See ChangeLog: Sat Jan 9 16:02:23 CET 1999 Werner Koch
[gnupg.git] / THOUGHTS
1
2         /* we still have these if a signed signed more than one
3          * user ID.  I don't think that is makes sense to sign
4          * more than one user ID; an exception might be a user ID
5          * which is to be removed in near future.  Anyway it is
6          * always good to sign only those user ID which are
7          * unlikely to change.  It might be good to insert a
8          * user ID which does not contain an email address and
9          * mark this one with a special signature flag or let
10          * sign_key() suggest a user ID w/o an email address
11          */
12
13
14     * What shall we do if we have a valid subkey revocation certificate
15       but no subkey binding?  Is this a valid but revoked key?
16
17
18 Date: Mon, 4 Jan 1999 19:34:29 -0800 (PST)
19 From: Matthew Skala <mskala@ansuz.sooke.bc.ca>
20
21 - Signing with an expired key doesn't work by default, does work with a
22   special option.
23 - Verifying a signature that appears to have been made by an expired key
24   after its expiry date but is otherwise good reports the signature as BAD,
25   preferably with a message indicating that it's a key-expiry problem rather
26   than a cryptographically bad signature.
27 - Verifying a signature from a key that is now expired, where the
28   signature was made before the expiry date, reports the signature as
29   GOOD, possibly with a warning that the key has since expired.
30 - Encrypting to an expired key doesn't work by default, does work with a
31   special option.
32 - Decrypting always works, if you have the appropriate secret key and
33   passphrase.
34
35
36
37 -----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----
38 Hash: SHA1
39
40 Hi Werner..
41
42 I was looking at some of the PROJECTS items in the recent gpg CVS and wanted
43 to comment on one of them:
44
45   * Add a way to override the current cipher/md implementations
46     by others (using extensions)
47
48 As you know I've been thinking about how to use a PalmPilot or an iButton in
49 some useful way in GPG. The two things that seem reasonable are:
50  1) keep the secret key in the device, only transferring it to the host
51     computer for the duration of the secret-key operation (sign or decrypt).
52     The key is never kept on disk, only in RAM. This removes the chance that
53     casual snooping on your office workstation will reveal your key (it
54     doesn't help against an active attack, but the attacker must leave a
55     tampered version of GPG around or otherwise get their code to run while
56     the key-storage device is attached to attack the key)
57  2) perform the secret-key operation on the device, so the secret key never
58     leaves the confines of that device. There are still attacks possible,
59     based upon talking to the device while it is connected and trying to
60     convince the device (and possibly the user) that it is the real GPG,
61     but in general this protects the key pretty strongly. Any individual
62     message is still vulnerable, but that's a tradeoff of the convenience of
63     composing that message on a full-sized screen+keyboard (plus the added
64     speed of encryption) vs. the security of writing the message on a
65     secure device.
66
67 I think there are a variety of ways of implementing these things, but a few
68 extension mechanisms in GPG should be enough to try various ways later on.
69
70 1) pass an argument string to loadable extension modules (maybe
71     gpg --load-extension foofish=arg1,arg2,arg3 ?)
72 2) allow multiple instances of the same extension module (presumably with
73    different arguments)
74 3) allow extension modules to use stdin/stdout/stderr as normal (probably
75    already in there), for giving feedback to the user, or possibly asking them
76    for a password of some sort
77 4) have an extension to provide secret keys:
78
79    It looks like most of the hooks for this are already in place, it just
80    needs an extension module which can register itself as a keyblock resource.
81
82    I'm thinking of a module for this that is given an external program name as
83    an argument. When the keyblock resource is asked to enumerate its keys, it
84    runs the external program (first with a "0" argument, then a "1", and so on
85    until the program reports that no more keys are available). The external
86    program returns one (possibly armored) secret key block each time. The
87    program might have some kind of special protocol to talk to the storage
88    device.  One thing that comes to mind is to simply include a random number
89    in the message sent over the serial port: the program would display this
90    number, the Pilot at the other end would display the number it receives, if
91    the user sees that both are the same they instruct the Pilot to release the
92    key, as basic protection against someone else asking for the key while it
93    is attached. More sophisticated schemes are possible depending upon how
94    much processing power and IO is available on the device. But the same
95    extension module should be able to handle as complex a scheme as one could
96    wish.
97
98    The current keyblock-resource interface would work fine, although it
99    might be more convenient if a resource could be asked for a key by id
100    instead of enumerating all of them and then searching through the resulting
101    list for a match. A module that provided public keys would have to work this
102    way (imagine a module that could automatically do an http fetch for a
103    particular key.. easily-added automatic key fetching). Without that ability
104    to fetch by id (which would require it to fall back to the other keyblock
105    resources if it failed), the user's device might be asked to release the
106    key even though some other secret key was the one needed.
107
108
109 5) have an extension to perform a secret-key operation without the actual
110    secret key material
111
112  basically something to indicate that any decrypt or sign operations that
113  occur for a specific keyid should call the extension module instead. The
114  secret key would not be extracted (it wouldn't be available anyway). The
115  module is given the keyid and the MPI of the block it is supposed to sign
116  or decrypt.
117
118  The module could then run an external program to do the operation. I'm
119  imagining a Pilot program which receives the data, asks the user if it can go
120  along with the operation (after displaying a hash of the request, which is
121  also displayed by the extension module's program to make sure the Pilot is
122  being asked to do the right operation), performs the signature or decryption,
123  then returns the data. This protocol could be made arbitrarily complex, with
124  a D-H key to encrypt the link, and both sides signing requests to
125  authenticate one to the other (although this transforms the the problem of
126  getting your secret key off your office workstation into the problem of
127  your workstation holding a key tells your Pilot that it is allowed to perform
128  the secret key operation, and if someone gets a hold of that key they may
129  be able to trick your pilot [plugged in somewhere else] to do the same thing
130  for them).
131
132  This is basically red/black separation, with the Pilot or iButton having the
133  perimeter beyond which the red data doesn't pass. Better than the secret-key
134  storage device but requires a lot more power on the device (the new iButtons
135  with the exponentiator could do it, but it would take way too much code space
136  on the old ones, although they would be fine for just carrying the keys).
137
138 The signature code might need to be extended to verify the signature you just
139 made, since an active intruder pretending to the the Pilot wouldn't be able to
140 make a valid signature (but they might sign your message with a different key
141 just to be annoying).
142
143 Anyway, just wanted to share my thoughts on some possibilities. I've been
144 carrying this little Java iButton on my keyring for months now, looking for
145 something cool to do with it, and I think that secure storage for my GPG key
146 would be just the right application.
147
148 cheers,
149  -Brian
150
151 -----BEGIN PGP SIGNATURE-----
152 Version: GnuPG v0.4.5 (GNU/Linux)
153 Comment: For info finger gcrypt@ftp.guug.de
154
155 iD8DBQE2c5oZkDmgv9E5zEwRArAwAKDWV5fpTtbGPiMPgl2Bpp0gvhbfQgCgzJuY
156 AmIQTk4s62/y2zMAHDdOzK0=
157 =jr7m
158 -----END PGP SIGNATURE-----
159
160
161
162 About a new Keyserver  (discussion with Allan Clark <allanc@sco.com>):
163 =====================
164
165 Some ideas:
166
167 o  the KS should verify signatures and only accept those
168    which are good.
169
170 o  Keep a blacklist of known bad signatures to minimize
171    the time needed to check them
172
173 o  Should be fast - I currently designing a new storage
174    system called keybox which takes advantage of the fact
175    that the keyID is higly random and can be directly be
176    used as a hash value and this keyID is (for v4 keys)
177    part of the fingerprint: So it is possible to use the
178    fingerprint as key but do an lookup by the keyID.
179
180 o  To be used as the "public keyring" in a LAN so that there
181    is no need to keep one on every machine.
182
183 o  Allow more that one file for key storage.
184
185 o  Use the HKS protocol and enhance it in a way that binary
186    keyrings can be transmitted.  (I already wrote some
187    http server and client code which can be used for this)
188
189 o  Keep a checkcsum (hash) of the entire keyblock so that a
190    client can easy check whether this keyblock has changed.
191    (keyblock = the entire key with all certificates etc.)
192
193 o  Allow efficient propagation of new keys and revocation
194    certificates.
195
196
197 Probably more things but this keyserver is not a goal for the
198 1.0 release. Someone should be able to fix some of the limitations
199 of the existing key servers (I think they bail out on some rfc2440
200 packet formats).
201