1b57d1a2cda6f55d368e12d22fe8fd694f27418b
[gnupg.git] / doc / gpgsm.texi
1 @c Copyright (C) 2002 Free Software Foundation, Inc.
2 @c This is part of the GnuPG manual.
3 @c For copying conditions, see the file gnupg.texi.
4
5 @node Invoking GPGSM
6 @chapter Invoking GPGSM
7 @cindex GPGSM command options
8 @cindex command options
9 @cindex options, GPGSM command
10
11 @manpage gpgsm.1
12 @ifset manverb
13 .B gpgsm
14 \- CMS encryption and signing tool
15 @end ifset
16
17 @mansect synopsis
18 @ifset manverb
19 .B  gpgsm
20 .RB [ \-\-homedir
21 .IR dir ]
22 .RB [ \-\-options
23 .IR file ]
24 .RI [ options ]
25 .I command
26 .RI [ args ]
27 @end ifset
28
29
30 @mansect description
31 @command{gpgsm} is a tool similar to @command{gpg} to provide digital
32 encryption and signing services on X.509 certificates and the CMS
33 protocol.  It is mainly used as a backend for S/MIME mail processing.
34 @command{gpgsm} includes a full featured certificate management and
35 complies with all rules defined for the German Sphinx project.
36
37 @manpause
38 @xref{Option Index}, for an index to @command{GPGSM}'s commands and options.
39 @mancont
40
41 @menu
42 * GPGSM Commands::        List of all commands.
43 * GPGSM Options::         List of all options.
44 * GPGSM Configuration::   Configuration files.
45 * GPGSM Examples::        Some usage examples.
46
47 Developer information:
48 * Unattended Usage::      Using @command{gpgsm} from other programs.
49 * GPGSM Protocol::        The protocol the server mode uses.
50 @end menu
51
52 @c *******************************************
53 @c ***************            ****************
54 @c ***************  COMMANDS  ****************
55 @c ***************            ****************
56 @c *******************************************
57 @mansect commands
58 @node GPGSM Commands
59 @section Commands
60
61 Commands are not distinguished from options except for the fact that
62 only one command is allowed.
63
64 @menu
65 * General GPGSM Commands::        Commands not specific to the functionality.
66 * Operational GPGSM Commands::    Commands to select the type of operation.
67 * Certificate Management::        How to manage certificates.
68 @end menu
69
70
71 @c *******************************************
72 @c **********  GENERAL COMMANDS  *************
73 @c *******************************************
74 @node General GPGSM Commands
75 @subsection Commands not specific to the function
76
77 @table @gnupgtabopt
78 @item --version
79 @opindex version
80 Print the program version and licensing information.  Note that you
81 cannot abbreviate this command.
82
83 @item --help, -h
84 @opindex help
85 Print a usage message summarizing the most useful command-line options.
86 Note that you cannot abbreviate this command.
87
88 @item --warranty
89 @opindex warranty
90 Print warranty information.  Note that you cannot abbreviate this
91 command.
92
93 @item --dump-options
94 @opindex dump-options
95 Print a list of all available options and commands.  Note that you cannot
96 abbreviate this command.
97 @end table
98
99
100 @c *******************************************
101 @c ********  OPERATIONAL COMMANDS  ***********
102 @c *******************************************
103 @node Operational GPGSM Commands
104 @subsection Commands to select the type of operation
105
106 @table @gnupgtabopt
107 @item --encrypt
108 @opindex encrypt
109 Perform an encryption.  The keys the data is encrypted too must be set
110 using the option @option{--recipient}.
111
112 @item --decrypt
113 @opindex decrypt
114 Perform a decryption; the type of input is automatically determined.  It
115 may either be in binary form or PEM encoded; automatic determination of
116 base-64 encoding is not done.
117
118 @item --sign
119 @opindex sign
120 Create a digital signature.  The key used is either the fist one found
121 in the keybox or those set with the @option{--local-user} option.
122
123 @item --verify
124 @opindex verify
125 Check a signature file for validity.  Depending on the arguments a
126 detached signature may also be checked.
127
128 @item --server
129 @opindex server
130 Run in server mode and wait for commands on the @code{stdin}.
131
132 @item --call-dirmngr @var{command} [@var{args}]
133 @opindex call-dirmngr
134 Behave as a Dirmngr client issuing the request @var{command} with the
135 optional list of @var{args}.  The output of the Dirmngr is printed
136 stdout.  Please note that file names given as arguments should have an
137 absolute file name (i.e. commencing with @code{/} because they are
138 passed verbatim to the Dirmngr and the working directory of the
139 Dirmngr might not be the same as the one of this client.  Currently it
140 is not possible to pass data via stdin to the Dirmngr.  @var{command}
141 should not contain spaces.
142
143 This is command is required for certain maintaining tasks of the dirmngr
144 where a dirmngr must be able to call back to @command{gpgsm}.  See the Dirmngr
145 manual for details.
146
147 @item --call-protect-tool @var{arguments}
148 @opindex call-protect-tool
149 Certain maintenance operations are done by an external program call
150 @command{gpg-protect-tool}; this is usually not installed in a directory
151 listed in the PATH variable.  This command provides a simple wrapper to
152 access this tool.  @var{arguments} are passed verbatim to this command;
153 use @samp{--help} to get a list of supported operations.
154
155
156 @end table
157
158
159 @c *******************************************
160 @c *******  CERTIFICATE MANAGEMENT  **********
161 @c *******************************************
162 @node Certificate Management
163 @subsection How to manage the certificates and keys
164
165 @table @gnupgtabopt
166 @item --gen-key
167 @opindex gen-key
168 This command allows the creation of a certificate signing request or a
169 self-signed certificate.  It is commonly used along with the
170 @option{--output} option to save the created CSR or certificate into a
171 file.  If used with the @option{--batch} a parameter file is used to
172 create the CSR or certificate and it is further possible to create
173 non-self-signed certificates.
174
175 @item --list-keys
176 @itemx -k
177 @opindex list-keys
178 List all available certificates stored in the local key database.
179 Note that the displayed data might be reformatted for better human
180 readability and illegal characters are replaced by safe substitutes.
181
182 @item --list-secret-keys
183 @itemx -K
184 @opindex list-secret-keys
185 List all available certificates for which a corresponding a secret key
186 is available.
187
188 @item --list-external-keys @var{pattern}
189 @opindex list-keys
190 List certificates matching @var{pattern} using an external server.  This
191 utilizes the @code{dirmngr} service.
192
193 @item --list-chain
194 @opindex list-chain
195 Same as @option{--list-keys} but also prints all keys making up the chain.
196
197
198 @item --dump-cert
199 @itemx --dump-keys
200 @opindex dump-cert
201 @opindex dump-keys
202 List all available certificates stored in the local key database using a
203 format useful mainly for debugging.
204
205 @item --dump-chain
206 @opindex dump-chain
207 Same as @option{--dump-keys} but also prints all keys making up the chain.
208
209 @item --dump-secret-keys
210 @opindex dump-secret-keys
211 List all available certificates for which a corresponding a secret key
212 is available using a format useful mainly for debugging.
213
214 @item --dump-external-keys @var{pattern}
215 @opindex dump-external-keys
216 List certificates matching @var{pattern} using an external server.
217 This utilizes the @code{dirmngr} service.  It uses a format useful
218 mainly for debugging.
219
220 @item --keydb-clear-some-cert-flags
221 @opindex keydb-clear-some-cert-flags
222 This is a debugging aid to reset certain flags in the key database
223 which are used to cache certain certificate stati.  It is especially
224 useful if a bad CRL or a weird running OCSP responder did accidentally
225 revoke certificate.  There is no security issue with this command
226 because @command{gpgsm} always make sure that the validity of a certificate is
227 checked right before it is used.
228
229 @item --delete-keys @var{pattern}
230 @opindex delete-keys
231 Delete the keys matching @var{pattern}.  Note that there is no command
232 to delete the secret part of the key directly.  In case you need to do
233 this, you should run the command @code{gpgsm --dump-secret-keys KEYID}
234 before you delete the key, copy the string of hex-digits in the
235 ``keygrip'' line and delete the file consisting of these hex-digits
236 and the suffix @code{.key} from the @file{private-keys-v1.d} directory
237 below our GnuPG home directory (usually @file{~/.gnupg}).
238
239 @item --export [@var{pattern}]
240 @opindex export
241 Export all certificates stored in the Keybox or those specified by the
242 optional @var{pattern}. Those pattern consist of a list of user ids
243 (@pxref{how-to-specify-a-user-id}).  When used along with the
244 @option{--armor} option a few informational lines are prepended before
245 each block.  There is one limitation: As there is no commonly agreed
246 upon way to pack more than one certificate into an ASN.1 structure,
247 the binary export (i.e. without using @option{armor}) works only for
248 the export of one certificate.  Thus it is required to specify a
249 @var{pattern} which yields exactly one certificate.  Ephemeral
250 certificate are only exported if all @var{pattern} are given as
251 fingerprints or keygrips.
252
253 @item --export-secret-key-p12 @var{key-id}
254 @opindex export-secret-key-p12
255 Export the private key and the certificate identified by @var{key-id} in
256 a PKCS#12 format. When used with the @code{--armor} option a few
257 informational lines are prepended to the output.  Note, that the PKCS#12
258 format is not very secure and this command is only provided if there is
259 no other way to exchange the private key. (@pxref{option --p12-charset})
260
261 @item --export-secret-key-p8 @var{key-id}
262 @itemx --export-secret-key-raw @var{key-id}
263 @opindex export-secret-key-p8
264 @opindex export-secret-key-raw
265 Export the private key of the certificate identified by @var{key-id}
266 with any encryption stripped.  The @code{...-raw} command exports in
267 PKCS#1 format; the @code{...-p8} command exports in PKCS#8 format.
268 When used with the @code{--armor} option a few informational lines are
269 prepended to the output.  These commands are useful to prepare a key
270 for use on a TLS server.
271
272 @item --import [@var{files}]
273 @opindex import
274 Import the certificates from the PEM or binary encoded files as well as
275 from signed-only messages.  This command may also be used to import a
276 secret key from a PKCS#12 file.
277
278 @item --learn-card
279 @opindex learn-card
280 Read information about the private keys from the smartcard and import
281 the certificates from there.  This command utilizes the @command{gpg-agent}
282 and in turn the @command{scdaemon}.
283
284 @item --passwd @var{user_id}
285 @opindex passwd
286 Change the passphrase of the private key belonging to the certificate
287 specified as @var{user_id}.  Note, that changing the passphrase/PIN of a
288 smartcard is not yet supported.
289
290 @end table
291
292
293 @c *******************************************
294 @c ***************            ****************
295 @c ***************  OPTIONS   ****************
296 @c ***************            ****************
297 @c *******************************************
298 @mansect options
299 @node GPGSM Options
300 @section Option Summary
301
302 @command{GPGSM} features a bunch of options to control the exact behaviour
303 and to change the default configuration.
304
305 @menu
306 * Configuration Options::   How to change the configuration.
307 * Certificate Options::     Certificate related options.
308 * Input and Output::        Input and Output.
309 * CMS Options::             How to change how the CMS is created.
310 * Esoteric Options::        Doing things one usually do not want to do.
311 @end menu
312
313
314 @c *******************************************
315 @c ********  CONFIGURATION OPTIONS  **********
316 @c *******************************************
317 @node Configuration Options
318 @subsection How to change the configuration
319
320 These options are used to change the configuration and are usually found
321 in the option file.
322
323 @table @gnupgtabopt
324
325 @anchor{gpgsm-option --options}
326 @item --options @var{file}
327 @opindex options
328 Reads configuration from @var{file} instead of from the default
329 per-user configuration file.  The default configuration file is named
330 @file{gpgsm.conf} and expected in the @file{.gnupg} directory directly
331 below the home directory of the user.
332
333 @include opt-homedir.texi
334
335
336 @item -v
337 @item --verbose
338 @opindex v
339 @opindex verbose
340 Outputs additional information while running.
341 You can increase the verbosity by giving several
342 verbose commands to @command{gpgsm}, such as @samp{-vv}.
343
344 @item --policy-file @var{filename}
345 @opindex policy-file
346 Change the default name of the policy file to @var{filename}.
347
348 @item --agent-program @var{file}
349 @opindex agent-program
350 Specify an agent program to be used for secret key operations.  The
351 default value is determined by running the command @command{gpgconf}.
352 Note that the pipe symbol (@code{|}) is used for a regression test
353 suite hack and may thus not be used in the file name.
354
355 @item --dirmngr-program @var{file}
356 @opindex dirmngr-program
357 Specify a dirmngr program to be used for @acronym{CRL} checks.  The
358 default value is @file{/usr/sbin/dirmngr}.  This is only used as a
359 fallback when the environment variable @code{DIRMNGR_INFO} is not set or
360 a running dirmngr cannot be connected.
361
362 @item --prefer-system-dirmngr
363 @opindex prefer-system-dirmngr
364 If a system wide @command{dirmngr} is running in daemon mode, first try
365 to connect to this one.  Fallback to a pipe based server if this does
366 not work.  Under Windows this option is ignored because the system dirmngr is
367 always used.
368
369 @item --disable-dirmngr
370 Entirely disable the use of the Dirmngr.
371
372 @item --no-autostart
373 @opindex no-autostart
374 Do not start the gpg-agent or the dirmngr if it has not yet been
375 started and its service is required.  This option is mostly useful on
376 machines where the connection to gpg-agent has been redirected to
377 another machines.  If dirmngr is required on the remote machine, it
378 may be started manually using @command{gpgconf --launch dirmngr}.
379
380 @item --no-secmem-warning
381 @opindex no-secmem-warning
382 Do not print a warning when the so called "secure memory" cannot be used.
383
384 @item --log-file @var{file}
385 @opindex log-file
386 When running in server mode, append all logging output to @var{file}.
387
388 @end table
389
390
391 @c *******************************************
392 @c ********  CERTIFICATE OPTIONS  ************
393 @c *******************************************
394 @node Certificate Options
395 @subsection Certificate related options
396
397 @table @gnupgtabopt
398
399 @item  --enable-policy-checks
400 @itemx --disable-policy-checks
401 @opindex enable-policy-checks
402 @opindex disable-policy-checks
403 By default policy checks are enabled.  These options may be used to
404 change it.
405
406 @item  --enable-crl-checks
407 @itemx --disable-crl-checks
408 @opindex enable-crl-checks
409 @opindex disable-crl-checks
410 By default the @acronym{CRL} checks are enabled and the DirMngr is used
411 to check for revoked certificates.  The disable option is most useful
412 with an off-line network connection to suppress this check.
413
414 @item  --enable-trusted-cert-crl-check
415 @itemx --disable-trusted-cert-crl-check
416 @opindex enable-trusted-cert-crl-check
417 @opindex disable-trusted-cert-crl-check
418 By default the @acronym{CRL} for trusted root certificates are checked
419 like for any other certificates.  This allows a CA to revoke its own
420 certificates voluntary without the need of putting all ever issued
421 certificates into a CRL.  The disable option may be used to switch this
422 extra check off.  Due to the caching done by the Dirmngr, there will not be
423 any noticeable performance gain.  Note, that this also disables possible
424 OCSP checks for trusted root certificates.  A more specific way of
425 disabling this check is by adding the ``relax'' keyword to the root CA
426 line of the @file{trustlist.txt}
427
428
429 @item --force-crl-refresh
430 @opindex force-crl-refresh
431 Tell the dirmngr to reload the CRL for each request.  For better
432 performance, the dirmngr will actually optimize this by suppressing
433 the loading for short time intervals (e.g. 30 minutes). This option
434 is useful to make sure that a fresh CRL is available for certificates
435 hold in the keybox.  The suggested way of doing this is by using it
436 along with the option @option{--with-validation} for a key listing
437 command.  This option should not be used in a configuration file.
438
439 @item  --enable-ocsp
440 @itemx --disable-ocsp
441 @opindex enable-ocsp
442 @opindex disable-ocsp
443 By default @acronym{OCSP} checks are disabled.  The enable option may
444 be used to enable OCSP checks via Dirmngr.  If @acronym{CRL} checks
445 are also enabled, CRLs will be used as a fallback if for some reason an
446 OCSP request will not succeed.  Note, that you have to allow OCSP
447 requests in Dirmngr's configuration too (option
448 @option{--allow-ocsp}) and configure Dirmngr properly.  If you do not do
449 so you will get the error code @samp{Not supported}.
450
451 @item --auto-issuer-key-retrieve
452 @opindex auto-issuer-key-retrieve
453 If a required certificate is missing while validating the chain of
454 certificates, try to load that certificate from an external location.
455 This usually means that Dirmngr is employed to search for the
456 certificate.  Note that this option makes a "web bug" like behavior
457 possible.  LDAP server operators can see which keys you request, so by
458 sending you a message signed by a brand new key (which you naturally
459 will not have on your local keybox), the operator can tell both your IP
460 address and the time when you verified the signature.
461
462
463 @item --validation-model @var{name}
464 @opindex validation-model
465 This option changes the default validation model.  The only possible
466 values are "shell" (which is the default), "chain" which forces the
467 use of the chain model and "steed" for a new simplified model.  The
468 chain model is also used if an option in the @file{trustlist.txt} or
469 an attribute of the certificate requests it.  However the standard
470 model (shell) is in that case always tried first.
471
472 @item --ignore-cert-extension @var{oid}
473 @opindex ignore-cert-extension
474 Add @var{oid} to the list of ignored certificate extensions.  The
475 @var{oid} is expected to be in dotted decimal form, like
476 @code{2.5.29.3}.  This option may be used more than once.  Critical
477 flagged certificate extensions matching one of the OIDs in the list
478 are treated as if they are actually handled and thus the certificate
479 will not be rejected due to an unknown critical extension.  Use this
480 option with care because extensions are usually flagged as critical
481 for a reason.
482
483 @end table
484
485 @c *******************************************
486 @c ***********  INPUT AND OUTPUT  ************
487 @c *******************************************
488 @node Input and Output
489 @subsection Input and Output
490
491 @table @gnupgtabopt
492 @item --armor
493 @itemx -a
494 @opindex armor
495 Create PEM encoded output.  Default is binary output.
496
497 @item --base64
498 @opindex base64
499 Create Base-64 encoded output; i.e. PEM without the header lines.
500
501 @item --assume-armor
502 @opindex assume-armor
503 Assume the input data is PEM encoded.  Default is to autodetect the
504 encoding but this is may fail.
505
506 @item --assume-base64
507 @opindex assume-base64
508 Assume the input data is plain base-64 encoded.
509
510 @item --assume-binary
511 @opindex assume-binary
512 Assume the input data is binary encoded.
513
514 @anchor{option --p12-charset}
515 @item --p12-charset @var{name}
516 @opindex p12-charset
517 @command{gpgsm} uses the UTF-8 encoding when encoding passphrases for
518 PKCS#12 files.  This option may be used to force the passphrase to be
519 encoded in the specified encoding @var{name}.  This is useful if the
520 application used to import the key uses a different encoding and thus
521 will not be able to import a file generated by @command{gpgsm}.  Commonly
522 used values for @var{name} are @code{Latin1} and @code{CP850}.  Note
523 that @command{gpgsm} itself automagically imports any file with a
524 passphrase encoded to the most commonly used encodings.
525
526
527 @item --default-key @var{user_id}
528 @opindex default-key
529 Use @var{user_id} as the standard key for signing.  This key is used if
530 no other key has been defined as a signing key.  Note, that the first
531 @option{--local-users} option also sets this key if it has not yet been
532 set; however @option{--default-key} always overrides this.
533
534
535 @item --local-user @var{user_id}
536 @item -u @var{user_id}
537 @opindex local-user
538 Set the user(s) to be used for signing.  The default is the first
539 secret key found in the database.
540
541
542 @item --recipient @var{name}
543 @itemx -r
544 @opindex recipient
545 Encrypt to the user id @var{name}.  There are several ways a user id
546 may be given (@pxref{how-to-specify-a-user-id}).
547
548
549 @item --output @var{file}
550 @itemx -o @var{file}
551 @opindex output
552 Write output to @var{file}.  The default is to write it to stdout.
553
554
555 @item --with-key-data
556 @opindex with-key-data
557 Displays extra information with the @code{--list-keys} commands.  Especially
558 a line tagged @code{grp} is printed which tells you the keygrip of a
559 key.  This string is for example used as the file name of the
560 secret key.
561
562 @item --with-validation
563 @opindex with-validation
564 When doing a key listing, do a full validation check for each key and
565 print the result.  This is usually a slow operation because it
566 requires a CRL lookup and other operations.
567
568 When used along with --import, a validation of the certificate to
569 import is done and only imported if it succeeds the test.  Note that
570 this does not affect an already available certificate in the DB.
571 This option is therefore useful to simply verify a certificate.
572
573
574 @item --with-md5-fingerprint
575 For standard key listings, also print the MD5 fingerprint of the
576 certificate.
577
578 @item --with-keygrip
579 Include the keygrip in standard key listings.  Note that the keygrip is
580 always listed in --with-colons mode.
581
582 @item --with-secret
583 @opindex with-secret
584 Include info about the presence of a secret key in public key listings
585 done with @code{--with-colons}.
586
587 @end table
588
589 @c *******************************************
590 @c *************  CMS OPTIONS  ***************
591 @c *******************************************
592 @node CMS Options
593 @subsection How to change how the CMS is created.
594
595 @table @gnupgtabopt
596 @item --include-certs @var{n}
597 @opindex include-certs
598 Using @var{n} of -2 includes all certificate except for the root cert,
599 -1 includes all certs, 0 does not include any certs, 1 includes only the
600 signers cert and all other positive values include up to @var{n}
601 certificates starting with the signer cert.  The default is -2.
602
603 @item --cipher-algo @var{oid}
604 @opindex cipher-algo
605 Use the cipher algorithm with the ASN.1 object identifier @var{oid} for
606 encryption.  For convenience the strings @code{3DES}, @code{AES} and
607 @code{AES256} may be used instead of their OIDs.  The default is
608 @code{AES} (2.16.840.1.101.3.4.1.2).
609
610 @item --digest-algo @code{name}
611 Use @code{name} as the message digest algorithm.  Usually this
612 algorithm is deduced from the respective signing certificate.  This
613 option forces the use of the given algorithm and may lead to severe
614 interoperability problems.
615
616 @end table
617
618
619
620 @c *******************************************
621 @c ********  ESOTERIC OPTIONS  ***************
622 @c *******************************************
623 @node Esoteric Options
624 @subsection Doing things one usually do not want to do.
625
626
627 @table @gnupgtabopt
628
629 @item --extra-digest-algo @var{name}
630 @opindex extra-digest-algo
631 Sometimes signatures are broken in that they announce a different digest
632 algorithm than actually used.  @command{gpgsm} uses a one-pass data
633 processing model and thus needs to rely on the announced digest
634 algorithms to properly hash the data.  As a workaround this option may
635 be used to tell gpg to also hash the data using the algorithm
636 @var{name}; this slows processing down a little bit but allows to verify
637 such broken signatures.  If @command{gpgsm} prints an error like
638 ``digest algo 8 has not been enabled'' you may want to try this option,
639 with @samp{SHA256} for @var{name}.
640
641
642 @item --faked-system-time @var{epoch}
643 @opindex faked-system-time
644 This option is only useful for testing; it sets the system time back or
645 forth to @var{epoch} which is the number of seconds elapsed since the year
646 1970.  Alternatively @var{epoch} may be given as a full ISO time string
647 (e.g. "20070924T154812").
648
649 @item --with-ephemeral-keys
650 @opindex with-ephemeral-keys
651 Include ephemeral flagged keys in the output of key listings.  Note
652 that they are included anyway if the key specification for a listing
653 is given as fingerprint or keygrip.
654
655 @item --debug-level @var{level}
656 @opindex debug-level
657 Select the debug level for investigating problems. @var{level} may be
658 a numeric value or by a keyword:
659
660 @table @code
661 @item none
662 No debugging at all.  A value of less than 1 may be used instead of
663 the keyword.
664 @item basic
665 Some basic debug messages.  A value between 1 and 2 may be used
666 instead of the keyword.
667 @item advanced
668 More verbose debug messages.  A value between 3 and 5 may be used
669 instead of the keyword.
670 @item expert
671 Even more detailed messages.  A value between 6 and 8 may be used
672 instead of the keyword.
673 @item guru
674 All of the debug messages you can get. A value greater than 8 may be
675 used instead of the keyword.  The creation of hash tracing files is
676 only enabled if the keyword is used.
677 @end table
678
679 How these messages are mapped to the actual debugging flags is not
680 specified and may change with newer releases of this program. They are
681 however carefully selected to best aid in debugging.
682
683 @item --debug @var{flags}
684 @opindex debug
685 This option is only useful for debugging and the behaviour may change
686 at any time without notice; using @code{--debug-levels} is the
687 preferred method to select the debug verbosity.  FLAGS are bit encoded
688 and may be given in usual C-Syntax. The currently defined bits are:
689
690 @table @code
691 @item 0  (1)
692 X.509 or OpenPGP protocol related data
693 @item 1  (2)
694 values of big number integers
695 @item 2  (4)
696 low level crypto operations
697 @item 5  (32)
698 memory allocation
699 @item 6  (64)
700 caching
701 @item 7  (128)
702 show memory statistics.
703 @item 9  (512)
704 write hashed data to files named @code{dbgmd-000*}
705 @item 10 (1024)
706 trace Assuan protocol
707 @end table
708
709 Note, that all flags set using this option may get overridden by
710 @code{--debug-level}.
711
712 @item --debug-all
713 @opindex debug-all
714 Same as @code{--debug=0xffffffff}
715
716 @item --debug-allow-core-dump
717 @opindex debug-allow-core-dump
718 Usually @command{gpgsm} tries to avoid dumping core by well written code and by
719 disabling core dumps for security reasons.  However, bugs are pretty
720 durable beasts and to squash them it is sometimes useful to have a core
721 dump.  This option enables core dumps unless the Bad Thing happened
722 before the option parsing.
723
724 @item --debug-no-chain-validation
725 @opindex debug-no-chain-validation
726 This is actually not a debugging option but only useful as such.  It
727 lets @command{gpgsm} bypass all certificate chain validation checks.
728
729 @item --debug-ignore-expiration
730 @opindex debug-ignore-expiration
731 This is actually not a debugging option but only useful as such.  It
732 lets @command{gpgsm} ignore all notAfter dates, this is used by the regression
733 tests.
734
735 @item --fixed-passphrase @var{string}
736 @opindex fixed-passphrase
737 Supply the passphrase @var{string} to the gpg-protect-tool.  This
738 option is only useful for the regression tests included with this
739 package and may be revised or removed at any time without notice.
740
741 @item --no-common-certs-import
742 @opindex no-common-certs-import
743 Suppress the import of common certificates on keybox creation.
744
745 @end table
746
747 All the long options may also be given in the configuration file after
748 stripping off the two leading dashes.
749
750 @c *******************************************
751 @c ***************            ****************
752 @c ***************  USER ID   ****************
753 @c ***************            ****************
754 @c *******************************************
755 @mansect how to specify a user id
756 @ifset isman
757 @include specify-user-id.texi
758 @end ifset
759
760 @c *******************************************
761 @c ***************            ****************
762 @c ***************   FILES    ****************
763 @c ***************            ****************
764 @c *******************************************
765 @mansect files
766 @node GPGSM Configuration
767 @section Configuration files
768
769 There are a few configuration files to control certain aspects of
770 @command{gpgsm}'s operation. Unless noted, they are expected in the
771 current home directory (@pxref{option --homedir}).
772
773 @table @file
774
775 @item gpgsm.conf
776 @cindex gpgsm.conf
777 This is the standard configuration file read by @command{gpgsm} on
778 startup.  It may contain any valid long option; the leading two dashes
779 may not be entered and the option may not be abbreviated.  This default
780 name may be changed on the command line (@pxref{gpgsm-option --options}).
781 You should backup this file.
782
783
784 @item policies.txt
785 @cindex policies.txt
786 This is a list of allowed CA policies.  This file should list the
787 object identifiers of the policies line by line.  Empty lines and
788 lines starting with a hash mark are ignored.  Policies missing in this
789 file and not marked as critical in the certificate will print only a
790 warning; certificates with policies marked as critical and not listed
791 in this file will fail the signature verification.  You should backup
792 this file.
793
794 For example, to allow only the policy 2.289.9.9, the file should look
795 like this:
796
797 @c man:.RS
798 @example
799 # Allowed policies
800 2.289.9.9
801 @end example
802 @c man:.RE
803
804 @item qualified.txt
805 @cindex qualified.txt
806 This is the list of root certificates used for qualified certificates.
807 They are defined as certificates capable of creating legally binding
808 signatures in the same way as handwritten signatures are.  Comments
809 start with a hash mark and empty lines are ignored.  Lines do have a
810 length limit but this is not a serious limitation as the format of the
811 entries is fixed and checked by gpgsm: A non-comment line starts with
812 optional whitespace, followed by exactly 40 hex character, white space
813 and a lowercased 2 letter country code.  Additional data delimited with
814 by a white space is current ignored but might late be used for other
815 purposes.
816
817 Note that even if a certificate is listed in this file, this does not
818 mean that the certificate is trusted; in general the certificates listed
819 in this file need to be listed also in @file{trustlist.txt}.
820
821 This is a global file an installed in the data directory
822 (e.g. @file{/usr/share/gnupg/qualified.txt}).  GnuPG installs a suitable
823 file with root certificates as used in Germany.  As new Root-CA
824 certificates may be issued over time, these entries may need to be
825 updated; new distributions of this software should come with an updated
826 list but it is still the responsibility of the Administrator to check
827 that this list is correct.
828
829 Everytime @command{gpgsm} uses a certificate for signing or verification
830 this file will be consulted to check whether the certificate under
831 question has ultimately been issued by one of these CAs.  If this is the
832 case the user will be informed that the verified signature represents a
833 legally binding (``qualified'') signature.  When creating a signature
834 using such a certificate an extra prompt will be issued to let the user
835 confirm that such a legally binding signature shall really be created.
836
837 Because this software has not yet been approved for use with such
838 certificates, appropriate notices will be shown to indicate this fact.
839
840 @item help.txt
841 @cindex help.txt
842 This is plain text file with a few help entries used with
843 @command{pinentry} as well as a large list of help items for
844 @command{gpg} and @command{gpgsm}.  The standard file has English help
845 texts; to install localized versions use filenames like @file{help.LL.txt}
846 with LL denoting the locale.  GnuPG comes with a set of predefined help
847 files in the data directory (e.g. @file{/usr/share/gnupg/help.de.txt})
848 and allows overriding of any help item by help files stored in the
849 system configuration directory (e.g. @file{/etc/gnupg/help.de.txt}).
850 For a reference of the help file's syntax, please see the installed
851 @file{help.txt} file.
852
853
854 @item com-certs.pem
855 @cindex com-certs.pem
856 This file is a collection of common certificates used to populated a
857 newly created @file{pubring.kbx}.  An administrator may replace this
858 file with a custom one.  The format is a concatenation of PEM encoded
859 X.509 certificates.  This global file is installed in the data directory
860 (e.g. @file{/usr/share/gnupg/com-certs.pem}).
861
862 @end table
863
864 @c man:.RE
865 Note that on larger installations, it is useful to put predefined files
866 into the directory @file{/etc/skel/.gnupg/} so that newly created users
867 start up with a working configuration.  For existing users a small
868 helper script is provided to create these files (@pxref{addgnupghome}).
869
870 For internal purposes gpgsm creates and maintains a few other files;
871 they all live in in the current home directory (@pxref{option
872 --homedir}).  Only @command{gpgsm} may modify these files.
873
874
875 @table @file
876 @item pubring.kbx
877 @cindex pubring.kbx
878 This a database file storing the certificates as well as meta
879 information.  For debugging purposes the tool @command{kbxutil} may be
880 used to show the internal structure of this file.  You should backup
881 this file.
882
883 @item random_seed
884 @cindex random_seed
885 This content of this file is used to maintain the internal state of the
886 random number generator across invocations.  The same file is used by
887 other programs of this software too.
888
889 @item S.gpg-agent
890 @cindex S.gpg-agent
891 If this file exists
892 @command{gpgsm} will first try to connect to this socket for
893 accessing @command{gpg-agent} before starting a new @command{gpg-agent}
894 instance.  Under Windows this socket (which in reality be a plain file
895 describing a regular TCP listening port) is the standard way of
896 connecting the @command{gpg-agent}.
897
898 @end table
899
900
901 @c *******************************************
902 @c ***************            ****************
903 @c ***************  EXAMPLES  ****************
904 @c ***************            ****************
905 @c *******************************************
906 @mansect examples
907 @node GPGSM Examples
908 @section Examples
909
910 @example
911 $ gpgsm -er goo@@bar.net <plaintext >ciphertext
912 @end example
913
914
915 @c *******************************************
916 @c ***************              **************
917 @c ***************  UNATTENDED  **************
918 @c ***************              **************
919 @c *******************************************
920 @manpause
921 @node Unattended Usage
922 @section Unattended Usage
923
924 @command{gpgsm} is often used as a backend engine by other software.  To help
925 with this a machine interface has been defined to have an unambiguous
926 way to do this.  This is most likely used with the @code{--server} command
927 but may also be used in the standard operation mode by using the
928 @code{--status-fd} option.
929
930 @menu
931 * Automated signature checking::  Automated signature checking.
932 * CSR and certificate creation::  CSR and certificate creation.
933 @end menu
934
935 @node Automated signature checking
936 @subsection Automated signature checking
937
938 It is very important to understand the semantics used with signature
939 verification.  Checking a signature is not as simple as it may sound and
940 so the operation is a bit complicated.  In most cases it is required
941 to look at several status lines.  Here is a table of all cases a signed
942 message may have:
943
944 @table @asis
945 @item The signature is valid
946 This does mean that the signature has been successfully verified, the
947 certificates are all sane.  However there are two subcases with
948 important information:  One of the certificates may have expired or a
949 signature of a message itself as expired.  It is a sound practise to
950 consider such a signature still as valid but additional information
951 should be displayed.  Depending on the subcase @command{gpgsm} will issue
952 these status codes:
953   @table @asis
954   @item signature valid and nothing did expire
955   @code{GOODSIG}, @code{VALIDSIG}, @code{TRUST_FULLY}
956   @item signature valid but at least one certificate has expired
957   @code{EXPKEYSIG}, @code{VALIDSIG}, @code{TRUST_FULLY}
958   @item signature valid but expired
959   @code{EXPSIG}, @code{VALIDSIG}, @code{TRUST_FULLY}
960   Note, that this case is currently not implemented.
961   @end table
962
963 @item The signature is invalid
964 This means that the signature verification failed (this is an indication
965 of af a transfer error, a program error or tampering with the message).
966 @command{gpgsm} issues one of these status codes sequences:
967   @table @code
968   @item  @code{BADSIG}
969   @item  @code{GOODSIG}, @code{VALIDSIG} @code{TRUST_NEVER}
970   @end table
971
972 @item Error verifying a signature
973 For some reason the signature could not be verified, i.e. it cannot be
974 decided whether the signature is valid or invalid.  A common reason for
975 this is a missing certificate.
976
977 @end table
978
979 @node CSR and certificate creation
980 @subsection CSR and certificate creation
981
982 The command @option{--gen-key} may be used along with the option
983 @option{--batch} to either create a certificate signing request (CSR)
984 or an X.509 certificate.  This is controlled by a parameter file; the
985 format of this file is as follows:
986
987 @itemize @bullet
988 @item Text only, line length is limited to about 1000 characters.
989 @item UTF-8 encoding must be used to specify non-ASCII characters.
990 @item Empty lines are ignored.
991 @item Leading and trailing while space is ignored.
992 @item A hash sign as the first non white space character indicates
993 a comment line.
994 @item Control statements are indicated by a leading percent sign, the
995 arguments are separated by white space from the keyword.
996 @item Parameters are specified by a keyword, followed by a colon.  Arguments
997 are separated by white space.
998 @item The first parameter must be @samp{Key-Type}, control statements
999 may be placed anywhere.
1000 @item
1001 The order of the parameters does not matter except for @samp{Key-Type}
1002 which must be the first parameter.  The parameters are only used for
1003 the generated CSR/certificate; parameters from previous sets are not
1004 used.  Some syntactically checks may be performed.
1005 @item
1006 Key generation takes place when either the end of the parameter file
1007 is reached, the next @samp{Key-Type} parameter is encountered or at the
1008 control statement @samp{%commit} is encountered.
1009 @end itemize
1010
1011 @noindent
1012 Control statements:
1013
1014 @table @asis
1015
1016 @item %echo @var{text}
1017 Print @var{text} as diagnostic.
1018
1019 @item %dry-run
1020 Suppress actual key generation (useful for syntax checking).
1021
1022 @item %commit
1023 Perform the key generation.  Note that an implicit commit is done at
1024 the next @asis{Key-Type} parameter.
1025
1026 @c  %certfile <filename>
1027 @c      [Not yet implemented!]
1028 @c      Do not write the certificate to the keyDB but to <filename>.
1029 @c      This must be given before the first
1030 @c      commit to take place, duplicate specification of the same filename
1031 @c      is ignored, the last filename before a commit is used.
1032 @c      The filename is used until a new filename is used (at commit points)
1033 @c      and all keys are written to that file.  If a new filename is given,
1034 @c      this file is created (and overwrites an existing one).
1035 @c      Both control statements must be given.
1036 @end table
1037
1038 @noindent
1039 General Parameters:
1040
1041 @table @asis
1042
1043 @item Key-Type: @var{algo}
1044 Starts a new parameter block by giving the type of the primary
1045 key. The algorithm must be capable of signing.  This is a required
1046 parameter.  The only supported value for @var{algo} is @samp{rsa}.
1047
1048 @item Key-Length: @var{nbits}
1049 The requested length of a generated key in bits.  Defaults to 2048.
1050
1051 @item Key-Grip: @var{hexstring}
1052 This is optional and used to generate a CSR or certificatet for an
1053 already existing key.  Key-Length will be ignored when given.
1054
1055 @item Key-Usage: @var{usage-list}
1056 Space or comma delimited list of key usage, allowed values are
1057 @samp{encrypt}, @samp{sign} and @samp{cert}.  This is used to generate
1058 the keyUsage extension.  Please make sure that the algorithm is
1059 capable of this usage.  Default is to allow encrypt and sign.
1060
1061 @item Name-DN: @var{subject-name}
1062 This is the Distinguished Name (DN) of the subject in RFC-2253 format.
1063
1064 @item Name-Email: @var{string}
1065 This is an email address for the altSubjectName.  This parameter is
1066 optional but may occur several times to add several email addresses to
1067 a certificate.
1068
1069 @item Name-DNS: @var{string}
1070 The is an DNS name for the altSubjectName.  This parameter is optional
1071 but may occur several times to add several DNS names to a certificate.
1072
1073 @item Name-URI: @var{string}
1074 This is an URI for the altSubjectName.  This parameter is optional but
1075 may occur several times to add several URIs to a certificate.
1076 @end table
1077
1078 @noindent
1079 Additional parameters used to create a certificate (in contrast to a
1080 certificate signing request):
1081
1082 @table @asis
1083
1084 @item Serial: @var{sn}
1085 If this parameter is given an X.509 certificate will be generated.
1086 @var{sn} is expected to be a hex string representing an unsigned
1087 integer of arbitary length.  The special value @samp{random} can be
1088 used to create a 64 bit random serial number.
1089
1090 @item Issuer-DN: @var{issuer-name}
1091 This is the DN name of the issuer in rfc2253 format.  If it is not set
1092 it will default to the subject DN and a special GnuPG extension will
1093 be included in the certificate to mark it as a standalone certificate.
1094
1095 @item Creation-Date: @var{iso-date}
1096 @itemx Not-Before: @var{iso-date}
1097 Set the notBefore date of the certificate.  Either a date like
1098 @samp{1986-04-26} or @samp{1986-04-26 12:00} or a standard ISO
1099 timestamp like @samp{19860426T042640} may be used.  The time is
1100 considered to be UTC.  If it is not given the current date is used.
1101
1102 @item Expire-Date: @var{iso-date}
1103 @itemx Not-After: @var{iso-date}
1104 Set the notAfter date of the certificate.  Either a date like
1105 @samp{2063-04-05} or @samp{2063-04-05 17:00} or a standard ISO
1106 timestamp like @samp{20630405T170000} may be used.  The time is
1107 considered to be UTC.  If it is not given a default value in the not
1108 too far future is used.
1109
1110 @item Signing-Key: @var{keygrip}
1111 This gives the keygrip of the key used to sign the certificate.  If it
1112 is not given a self-signed certificate will be created.  For
1113 compatibility with future versions, it is suggested to prefix the
1114 keygrip with a @samp{&}.
1115
1116 @item Hash-Algo: @var{hash-algo}
1117 Use @var{hash-algo} for this CSR or certificate.  The supported hash
1118 algorithms are: @samp{sha1}, @samp{sha256}, @samp{sha384} and
1119 @samp{sha512}; they may also be specified with uppercase letters.  The
1120 default is @samp{sha256}.
1121
1122 @end table
1123
1124 @c *******************************************
1125 @c ***************           *****************
1126 @c ***************  ASSSUAN  *****************
1127 @c ***************           *****************
1128 @c *******************************************
1129 @node GPGSM Protocol
1130 @section The Protocol the Server Mode Uses.
1131
1132 Description of the protocol used to access @command{GPGSM}.
1133 @command{GPGSM} does implement the Assuan protocol and in addition
1134 provides a regular command line interface which exhibits a full client
1135 to this protocol (but uses internal linking).  To start
1136 @command{gpgsm} as a server the command line the option
1137 @code{--server} must be used.  Additional options are provided to
1138 select the communication method (i.e. the name of the socket).
1139
1140 We assume that the connection has already been established; see the
1141 Assuan manual for details.
1142
1143 @menu
1144 * GPGSM ENCRYPT::         Encrypting a message.
1145 * GPGSM DECRYPT::         Decrypting a message.
1146 * GPGSM SIGN::            Signing a message.
1147 * GPGSM VERIFY::          Verifying a message.
1148 * GPGSM GENKEY::          Generating a key.
1149 * GPGSM LISTKEYS::        List available keys.
1150 * GPGSM EXPORT::          Export certificates.
1151 * GPGSM IMPORT::          Import certificates.
1152 * GPGSM DELETE::          Delete certificates.
1153 * GPGSM GETINFO::         Information about the process
1154 @end menu
1155
1156
1157 @node GPGSM ENCRYPT
1158 @subsection Encrypting a Message
1159
1160 Before encryption can be done the recipient must be set using the
1161 command:
1162
1163 @example
1164   RECIPIENT @var{userID}
1165 @end example
1166
1167 Set the recipient for the encryption.  @var{userID} should be the
1168 internal representation of the key; the server may accept any other way
1169 of specification.  If this is a valid and trusted recipient the server
1170 does respond with OK, otherwise the return is an ERR with the reason why
1171 the recipient cannot be used, the encryption will then not be done for
1172 this recipient.  If the policy is not to encrypt at all if not all
1173 recipients are valid, the client has to take care of this.  All
1174 @code{RECIPIENT} commands are cumulative until a @code{RESET} or an
1175 successful @code{ENCRYPT} command.
1176
1177 @example
1178   INPUT FD[=@var{n}] [--armor|--base64|--binary]
1179 @end example
1180
1181 Set the file descriptor for the message to be encrypted to @var{n}.
1182 Obviously the pipe must be open at that point, the server establishes
1183 its own end.  If the server returns an error the client should consider
1184 this session failed.  If @var{n} is not given, this commands uses the
1185 last file descriptor passed to the application.
1186 @xref{fun-assuan_sendfd, ,the assuan_sendfd function,assuan,the Libassuan
1187 manual}, on how to do descriptor passing.
1188
1189 The @code{--armor} option may be used to advice the server that the
1190 input data is in @acronym{PEM} format, @code{--base64} advices that a
1191 raw base-64 encoding is used, @code{--binary} advices of raw binary
1192 input (@acronym{BER}).  If none of these options is used, the server
1193 tries to figure out the used encoding, but this may not always be
1194 correct.
1195
1196 @example
1197   OUTPUT FD[=@var{n}] [--armor|--base64]
1198 @end example
1199
1200 Set the file descriptor to be used for the output (i.e. the encrypted
1201 message). Obviously the pipe must be open at that point, the server
1202 establishes its own end.  If the server returns an error he client
1203 should consider this session failed.
1204
1205 The option armor encodes the output in @acronym{PEM} format, the
1206 @code{--base64} option applies just a base 64 encoding.  No option
1207 creates binary output (@acronym{BER}).
1208
1209 The actual encryption is done using the command
1210
1211 @example
1212   ENCRYPT
1213 @end example
1214
1215 It takes the plaintext from the @code{INPUT} command, writes to the
1216 ciphertext to the file descriptor set with the @code{OUTPUT} command,
1217 take the recipients from all the recipients set so far.  If this command
1218 fails the clients should try to delete all output currently done or
1219 otherwise mark it as invalid.  @command{GPGSM} does ensure that there
1220 will not be any
1221 security problem with leftover data on the output in this case.
1222
1223 This command should in general not fail, as all necessary checks have
1224 been done while setting the recipients.  The input and output pipes are
1225 closed.
1226
1227
1228 @node GPGSM DECRYPT
1229 @subsection Decrypting a message
1230
1231 Input and output FDs are set the same way as in encryption, but
1232 @code{INPUT} refers to the ciphertext and output to the plaintext. There
1233 is no need to set recipients.  @command{GPGSM} automatically strips any
1234 @acronym{S/MIME} headers from the input, so it is valid to pass an
1235 entire MIME part to the INPUT pipe.
1236
1237 The encryption is done by using the command
1238
1239 @example
1240   DECRYPT
1241 @end example
1242
1243 It performs the decrypt operation after doing some check on the internal
1244 state. (e.g. that all needed data has been set).  Because it utilizes
1245 the GPG-Agent for the session key decryption, there is no need to ask
1246 the client for a protecting passphrase - GpgAgent takes care of this by
1247 requesting this from the user.
1248
1249
1250 @node GPGSM SIGN
1251 @subsection Signing a Message
1252
1253 Signing is usually done with these commands:
1254
1255 @example
1256   INPUT FD[=@var{n}] [--armor|--base64|--binary]
1257 @end example
1258
1259 This tells @command{GPGSM} to read the data to sign from file descriptor @var{n}.
1260
1261 @example
1262   OUTPUT FD[=@var{m}] [--armor|--base64]
1263 @end example
1264
1265 Write the output to file descriptor @var{m}.  If a detached signature is
1266 requested, only the signature is written.
1267
1268 @example
1269   SIGN [--detached]
1270 @end example
1271
1272 Sign the data set with the INPUT command and write it to the sink set by
1273 OUTPUT.  With @code{--detached}, a detached signature is created
1274 (surprise).
1275
1276 The key used for signing is the default one or the one specified in
1277 the configuration file.  To get finer control over the keys, it is
1278 possible to use the command
1279
1280 @example
1281   SIGNER @var{userID}
1282 @end example
1283
1284 to the signer's key.  @var{userID} should be the
1285 internal representation of the key; the server may accept any other way
1286 of specification.  If this is a valid and trusted recipient the server
1287 does respond with OK, otherwise the return is an ERR with the reason why
1288 the key cannot be used, the signature will then not be created using
1289 this key.  If the policy is not to sign at all if not all
1290 keys are valid, the client has to take care of this.  All
1291 @code{SIGNER} commands are cumulative until a @code{RESET} is done.
1292 Note that a @code{SIGN} does not reset this list of signers which is in
1293 contrats to the @code{RECIPIENT} command.
1294
1295
1296 @node GPGSM VERIFY
1297 @subsection Verifying a Message
1298
1299 To verify a mesage the command:
1300
1301 @example
1302   VERIFY
1303 @end example
1304
1305 is used. It does a verify operation on the message send to the input FD.
1306 The result is written out using status lines.  If an output FD was
1307 given, the signed text will be written to that.  If the signature is a
1308 detached one, the server will inquire about the signed material and the
1309 client must provide it.
1310
1311 @node GPGSM GENKEY
1312 @subsection Generating a Key
1313
1314 This is used to generate a new keypair, store the secret part in the
1315 @acronym{PSE} and the public key in the key database.  We will probably
1316 add optional commands to allow the client to select whether a hardware
1317 token is used to store the key.  Configuration options to
1318 @command{GPGSM} can be used to restrict the use of this command.
1319
1320 @example
1321   GENKEY
1322 @end example
1323
1324 @command{GPGSM} checks whether this command is allowed and then does an
1325 INQUIRY to get the key parameters, the client should then send the
1326 key parameters in the native format:
1327
1328 @example
1329     S: INQUIRE KEY_PARAM native
1330     C: D foo:fgfgfg
1331     C: D bar
1332     C: END
1333 @end example
1334
1335 Please note that the server may send Status info lines while reading the
1336 data lines from the client.  After this the key generation takes place
1337 and the server eventually does send an ERR or OK response.  Status lines
1338 may be issued as a progress indicator.
1339
1340
1341 @node GPGSM LISTKEYS
1342 @subsection List available keys
1343
1344 To list the keys in the internal database or using an external key
1345 provider, the command:
1346
1347 @example
1348   LISTKEYS  @var{pattern}
1349 @end example
1350
1351 is used.  To allow multiple patterns (which are ORed during the search)
1352 quoting is required: Spaces are to be translated into "+" or into "%20";
1353 in turn this requires that the usual escape quoting rules are done.
1354
1355 @example
1356   LISTSECRETKEYS @var{pattern}
1357 @end example
1358
1359 Lists only the keys where a secret key is available.
1360
1361 The list commands  commands are affected by the option
1362
1363 @example
1364   OPTION list-mode=@var{mode}
1365 @end example
1366
1367 where mode may be:
1368 @table @code
1369 @item 0
1370 Use default (which is usually the same as 1).
1371 @item 1
1372 List only the internal keys.
1373 @item 2
1374 List only the external keys.
1375 @item 3
1376 List internal and external keys.
1377 @end table
1378
1379 Note that options are valid for the entire session.
1380
1381
1382 @node GPGSM EXPORT
1383 @subsection Export certificates
1384
1385 To export certificate from the internal key database the command:
1386
1387 @example
1388   EXPORT [--data [--armor] [--base64]] [--] @var{pattern}
1389 @end example
1390
1391 is used.  To allow multiple patterns (which are ORed) quoting is
1392 required: Spaces are to be translated into "+" or into "%20"; in turn
1393 this requires that the usual escape quoting rules are done.
1394
1395 If the @option{--data} option has not been given, the format of the
1396 output depends on what was set with the OUTPUT command.  When using
1397 @acronym{PEM} encoding a few informational lines are prepended.
1398
1399 If the @option{--data} has been given, a target set via OUTPUT is
1400 ignored and the data is returned inline using standard
1401 @code{D}-lines. This avoids the need for an extra file descriptor.  In
1402 this case the options @option{--armor} and @option{--base64} may be used
1403 in the same way as with the OUTPUT command.
1404
1405
1406 @node GPGSM IMPORT
1407 @subsection Import certificates
1408
1409 To import certificates into the internal key database, the command
1410
1411 @example
1412   IMPORT [--re-import]
1413 @end example
1414
1415 is used.  The data is expected on the file descriptor set with the
1416 @code{INPUT} command.  Certain checks are performed on the
1417 certificate.  Note that the code will also handle PKCS#12 files and
1418 import private keys; a helper program is used for that.
1419
1420 With the option @option{--re-import} the input data is expected to a be
1421 a linefeed separated list of fingerprints.  The command will re-import
1422 the corresponding certificates; that is they are made permanent by
1423 removing their ephemeral flag.
1424
1425
1426 @node GPGSM DELETE
1427 @subsection Delete certificates
1428
1429 To delete a certificate the command
1430
1431 @example
1432   DELKEYS @var{pattern}
1433 @end example
1434
1435 is used.  To allow multiple patterns (which are ORed) quoting is
1436 required: Spaces are to be translated into "+" or into "%20"; in turn
1437 this requires that the usual escape quoting rules are done.
1438
1439 The certificates must be specified unambiguously otherwise an error is
1440 returned.
1441
1442 @node GPGSM GETINFO
1443 @subsection  Return information about the process
1444
1445 This is a multipurpose function to return a variety of information.
1446
1447 @example
1448 GETINFO @var{what}
1449 @end example
1450
1451 The value of @var{what} specifies the kind of information returned:
1452 @table @code
1453 @item version
1454 Return the version of the program.
1455 @item pid
1456 Return the process id of the process.
1457 @item agent-check
1458 Return success if the agent is running.
1459 @item cmd_has_option @var{cmd} @var{opt}
1460 Return success if the command @var{cmd} implements the option @var{opt}.
1461 The leading two dashes usually used with @var{opt} shall not be given.
1462 @end table
1463
1464 @mansect see also
1465 @ifset isman
1466 @command{gpg2}(1),
1467 @command{gpg-agent}(1)
1468 @end ifset
1469 @include see-also-note.texi