Merge branch 'master' into javascript-binding
[gpgme.git] / src / cJSON.readme
1 /*
2   Copyright (c) 2009 Dave Gamble
3
4   Permission is hereby granted, free of charge, to any person obtaining a copy
5   of this software and associated documentation files (the "Software"), to deal
6   in the Software without restriction, including without limitation the rights
7   to use, copy, modify, merge, publish, distribute, sublicense, and/or sell
8   copies of the Software, and to permit persons to whom the Software is
9   furnished to do so, subject to the following conditions:
10
11   The above copyright notice and this permission notice shall be included in
12   all copies or substantial portions of the Software.
13
14   THE SOFTWARE IS PROVIDED "AS IS", WITHOUT WARRANTY OF ANY KIND, EXPRESS OR
15   IMPLIED, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO THE WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY,
16   FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE AND NONINFRINGEMENT. IN NO EVENT SHALL THE
17   AUTHORS OR COPYRIGHT HOLDERS BE LIABLE FOR ANY CLAIM, DAMAGES OR OTHER
18   LIABILITY, WHETHER IN AN ACTION OF CONTRACT, TORT OR OTHERWISE, ARISING FROM,
19   OUT OF OR IN CONNECTION WITH THE SOFTWARE OR THE USE OR OTHER DEALINGS IN
20   THE SOFTWARE.
21 */
22
23 Welcome to cJSON.
24
25 cJSON aims to be the dumbest possible parser that you can get your job
26 done with.  It's a single file of C, and a single header file.
27
28 JSON is described best here: http://www.json.org/ It's like XML, but
29 fat-free. You use it to move data around, store things, or just
30 generally represent your program's state.
31
32
33 First up, how do I build?  Add cJSON.c to your project, and put
34 cJSON.h somewhere in the header search path.  For example, to build
35 the test app:
36
37 gcc cJSON.c test.c -o test -lm
38 ./test
39
40
41 As a library, cJSON exists to take away as much legwork as it can, but
42 not get in your way.  As a point of pragmatism (i.e. ignoring the
43 truth), I'm going to say that you can use it in one of two modes: Auto
44 and Manual. Let's have a quick run-through.
45
46
47 I lifted some JSON from this page: http://www.json.org/fatfree.html
48 That page inspired me to write cJSON, which is a parser that tries to
49 share the same philosophy as JSON itself. Simple, dumb, out of the
50 way.
51
52 Some JSON:
53 {
54     "name": "Jack (\"Bee\") Nimble",
55     "format": {
56         "type":       "rect",
57         "width":      1920,
58         "height":     1080,
59         "interlace":  false,
60         "frame rate": 24
61     }
62 }
63
64 Assume that you got this from a file, a webserver, or magic JSON
65 elves, whatever, you have a char * to it. Everything is a cJSON
66 struct.  Get it parsed:
67
68          cJSON *root = cJSON_Parse(my_json_string);
69
70 This is an object. We're in C. We don't have objects. But we do have
71 structs.  What's the framerate?
72
73         cJSON *format = cJSON_GetObjectItem(root,"format");
74         int framerate = cJSON_GetObjectItem(format,"frame rate")->valueint;
75
76 Want to change the framerate?
77
78         cJSON_GetObjectItem(format,"frame rate")->valueint=25;
79
80 Back to disk?
81
82         char *rendered=cJSON_Print(root);
83
84 Finished? Delete the root (this takes care of everything else).
85
86         cJSON_Delete(root);
87
88 That's AUTO mode. If you're going to use Auto mode, you really ought
89 to check pointers before you dereference them. If you want to see how
90 you'd build this struct in code?
91
92         cJSON *root,*fmt;
93         root=cJSON_CreateObject();
94         cJSON_AddItemToObject(root, "name",
95                               cJSON_CreateString("Jack (\"Bee\") Nimble"));
96         cJSON_AddItemToObject(root, "format", fmt=cJSON_CreateObject());
97         cJSON_AddStringToObject(fmt,"type",             "rect");
98         cJSON_AddNumberToObject(fmt,"width",            1920);
99         cJSON_AddNumberToObject(fmt,"height",           1080);
100         cJSON_AddFalseToObject (fmt,"interlace");
101         cJSON_AddNumberToObject(fmt,"frame rate",       24);
102
103 Hopefully we can agree that's not a lot of code? There's no overhead,
104 no unnecessary setup.  Look at test.c for a bunch of nice examples,
105 mostly all ripped off the json.org site, and a few from elsewhere.
106
107 What about manual mode? First up you need some detail.  Let's cover
108 how the cJSON objects represent the JSON data.  cJSON doesn't
109 distinguish arrays from objects in handling; just type.  Each cJSON
110 has, potentially, a child, siblings, value, a name.
111
112 - The root object has: Object Type and a Child
113 - The Child has name "name", with value "Jack ("Bee") Nimble", and a sibling:
114 - Sibling has type Object, name "format", and a child.
115 - That child has type String, name "type", value "rect", and a sibling:
116 - Sibling has type Number, name "width", value 1920, and a sibling:
117 - Sibling has type Number, name "height", value 1080, and a sibling:
118 - Sibling hs type False, name "interlace", and a sibling:
119 - Sibling has type Number, name "frame rate", value 24
120
121 Here's the structure:
122
123 typedef struct cJSON {
124         struct cJSON *next,*prev;
125         struct cJSON *child;
126
127         int type;
128
129         char *valuestring;
130         int valueint;
131         double valuedouble;
132
133         char *string;
134 } cJSON;
135
136 By default all values are 0 unless set by virtue of being meaningful.
137
138 next/prev is a doubly linked list of siblings. next takes you to your sibling,
139 prev takes you back from your sibling to you.
140
141 Only objects and arrays have a "child", and it's the head of the
142 doubly linked list.
143
144 A "child" entry will have prev==0, but next potentially points on. The
145 last sibling has next=0.
146
147 The type expresses Null/True/False/Number/String/Array/Object, all of
148 which are #defined in cJSON.h
149
150 A Number has valueint and valuedouble. If you're expecting an int,
151 read valueint, if not read valuedouble.
152
153 Any entry which is in the linked list which is the child of an object
154 will have a "string" which is the "name" of the entry. When I said
155 "name" in the above example, that's "string".  "string" is the JSON
156 name for the 'variable name' if you will.
157
158 Now you can trivially walk the lists, recursively, and parse as you
159 please.  You can invoke cJSON_Parse to get cJSON to parse for you, and
160 then you can take the root object, and traverse the structure (which
161 is, formally, an N-tree), and tokenise as you please. If you wanted to
162 build a callback style parser, this is how you'd do it (just an
163 example, since these things are very specific):
164
165 void parse_and_callback(cJSON *item,const char *prefix)
166 {
167         while (item)
168         {
169                 char *newprefix=malloc(strlen(prefix)+strlen(item->name)+2);
170                 sprintf(newprefix,"%s/%s",prefix,item->name);
171                 int dorecurse=callback(newprefix, item->type, item);
172                 if (item->child && dorecurse)
173                     parse_and_callback(item->child,newprefix);
174                 item=item->next;
175                 free(newprefix);
176         }
177 }
178
179 The prefix process will build you a separated list, to simplify your
180 callback handling.
181
182 The 'dorecurse' flag would let the callback decide to handle
183 sub-arrays on it's own, or let you invoke it per-item. For the item
184 above, your callback might look like this:
185
186 int callback(const char *name,int type,cJSON *item)
187 {
188         if (!strcmp(name,"name"))       { /* populate name */ }
189         else if (!strcmp(name,"format/type")    { /* handle "rect" */ }
190         else if (!strcmp(name,"format/width")   { /* 800 */ }
191         else if (!strcmp(name,"format/height")  { /* 600 */ }
192         else if (!strcmp(name,"format/interlace")       { /* false */ }
193         else if (!strcmp(name,"format/frame rate")      { /* 24 */ }
194         return 1;
195 }
196
197 Alternatively, you might like to parse iteratively.
198 You'd use:
199
200 void parse_object(cJSON *item)
201 {
202         int i; for (i=0;i<cJSON_GetArraySize(item);i++)
203         {
204                 cJSON *subitem=cJSON_GetArrayItem(item,i);
205                 // handle subitem.
206         }
207 }
208
209 Or, for PROPER manual mode:
210
211 void parse_object(cJSON *item)
212 {
213         cJSON *subitem=item->child;
214         while (subitem)
215         {
216                 // handle subitem
217                 if (subitem->child) parse_object(subitem->child);
218
219                 subitem=subitem->next;
220         }
221 }
222
223 Of course, this should look familiar, since this is just a
224 stripped-down version of the callback-parser.
225
226 This should cover most uses you'll find for parsing. The rest should
227 be possible to infer.. and if in doubt, read the source! There's not a
228 lot of it! ;)
229
230
231 In terms of constructing JSON data, the example code above is the
232 right way to do it.  You can, of course, hand your sub-objects to
233 other functions to populate.  Also, if you find a use for it, you can
234 manually build the objects.  For instance, suppose you wanted to build
235 an array of objects?
236
237 cJSON *objects[24];
238
239 cJSON *Create_array_of_anything(cJSON **items,int num)
240 {
241         int i;cJSON *prev, *root=cJSON_CreateArray();
242         for (i=0;i<24;i++)
243         {
244                 if (!i) root->child=objects[i];
245                 else    prev->next=objects[i], objects[i]->prev=prev;
246                 prev=objects[i];
247         }
248         return root;
249 }
250
251 and simply: Create_array_of_anything(objects,24);
252
253 cJSON doesn't make any assumptions about what order you create things
254 in.  You can attach the objects, as above, and later add children to
255 each of those objects.
256
257 As soon as you call cJSON_Print, it renders the structure to text.
258
259
260
261 The test.c code shows how to handle a bunch of typical cases. If you
262 uncomment the code, it'll load, parse and print a bunch of test files,
263 also from json.org, which are more complex than I'd care to try and
264 stash into a const char array[].
265
266
267 Enjoy cJSON!
268
269
270 - Dave Gamble, Aug 2009