See ChangeLog: Sun Jan 24 18:16:26 CET 1999 Werner Koch
[gnupg.git] / doc / DETAILS
1
2 Format of "---with-colons" listings
3 ===================================
4
5 sec::1024:17:6C7EE1B8621CC013:1998-07-07:0:::Werner Koch <werner.koch@guug.de>:
6 ssb::1536:20:5CE086B5B5A18FF4:1998-07-07:0:::
7
8  1. Field:  Type of record
9             pub = public key
10             sub = subkey (secondary key)
11             sec = secret key
12             ssb = secret subkey (secondary key)
13             uid = user id (only field 10 is used).
14             fpr = fingerprint: (fingerprint is in field 10)
15
16  2. Field:  A letter describing the calculated trust, see doc/FAQ
17             This is a single letter, but be prepared that additional
18             information may follow in some future versions.
19             (not used for secret keys)
20  3. Field:  length of key in bits.
21  4. Field:  Algorithm:  1 = RSA
22                        16 = ElGamal (encrypt only)
23                        17 = DSA (sometimes called DH, sign only)
24                        20 = ElGamal (sign and encrypt)
25  5. Field:  KeyID
26  6. Field:  Creation Date (in UTC)
27  7. Field:  Key expiration date or empty if none.
28  8. Field:  Local ID: record number of the dir record in the trustdb
29             this value is only valid as long as the trustdb is not
30             deleted.  May be later used to lookup the key: You will be
31             able to use "#<local-id> as the user id.  This is needed
32             because keyids may not be unique - a program may use this
33             number to access keys later.
34  9. Field:  Ownertrust (primary public keys only)
35             This is a single letter, but be prepared that additional
36             information may follow in some future versions.
37 10. Field:  User-ID.  The value is quoted like a C string to avoid
38             control characters (the colon is quoted "\x3a").
39
40 More fields may be added later.
41
42
43 Format of the "--status-fd" output
44 ==================================
45 Every line is prefixed with "[GNUPG:] ", followed by a keyword with
46 the type of the status line and a some arguments depending on the
47 type (maybe none); an application should always be prepared to see
48 more arguments in future versions.
49
50
51     GOODSIG     <long keyid>  <username>
52         The signature with the keyid is good.
53
54     BADSIG      <long keyid>  <username>
55         The signature with the keyid has not been verified okay.
56
57     ERRSIG
58         It was not possible to check the signature.  This may be
59         caused by a missing public key or an unsupported algorithm.
60         No argument yet.
61
62     VALIDSIG    <fingerprint in hex>
63         The signature with the keyid is good. This is the same
64         as GOODSIG but has the fingerprint as the argument. Both
65         status lines ere emitted for a good signature.
66
67     TRUST_UNDEFINED
68     TRUST_NEVER
69     TRUST_MARGINAL
70     TRUST_FULLY
71     TRUST_ULTIMATE
72         For good signatures one of these status lines are emitted
73         to indicate how trustworthy the signature is.  No arguments yet.
74
75     SIGEXPIRED
76         The signature key has expired.  No arguments yet.
77
78     KEYREVOKED
79         The used key has been revoked by his owner.  No arguments yet.
80
81     BADARMOR
82         The ascii armor is corrupted.  No arguments yet.
83
84     RSA_OR_IDEA
85         The RSA or IDEA algorithms has been used in the data.  A
86         program might want to fallback to another program to handle
87         the data if GnuPG failed.
88
89     SHM_INFO
90     SHM_GET
91     SHM_GET_BOOL
92     SHM_GET_HIDDEN
93     NEED_PASSPHRASE
94         [Needs documentation]
95
96
97
98
99 Key generation
100 ==============
101     Key generation shows progress by printing different characters to
102     stderr:
103              "."  Last 10 Miller-Rabin tests failed
104              "+"  Miller-Rabin test succeeded
105              "!"  Reloading the pool with fresh prime numbers
106              "^"  Checking a new value for the generator
107              "<"  Size of one factor decreased
108              ">"  Size of one factor increased
109
110     The prime number for ElGamal is generated this way:
111
112     1) Make a prime number q of 160, 200, 240 bits (depending on the keysize)
113     2) Select the length of the other prime factors to be at least the size
114        of q and calculate the number of prime factors needed
115     3) Make a pool of prime numbers, each of the length determined in step 2
116     4) Get a new permutation out of the pool or continue with step 3
117        if we have tested all permutations.
118     5) Calculate a candidate prime p = 2 * q * p[1] * ... * p[n] + 1
119     6) Check that this prime has the correct length (this may change q if
120        it seems not to be possible to make a prime of the desired length)
121     7) Check whether this is a prime using trial divisions and the
122        Miller-Rabin test.
123     8) Continue with step 4 if we did not find a prime in step 7.
124     9) Find a generator for that prime.
125
126
127
128 Layout of the TrustDB
129 =====================
130 The TrustDB is built from fixed length records, where the first byte
131 describes the record type.  All numeric values are stored in network
132 byte order. The length of each record is 40 bytes. The first record of
133 the DB is always of type 2 and this is the only record of this type.
134
135 Record type 0:
136 --------------
137     Unused record, can be reused for any purpose.
138
139 Record type 1:
140 --------------
141     Version information for this TrustDB.  This is always the first
142     record of the DB and the only one with type 1.
143      1 byte value 1
144      3 bytes 'gpg'  magic value
145      1 byte Version of the TrustDB (2)
146      1 byte marginals needed
147      1 byte completes needed
148      1 byte max_cert_depth
149             The three items are used to check whether the cached
150             validity value from the dir record can be used.
151      1 u32  locked flags
152      1 u32  timestamp of trustdb creation
153      1 u32  timestamp of last modification
154      1 u32  timestamp of last validation
155             (Used to keep track of the time, when this TrustDB was checked
156              against the pubring)
157      1 u32  record number of keyhashtable
158      1 u32  first free record
159      1 u32  record number of shadow directory hash table
160             It does not make sense to combine this table with the key table
161             because the keyid is not in every case a part of the fingerprint.
162      4 bytes reserved for version extension record
163
164
165 Record type 2: (directory record)
166 --------------
167     Informations about a public key certificate.
168     These are static values which are never changed without user interaction.
169
170      1 byte value 2
171      1 byte  reserved
172      1 u32   LID     .  (This is simply the record number of this record.)
173      1 u32   List of key-records (the first one is the primary key)
174      1 u32   List of uid-records
175      1 u32   cache record
176      1 byte  ownertrust
177      1 byte  dirflag
178      1 byte  validity
179     19 byte reserved
180
181
182 Record type 3:  (key record)
183 --------------
184     Informations about a primary public key.
185     (This is mainly used to lookup a trust record)
186
187      1 byte value 3
188      1 byte  reserved
189      1 u32   LID
190      1 u32   next   - next key record
191      7 bytes reserved
192      1 byte  keyflags
193      1 byte  pubkey algorithm
194      1 byte  length of the fingerprint (in bytes)
195      20 bytes fingerprint of the public key
196               (This is the value we use to identify a key)
197
198 Record type 4: (uid record)
199 --------------
200     Informations about a userid
201     We do not store the userid but the hash value of the userid because that
202     is sufficient.
203
204      1 byte value 4
205      1 byte reserved
206      1 u32  LID  points to the directory record.
207      1 u32  next   next userid
208      1 u32  pointer to preference record
209      1 u32  siglist  list of valid signatures
210      1 byte uidflags
211      1 byte reserved
212      20 bytes ripemd160 hash of the username.
213
214
215 Record type 5: (pref record)
216 --------------
217     Informations about preferences
218
219      1 byte value 5
220      1 byte   reserved
221      1 u32  LID; points to the directory record (and not to the uid record!).
222             (or 0 for standard preference record)
223      1 u32  next
224      30 byte preference data
225
226 Record type 6  (sigrec)
227 -------------
228     Used to keep track of key signatures. Self-signatures are not
229     stored.  If a public key is not in the DB, the signature points to
230     a shadow dir record, which in turn has a list of records which
231     might be interested in this key (and the signature record here
232     is one).
233
234      1 byte   value 6
235      1 byte   reserved
236      1 u32    LID           points back to the dir record
237      1 u32    next   next sigrec of this uid or 0 to indicate the
238                      last sigrec.
239      6 times
240         1 u32  Local_id of signators dir or shadow dir record
241         1 byte Flag: Bit 0 = checked: Bit 1 is valid (we have a real
242                               directory record for this)
243                          1 = valid is set (but my be revoked)
244
245
246
247 Record type 8: (shadow directory record)
248 --------------
249     This record is used to reserved a LID for a public key.  We
250     need this to create the sig records of other keys, even if we
251     do not yet have the public key of the signature.
252     This record (the record number to be more precise) will be reused
253     as the dir record when we import the real public key.
254
255      1 byte value 8
256      1 byte  reserved
257      1 u32   LID      (This is simply the record number of this record.)
258      2 u32   keyid
259      1 byte  pubkey algorithm
260      3 byte reserved
261      1 u32   hintlist   A list of records which have references to
262                         this key.  This is used for fast access to
263                         signature records which are not yet checked.
264                         Note, that this is only a hint and the actual records
265                         may not anymore hold signature records for that key
266                         but that the code cares about this.
267     18 byte reserved
268
269
270
271 Record type 9:  (cache record)
272 --------------
273     Used to bind the trustDB to the concrete instance of keyblock in
274     a pubring. This is used to cache information.
275
276      1 byte   value 9
277      1 byte   reserved
278      1 u32    Local-Id.
279      8 bytes  keyid of the primary key (needed?)
280      1 byte   cache-is-valid the following stuff is only
281               valid if this is set.
282      1 byte   reserved
283      20 bytes rmd160 hash value over the complete keyblock
284               This is used to detect any changes of the keyblock with all
285               CTBs and lengths headers. Calculation is easy if the keyblock
286               is obtained from a keyserver: simply create the hash from all
287               received data bytes.
288
289      1 byte   number of untrusted signatures.
290      1 byte   number of marginal trusted signatures.
291      1 byte   number of fully trusted signatures.
292               (255 is stored for all values greater than 254)
293      1 byte   Trustlevel
294                 0 = undefined (not calculated)
295                 1 = unknown
296                 2 = not trusted
297                 3 = marginally trusted
298                 4 = fully trusted
299                 5 = ultimately trusted (have secret key too).
300
301
302 Record Type 10 (hash table)
303 --------------
304     Due to the fact that we use fingerprints to lookup keys, we can
305     implement quick access by some simple hash methods, and avoid
306     the overhead of gdbm.  A property of fingerprints is that they can be
307     used directly as hash values.  (They can be considered as strong
308     random numbers.)
309       What we use is a dynamic multilevel architecture, which combines
310     hashtables, record lists, and linked lists.
311
312     This record is a hashtable of 256 entries; a special property
313     is that all these records are stored consecutively to make one
314     big table. The hash value is simple the 1st, 2nd, ... byte of
315     the fingerprint (depending on the indirection level).
316
317     When used to hash shadow directory records, a different table is used
318     and indexed by the keyid.
319
320      1 byte value 10
321      1 byte reserved
322      n u32  recnum; n depends on the record length:
323             n = (reclen-2)/4  which yields 9 for the current record length
324             of 40 bytes.
325
326     the total number of such record which makes up the table is:
327          m = (256+n-1) / n
328     which is 29 for a record length of 40.
329
330     To look up a key we use the first byte of the fingerprint to get
331     the recnum from this hashtable and look up the addressed record:
332        - If this record is another hashtable, we use 2nd byte
333          to index this hash table and so on.
334        - if this record is a hashlist, we walk all entries
335          until we found one a matching one.
336        - if this record is a key record, we compare the
337          fingerprint and to decide whether it is the requested key;
338
339
340 Record type 11 (hash list)
341 --------------
342     see hash table for an explanation.
343     This is also used for other purposes.
344
345     1 byte value 11
346     1 byte reserved
347     1 u32  next          next hash list record
348     n times              n = (reclen-5)/5
349         1 u32  recnum
350
351     For the current record length of 40, n is 7
352
353
354
355 Record type 254 (free record)
356 ---------------
357     All these records form a linked list of unused records.
358      1 byte  value 254
359      1 byte  reserved (0)
360      1 u32   next_free
361
362
363
364 Packet Headers
365 ===============
366
367 GNUPG uses PGP 2 packet headers and also understands OpenPGP packet header.
368 There is one enhancement used with the old style packet headers:
369
370    CTB bits 10, the "packet-length length bits", have values listed in
371    the following table:
372
373       00 - 1-byte packet-length field
374       01 - 2-byte packet-length field
375       10 - 4-byte packet-length field
376       11 - no packet length supplied, unknown packet length
377
378    As indicated in this table, depending on the packet-length length
379    bits, the remaining 1, 2, 4, or 0 bytes of the packet structure field
380    are a "packet-length field".  The packet-length field is a whole
381    number field.  The value of the packet-length field is defined to be
382    the value of the whole number field.
383
384    A value of 11 is currently used in one place: on compressed data.
385    That is, a compressed data block currently looks like <A3 01 . .  .>,
386    where <A3>, binary 10 1000 11, is an indefinite-length packet. The
387    proper interpretation is "until the end of the enclosing structure",
388    although it should never appear outermost (where the enclosing
389    structure is a file).
390
391 +  This will be changed with another version, where the new meaning of
392 +  the value 11 (see below) will also take place.
393 +
394 +  A value of 11 for other packets enables a special length encoding,
395 +  which is used in case, where the length of the following packet can
396 +  not be determined prior to writing the packet; especially this will
397 +  be used if large amounts of data are processed in filter mode.
398 +
399 +  It works like this: After the CTB (with a length field of 11) a
400 +  marker field is used, which gives the length of the following datablock.
401 +  This is a simple 2 byte field (MSB first) containing the amount of data
402 +  following this field, not including this length field. After this datablock
403 +  another length field follows, which gives the size of the next datablock.
404 +  A value of 0 indicates the end of the packet. The maximum size of a
405 +  data block is limited to 65534, thereby reserving a value of 0xffff for
406 +  future extensions. These length markers must be inserted into the data
407 +  stream just before writing the data out.
408 +
409 +  This 2 byte filed is large enough, because the application must buffer
410 +  this amount of data to prepend the length marker before writing it out.
411 +  Data block sizes larger than about 32k doesn't make any sense. Note
412 +  that this may also be used for compressed data streams, but we must use
413 +  another packet version to tell the application that it can not assume,
414 +  that this is the last packet.
415
416
417 Usage of gdbm files for keyrings
418 ================================
419     The key to store the keyblock is it's fingerprint, other records
420     are used for secondary keys.  fingerprints are always 20 bytes
421     where 16 bit fingerprints are appded with zero.
422     The first byte of the key gives some information on the type of the
423     key.
424       1 = key is a 20 bit fingerprint (16 bytes fpr are padded with zeroes)
425           data is the keyblock
426       2 = key is the complete 8 byte keyid
427           data is a list of 20 byte fingerprints
428       3 = key is the short 4 byte keyid
429           data is a list of 20 byte fingerprints
430       4 = key is the email address
431           data is a list of 20 byte fingerprints
432
433     Data is prepended with a type byte:
434       1 = keyblock
435       2 = list of 20 byte padded fingerprints
436       3 = list of list fingerprints (but how to we key them?)
437
438
439
440
441 Other Notes
442 ===========
443     * For packet version 3 we calculate the keyids this way:
444         RSA     := low 64 bits of n
445         ELGAMAL := build a v3 pubkey packet (with CTB 0x99) and calculate
446                    a rmd160 hash value from it. This is used as the
447                    fingerprint and the low 64 bits are the keyid.
448
449     * Revocation certificates consist only of the signature packet;
450       "import" knows how to handle this.  The rationale behind it is
451       to keep them small.
452
453
454 Supported targets:
455 ------------------
456       powerpc-unknown-linux-gnu  (linuxppc)
457       hppa1.1-hp-hpux10.20
458
459
460
461
462
463
464
465
466 Keyserver Message Format
467 -------------------------
468
469 The keyserver may be contacted by a Unix Domain socket or via TCP.
470
471 The format of a request is:
472
473 ----
474 command-tag
475 "Content-length:" digits
476 CRLF
477 ------
478
479 Where command-tag is
480
481 NOOP
482 GET <user-name>
483 PUT
484 DELETE <user-name>
485
486
487 The format of a response is:
488
489 ------
490 "GNUPG/1.0" status-code status-text
491 "Content-length:" digits
492 CRLF
493 ------------
494 followed by <digits> bytes of data
495
496
497 Status codes are:
498
499      o  1xx: Informational - Request received, continuing process
500
501      o  2xx: Success - The action was successfully received, understood,
502         and accepted
503
504      o  4xx: Client Error - The request contains bad syntax or cannot be
505         fulfilled
506
507      o  5xx: Server Error - The server failed to fulfill an apparently
508         valid request
509
510
511
512 Ich werde jetzt doch das HKP Protokoll implementieren:
513
514 Naja, die Doku ist so gut wie nichtexistent, da gebe ich Dir recht.
515 In kurzen Worten:
516
517 (Minimal-)HTTP-Server auf Port 11371, versteht ein GET auf /pks/lookup,
518 wobei die Query-Parameter (Key-Value-Paare mit = zwischen Key und
519 Value; die Paare sind hinter ? und durch & getrennt). Gültige
520 Operationen sind:
521
522 - - op (Operation) mit den Möglichkeiten index (gleich wie -kv bei
523   PGP), vindex (-kvv) und get (-kxa)
524 - - search: Liste der Worte, die im Key vorkommen müssen. Worte sind
525   mit Worttrennzeichen wie Space, Punkt, @, ... getrennt, Worttrennzeichen
526   werden nicht betrachtet, die Reihenfolge der Worte ist egal.
527 - - exact: (on=aktiv, alles andere inaktiv) Nur die Schlüssel
528   zurückgeben, die auch den "search"-String beinhalten (d.h.
529   Wortreihenfolge und Sonderzeichen sind wichtig)
530 - - fingerprint (Bei [v]index auch den Fingerprint ausgeben), "on"
531   für aktiv, alles andere inaktiv
532
533 Neu (wird von GNUPG benutzt):
534    /pks/lookup/<gnupg_formatierte_user_id>?op=<operation>
535
536 Zusätzlich versteht der Keyserver auch ein POST auf /pks/add, womit
537 man Keys hochladen kann.
538