gpg: New option --known-notation.
[gnupg.git] / doc / specify-user-id.texi
index 0929a10..b363c2a 100644 (file)
@@ -6,7 +6,7 @@ are only valid for @command{gpg} others are only good for
 
 @itemize @bullet
 
-@item By key Id. 
+@item By key Id.
 This format is deduced from the length of the string and its content or
 @code{0x} prefix. The key Id of an X.509 certificate are the low 64 bits
 of its SHA-1 fingerprint.  The use of key Ids is just a shortcut, for
@@ -59,16 +59,17 @@ avoids any ambiguities in case that there are duplicated key IDs.
 @end cartouche
 
 @noindent
-(@command{gpgsm} also accepts colons between each pair of hexadecimal
+@command{gpgsm} also accepts colons between each pair of hexadecimal
 digits because this is the de-facto standard on how to present X.509
-fingerprints.)
+fingerprints.  @command{gpg} also allows the use of the space
+separated SHA-1 fingerprint as printed by the key listing commands.
 
 @item By exact match on OpenPGP user ID.
 This is denoted by a leading equal sign. It does not make sense for
 X.509 certificates.
 
 @cartouche
-@example 
+@example
 =Heinrich Heine <heinrichh@@uni-duesseldorf.de>
 @end example
 @end cartouche
@@ -84,23 +85,23 @@ with left and right angles.
 @end cartouche
 
 
-@item By word match.
-All words must match exactly (not case sensitive) but can appear in any
-order in the user ID or a subjects name.  Words are any sequences of
-letters, digits, the underscore and all characters with bit 7 set.
+@item By partial match on an email address.
+This is indicated by prefixing the search string with an @code{@@}.
+This uses a substring search but considers only the mail address
+(i.e. inside the angle brackets).
 
 @cartouche
 @example
-+Heinrich Heine duesseldorf
+@@heinrichh
 @end example
 @end cartouche
 
 @item By exact match on the subject's DN.
 This is indicated by a leading slash, directly followed by the RFC-2253
 encoded DN of the subject.  Note that you can't use the string printed
-by "gpgsm --list-keys" because that one as been reordered and modified
-for better readability; use --with-colons to print the raw (but standard
-escaped) RFC-2253 string
+by @code{gpgsm --list-keys} because that one has been reordered and modified
+for better readability; use @option{--with-colons} to print the raw
+(but standard escaped) RFC-2253 string.
 
 @cartouche
 @example
@@ -110,7 +111,7 @@ escaped) RFC-2253 string
 
 @item By exact match on the issuer's DN.
 This is indicated by a leading hash mark, directly followed by a slash
-and then directly followed by the rfc2253 encoded DN of the issuer.
+and then directly followed by the RFC-2253 encoded DN of the issuer.
 This should return the Root cert of the issuer.  See note above.
 
 @cartouche
@@ -121,7 +122,7 @@ This should return the Root cert of the issuer.  See note above.
 
 
 @item By exact match on serial number and issuer's DN.
-This is indicated by a hash mark, followed by the hexadecmal
+This is indicated by a hash mark, followed by the hexadecimal
 representation of the serial number, then followed by a slash and the
 RFC-2253 encoded DN of the issuer. See note above.
 
@@ -131,7 +132,7 @@ RFC-2253 encoded DN of the issuer. See note above.
 @end example
 @end cartouche
 
-@item By keygrip
+@item By keygrip.
 This is indicated by an ampersand followed by the 40 hex digits of a
 keygrip.  @command{gpgsm} prints the keygrip when using the command
 @option{--dump-cert}.  It does not yet work for OpenPGP keys.
@@ -155,8 +156,12 @@ Heine
 @end example
 @end cartouche
 
-@end itemize
+@item . and + prefixes
+These prefixes are reserved for looking up mails anchored at the end
+and for a word search mode.  They are not yet implemented and using
+them is undefined.
 
+@end itemize
 
 Please note that we have reused the hash mark identifier which was used
 in old GnuPG versions to indicate the so called local-id.  It is not