gpg: Allow import of PGP desktop exported secret keys.
[gnupg.git] / doc / specify-user-id.texi
index d973379..64e354b 100644 (file)
@@ -99,9 +99,9 @@ This uses a substring search but considers only the mail address
 @item By exact match on the subject's DN.
 This is indicated by a leading slash, directly followed by the RFC-2253
 encoded DN of the subject.  Note that you can't use the string printed
-by "gpgsm --list-keys" because that one has been reordered and modified
-for better readability; use --with-colons to print the raw (but standard
-escaped) RFC-2253 string
+by @code{gpgsm --list-keys} because that one has been reordered and modified
+for better readability; use @option{--with-colons} to print the raw
+(but standard escaped) RFC-2253 string.
 
 @cartouche
 @example
@@ -111,7 +111,7 @@ escaped) RFC-2253 string
 
 @item By exact match on the issuer's DN.
 This is indicated by a leading hash mark, directly followed by a slash
-and then directly followed by the rfc2253 encoded DN of the issuer.
+and then directly followed by the RFC-2253 encoded DN of the issuer.
 This should return the Root cert of the issuer.  See note above.
 
 @cartouche
@@ -132,10 +132,10 @@ RFC-2253 encoded DN of the issuer. See note above.
 @end example
 @end cartouche
 
-@item By keygrip
+@item By keygrip.
 This is indicated by an ampersand followed by the 40 hex digits of a
 keygrip.  @command{gpgsm} prints the keygrip when using the command
-@option{--dump-cert}.  It does not yet work for OpenPGP keys.
+@option{--dump-cert}.
 
 @cartouche
 @example
@@ -171,6 +171,3 @@ Using the RFC-2253 format of DNs has the drawback that it is not
 possible to map them back to the original encoding, however we don't
 have to do this because our key database stores this encoding as meta
 data.
-
-
-