute code by asserting that the contribution is in accordance
59   to the "Libgcrypt Developer's Certificate of Origin" as found in the
60   file "DCO".  (Except for a slight wording change, this DCO is
61   identical to the one used by the Linux kernel.)
62
63   If your want to contribute code or documentation to GnuPG and you
64   didn't signed a copyright assignment with the FSF in the past, you
65   need to take these simple steps:
66
67   - Decide which mail address you want to use.  Please have your real
68     name in the address and not a pseudonym.  Anonymous contributions
69     can only be done if you find a proxy who certifies for you.
70
71   - If your employer or school might claim ownership of code written
72     by you; you need to talk to them to make sure that you have the
73     right to contribute under the DCO.
74
75   - Send an OpenPGP signed mail to the gnupg-devel@gnupg.org mailing
76     list from your mail address.  Include a copy of the DCO as found
77     in the official master branch.  Insert your name and email address
78     into the DCO in the same way you want to use it later.  Example:
79
80       Signed-off-by: Joe R. Hacker <joe@example.org>
81
82     (If you really need it, you may perform simple transformations of
83     the mail address: Replacing "@" by " at " or "." by " dot ".)
84
85   - That's it.  From now on you only need to add a "Signed-off-by:"
86     line with your name and mail address to the commit message.  It is
87     recommended to send the patches using a PGP/MIME signed mail.
88
89 ** Coding standards
90
91   Please follow the GNU coding standards.  If you are in doubt consult
92   the existing code as an example.  Do no re-indent code without a
93   need.  If you really need to do it, use a separate commit for such a
94   change.
95
96 ** Commit log keywords
97
98   - GnuPG-bug-id :: Values are comma or space delimited bug numbers
99                     from bug.gnupg.org pertaining to this commit.
100   - Debian-bug-id :: Same as above but from the Debian bug tracker.
101   - CVE-id :: CVE id number pertaining to this commit.
102   - Regression-due-to :: Commit id of the regression fixed by this commit.
103   - Fixes-commit :: Commit id this commit fixes.
104   - Reported-by :: Value is a name or mail address of a bug reporte.
105   - Suggested-by :: Value is a name or mail address of someone how
106                     suggested this change.
107   - Co-authored-by :: Name or mail address of a co-author
108   - Some-comments-by :: Name or mail address of the author of
109                         additional comments (commit log or code).
110   - Proofread-by :: Sometimes used by translation commits.
111   - Signed-off-by :: Name or mail address of the developer
112
113 * Windows
114 ** How to build an installer for Windows
115
116    Your best bet is to use a decent Debian System for development.
117    You need to install a long list of tools for building.  This list
118    still needs to be compiled.  However, the build process will stop
119    if a tool is missing.  GNU make is required (on non GNU systems
120    often installed as "gmake").  The installer requires a couple of
121    extra software to be available either as tarballs or as local git
122    repositories.  In case this file here is part of a gnupg-w32-2.*.xz
123    complete tarball as distributed from the same place as a binary
124    installer, all such tarballs are already included.
125
126    Cd to the GnuPG source directory and use one of one of these
127    command:
128
129    - If sources are included (gnupg-w32-*.tar.xz)
130
131      make -f build-aux/speedo.mk WHAT=this installer
132
133    - To build from tarballs
134
135      make -f build-aux/speedo.mk WHAT=release TARBALLS=TARDIR installer
136
137    - To build from local GIT repos
138
139      make -f build-aux/speedo.mk WHAT=git TARBALLS=TARDIR installer
140
141    Note that also you need to supply tarballs with supporting
142    libraries even if you build from git.  The makefile expects only
143    the core GnuPG software to be available as local GIT repositories.
144    speedo.mk has the versions of the tarballs and the branch names of
145    the git repositories.  In case of problems, don't hesitate to ask
146    on the gnupg-devel mailing for help.
147
148
149 * Debug hints
150
151   See the manual for some hints.
152
153 * Standards
154 ** RFCs
155
156 1423  Privacy Enhancement for Internet Electronic Mail:
157       Part III: Algorithms, Modes, and Identifiers.
158
159 1489  Registration of a Cyrillic Character Set.
160
161 1750  Randomness Recommendations for Security.
162
163 1991  PGP Message Exchange Formats (obsolete)
164
165 2144  The CAST-128 Encryption Algorithm.
166
167 2279  UTF-8, a transformation format of ISO 10646.
168
169 2440  OpenPGP (obsolete).
170
171 3156  MIME Security with Pretty Good Privacy (PGP).
172
173 4880  Current OpenPGP specification.
174
175 6337  Elliptic Curve Cryptography (ECC) in OpenPGP
176
177 * Various information
178
179 ** Directory Layout
180
181   - ./        :: Readme, configure
182   - ./agent   :: Gpg-agent and related tools
183   - ./doc     :: Documentation
184   - ./g10     :: Gpg program here called gpg2
185   - ./sm      :: Gpgsm program
186   - ./jnlib   :: Not used (formerly used utility functions)
187   - ./common  :: Utility functions
188   - ./kbx     :: Keybox library
189   - ./scd     :: Smartcard daemon
190   - ./scripts :: Scripts needed by configure and others
191   - ./dirmngr :: The directory manager
192
193 ** Detailed Roadmap
194
195   This list of files is not up to date!
196
197   - g10/gpg.c :: Main module with option parsing and all the stuff you
198                  have to do on startup.  Also has the exit handler and
199                  some helper functions.
200
201   - g10/parse-packet.c ::
202   - g10/build-packet.c ::
203   - g10/free-packet.c :: Parsing and creating of OpenPGP message packets.
204
205   - g10/getkey.c   :: Key selection code
206   - g10/pkclist.c  :: Build a list of public keys
207   - g10/skclist.c  :: Build a list of secret keys
208   - g10/keyring.c  :: Keyring access functions
209   - g10/keydb.h    ::
210
211   - g10/keyid.c   :: Helper functions to get the keyid, fingerprint etc.
212
213   - g10/trustdb.c :: Web-of-Trust computations
214   - g10/trustdb.h ::
215   - g10/tdbdump.c :: Export/import/list the trustdb.gpg
216   - g10/tdbio.c   :: I/O handling for the trustdb.gpg
217   - g10/tdbio.h   ::
218
219   - g10/compress.c :: Filter to handle compression
220   - g10/filter.h   :: Declarations for all filter functions
221   - g10/delkey.c   :: Delete a key
222   - g10/kbnode.c   :: Helper for the kbnode_t linked list
223   - g10/main.h     :: Prototypes and some constants
224   - g10/mainproc.c :: Message processing
225   - g10/armor.c    :: Ascii armor filter
226   - g10/mdfilter.c :: Filter to calculate hashs
227   - g10/textfilter.c :: Filter to handle CR/LF and trailing white space
228   - g10/cipher.c   :: En-/Decryption filter
229   - g10/misc.c     :: Utlity functions
230   - g10/options.h  :: Structure with all the command line options
231                       and related constants
232   - g10/openfile.c :: Create/Open Files
233   - g10/keyserver.h :: Keyserver access dispatcher.
234   - g10/packet.h   :: Defintion of OpenPGP structures.
235   - g10/passphrase.c :: Passphrase handling code
236
237   - g10/pubkey-enc.c :: Process a public key encoded packet.
238   - g10/seckey-cert.c :: Not anymore used
239   - g10/seskey.c     :: Make sesssion keys etc.
240   - g10/import.c     :: Import keys into our key storage.
241   - g10/export.c     :: Export keys to the OpenPGP format.
242   - g10/sign.c       :: Create signature and optionally encrypt.
243   - g10/plaintext.c  :: Process plaintext packets.
244   - g10/decrypt-data.c :: Decrypt an encrypted data packet
245   - g10/encrypt.c    :: Main encryption driver
246   - g10/revoke.c     :: Create recovation certificates.
247   - g10/keylist.c    :: Print information about OpenPGP keys
248   - g10/sig-check.c  :: Check a signature
249   - g10/helptext.c   :: Show online help texts
250   - g10/verify.c     :: Verify signed data.
251   - g10/decrypt.c    :: Decrypt and verify data.
252   - g10/keyedit.c    :: Edit properties of a key.
253   - g10/dearmor.c    :: Armor utility.
254   - g10/keygen.c     :: Generate a key pair
255
256 ** Memory allocation
257
258 Use only the functions:
259
260  - xmalloc
261  - xmalloc_secure
262  - xtrymalloc
263  - xtrymalloc_secure
264  - xcalloc
265  - xcalloc_secure
266  - xtrycalloc
267  - xtrycalloc_secure
268  - xrealloc
269  - xtryrealloc
270  - xstrdup
271  - xtrystrdup
272  - xfree
273
274
275 The *secure versions allocate memory in the secure memory.  That is,
276 swapping out of this memory is avoided and is gets overwritten on
277 free.  Use this for passphrases, session keys and other sensitive
278 material.  This memory set aside for secure memory is linited to a few
279 k.  In general the function don't print a memeory message and
280 terminate the process if there is not enough memory available.  The
281 "try" versions of the functions return NULL instead.
282
283 ** Logging
284
285  TODO
286
287 ** Option parsing
288
289 GnuPG does not use getopt or GNU getopt but functions of it's own.
290 See util/argparse.c for details.  The advantage of these functions is
291 that it is more easy to display and maintain the help texts for the
292 options.  The same option table is also used to parse resource files.
293
294 ** What is an IOBUF
295
296 This is the data structure used for most I/O of gnupg. It is similar
297 to System┬áV Streams but much simpler.  Because OpenPGP messages are
298 nested in different ways; the use of such a system has big advantages.
299 Here is an example, how it works: If the parser sees a packet header
300 with a partial length, it pushes the block_filter onto the IOBUF to
301 handle these partial length packets: from now on you don't have to
302 worry about this.  When it sees a compressed packet it pushes the
303 uncompress filter and the next read byte is one which has already been
304 uncompressed by this filter. Same goes for enciphered packet,
305 plaintext packets and so on.  The file g10/encode.c might be a good
306 starting point to see how it is used - actually this is the other way:
307 constructing messages using pushed filters but it may be easier to
308 understand.
309
310