c57b490aebb9c16e2be42119bb84ea8c1a869467
[gnupg.git] / doc / FAQ
1             GNU Privacy Guard -- Frequently Asked Questions
2            =================================================
3
4   This FAQ is partly compiled from messages of the developers mailing list.
5
6   Many thanks to Kirk Fort, Brian Warner, ...
7
8
9   Q: How does this whole thing work?
10   A: To generate a secret/public keypair, run
11
12       gpg --gen-key
13
14   and choose the default values.
15
16   Data that is encrypted with a public key can only be decrypted by the
17   matching secret key.  The secret key is protected by a password, the
18   public key is not.
19
20   So to send your friend a message, you would encrypt your message with his
21   public key, and he would only be able to decrypt it by having the secret
22   key and putting in the password to use his secret key.
23
24   GnuPG is also useful for signing things.  Things that are encrypted with
25   the secret key can be decrypted with the public key. To sign something, a
26   hash is taken of the data, and then the hash is in some form encoded with
27   the secret key. If someone has your public key, they can verify that it
28   is from you and that it hasn't changed by checking the encoded form of
29   the hash with the public key.
30
31   A keyring is just a large file that stores keys. You have a public keyring
32   where you store yours and your friend's public keys.  You have a secret
33   keyring that you keep your secret key on, and be very careful with this
34   secret keyring: Never ever give anyone else access to it and use a *good*
35   passphrase to protect the data in it.
36
37   You can 'conventionally' encrypt something by using the option 'gpg -c'.
38   It is encrypted using a passphrase, and does not use public and secret
39   keys.  If the person you send the data to knows that passphrase, they can
40   decrypt it. This is usually most useful for encrypting things to
41   yourself, although you can encrypt things to your own public key in the
42   same way.  It should be used for communication with partners you know and
43   where it is easy to exchange the passphrases (e.g. with your boy friend or
44   your wife).  The advantage is that you can change the passphrase from time
45   to time and decrease the risk, that many old messages may be decrypted by
46   people who accidently got your passphrase.
47
48   You can add and copy keys to and from your keyring with the 'gpg --import'
49   and 'gpg --export' option. 'gpg --export-secret-keys' will export secret
50   keys. This is normally not useful, but you can generate the key on one
51   machine then move it to another machine.
52
53   Keys can be signed under the 'gpg --edit-key' option.  When you sign a
54   key, you are saying that you are certain that the key belongs to the
55   person it says it comes from.  You should be very sure that is really
56   that person:  You should verify the key fingerprint
57
58       gpg --fingerprint user-id
59
60   over phone (if you really know the voice of the other person) or at
61   a key signing party (which are often held at computer conferences)
62   or at a meeting of your local GNU/Linux User Group.
63
64   Hmm, what else.  You may use the option  "-o filename" to force output
65   to this filename (use "-" to force output to stdout). "-r" just lets you
66   specify the recipient (which public key you encrypt with) on the command
67   line instead of typing it interactively.
68
69   Oh yeah, this is important. By default all data is encrypted in some weird
70   binary format.  If you want to have things appear in ASCII text that is
71   readable, just add the '-a' option.  But the preferred method is to use
72   a MIME aware mail reader (Mutt, Pine and many more).
73
74   There is a small security glitch in the OpenPGP (and therefore GnuPG) system;
75   to avoid this you should always sign and encrypt a message instead of only
76   encrypting it.
77
78
79  Q: What is the recommended key size?
80  A: 1024 bit for DSA signatures; even for plain ElGamal
81     signatures this is sufficient as the size of the hash
82     is probably the weakest link if the keysize is larger
83     than 1024 bits.  Encryption keys may have greater sizes,
84     but you should than check the fingerprint of this key:
85     "gpg --fingerprint --fingerprint <user ID>".
86
87  Q: Why are some signatures with an ELG-E key valid?
88  A: These are ElGamal Key generated by GnuPG in v3 (rfc1991)
89     packets.  The OpenPGP draft later changed the algorithm
90     identifier for ElGamal keys which are usable for signatures
91     and encryption from 16 to 20.  GnuPG now uses 20 when it
92     generates new ElGamal keys but still accept 16 (which is
93     according to OpenPGP "encryption only") if this key is in
94     a v3 packet.  GnuPG is the only program which had used
95     these v3 ElGamal keys - so this assumption is quite safe.
96
97  Q: Why is PGP 5.x not able to encrypt messages with some keys?
98  A: PGP Inc refuses to accept ElGamal keys of type 20 even for
99     encryption.  They only support type 16 (which is identical
100     at least for decryption).  To be more inter-operable, GnuPG
101     (starting with version 0.3.3) now also uses type 16 for the
102     ElGamal subkey which is created if the default key algorithm
103     is chosen.  You may add an type 16 ElGamal key to your public
104     key which is easy as your key signatures are still valid.
105
106  Q: Why is PGP 5.x not able to verify my messages?
107  A: PGP 5.x does not accept V4 signatures for data material but
108     OpenPGP requires generation of V4 signatures for all kind of
109     data.  Use the option "--force-v3-sigs" to generate V3 signatures
110     for data.
111
112  Q: I can't delete an user id because it is already deleted on my
113     public keyring?
114  A: Because you can only select from the public key ring, there is
115     no direct way to do this.  However it is not very complicated
116     to do it anyway.  Create a new user id with exactly the same name
117     and you will see that there are now two identical user ids on the
118     secret ring.  Now select this user id and delete it.  Both user
119     ids will be removed from the secret ring.
120
121  Q: How can I encrypt a message so that pgp 2.x is able to decrypt it?
122  A: You can't do that because pgp 2.x normally uses IDEA which is not
123     supported by GnuPG because it is patented, but if you have a modified
124     version of PGP you can try this:
125
126        gpg --rfc1991 --cipher-algo 3des ...
127
128     Please don't pipe the data to encrypt to gpg but give it as a filename;
129     other wise, pgp 2 will not be able to handle it.
130
131  Q: How can I conventional encrypt a message, so that PGP can decrypt it?
132  A: You can't do this for PGP 2.  For PGP 5 you should use this:
133
134        gpg -c --cipher-algo 3des --compress-algo 1 myfile
135
136     You may replace "3des" by "cast5". "blowfish" does not work with
137     all versions of pgp5.  You may also want to put
138        compress-algo 1
139     into your ~/.gnupg/options file - this does not affect normal
140     gnupg operation.
141
142
143   Q: Why does it sometimes take so long to create keys?
144   A: The problem here is that we need a lot of random bytes and for that
145   we (on Linux the /dev/random device) must collect some random data.
146   It is really not easy to fill the Linux internal entropy buffer; I
147   talked to Ted Ts'o and he commented that the best way to fill the buffer
148   is to play with your keyboard. Good security has it's price. What I do
149   is to hit several times on the shift, control, alternate, and capslock
150   keys, because these keys do not produce output to the screen. This way
151   you get your keys really fast (it's the same thing pgp2 does).
152
153   Another problem might be another program which eats up your random bytes
154   (a program (look at your daemons) that reads from /dev/[u]random).
155
156   Q: And it really takes long when I work on a remote system. Why?
157   A: Don't do this at all! You should never create keys or even use GnuPG
158   on a remote system because you normally have no physical control over
159   your secret keyring (which is in most cases vulnerable to advanced
160   dictionary attacks) - I strongly encourage everyone to only create keys
161   on a local computer (a disconnected laptop is probably the best choice)
162   and if you need it on your connected box (I know: We all do this) be
163   sure to have a strong password for your account and for your secret key
164   and trust your Root.
165
166   When I check GnuPG on a remote system via ssh (I have no Alpha here ;-)
167   I have the same problem.  It takes a *very* long time to create the
168   keys, so I use a special option, --quick-random, to generate insecure
169   keys which are only good for some tests.
170
171
172   Q: How does the whole trust thing work?
173   A: It works more or less like PGP.  The difference is that the trust is
174   computed at the time it is needed. This is one of the reasons for the
175   trustdb which holds a list of valid key signatures.  If you are not
176   running in batch mode you will be asked to assign a trust parameter
177   (ownertrust) to a key.
178
179   You can see the validity (calculated trust value) using this command.
180
181       gpgm --list-keys --with-colons
182
183   If the first field is "pub" or "uid", the second field shows you the trust:
184
185      o = Unknown (this key is new to the system)
186      e = The key has expired
187      q = Undefined (no value assigned)
188      n = Don't trust this key at all
189      m = There is marginal trust in this key
190      f = The key is full trusted.
191      u = The key is ultimately trusted; this
192          is only used for keys for which
193          the secret key is also available.
194      r = The key has been revoked
195      d = The key has been disabled
196
197   The value in the "pub" record is the best one of all "uid" records.
198
199   You can get a list of the assigned trust values (how much you trust
200   the owner to correctly sign another person's key)
201
202       gpgm --list-ownertrust
203
204   The first field is the fingerprint of the primary key, the second field
205   is the assigned value:
206
207       - = No Ownertrust value yet assigned.
208       n = Never trust this keyholder to correctly verify others signatures.
209       m = Have marginal trust in the keyholders capability to sign other keys.
210       f = Assume that the key holder really knows how to sign keys.
211       u = No need to trust ourself because we have the secret key.
212
213   Keep these values confidential because they express your opinions
214   about others.  PGP stores this information with the keyring thus
215   it is not a good idea to publish a PGP keyring instead of exporting the
216   keyring.  gnupg stores the trust in the trust-DB so it is okay
217   to give a gpg keyring away (but we have a --export command too).
218
219
220   Q: What is the difference between options and commands?
221   A: If you do a "gpg --help", you will get two separate lists. The first is
222   a list of commands. The second is a list of options. Whenever you run GPG,
223   you *must* pick exactly one command (**with one exception, see below). You
224   *may* pick one or more options.  The command should, just by convention,
225   come at the end of the argument list, after all the options. If the
226   command takes a file (all the basic ones do), the filename comes at the
227   very end. So the basic way to run gpg is:
228
229    gpg [--option something] [--option2] [--option3 something] --command file
230
231   Some options take arguments, for example the --output option (which can be
232   abbreviated -o) is an option that takes a filename. The option's argument
233   must follow immediately after the option itself, otherwise gpg doesn't know
234   which option the argument is supposed to go with. As an option, --output and
235   its filename must come before the command. The --remote-user (-r) option takes
236   a name or keyid to encrypt the message to, which must come right after the -r
237   argument.  The --encrypt (or -e) command comes after all the options followed
238   by the file you wish to encrypt. So use
239
240    gpg -r alice -o secret.txt -e test.txt
241
242   If you write the options out in full, it is easier to read
243
244    gpg --remote-user alice --output secret.txt --encrypt test.txt
245
246   If you're saving it in a file called ".txt" then you'd probably expect to see
247   ASCII-armored text in there, so you need to add the --armor (-a) option,
248   which doesn't take any arguments.
249
250    gpg --armor --remote-user alice --output secret.txt --encrypt test.txt
251
252   If you imagine square brackets around the optional parts, it becomes a bit
253   clearer:
254
255    gpg [--armor] [--remote-user alice] [--output secret.txt] --encrypt test.txt
256
257   The optional parts can be rearranged any way you want.
258
259    gpg --output secret.txt --remote-user alice --armor --encrypt test.txt
260
261   If your filename begins with a hyphen (e.g. "-a.txt"), gnupg assumes this is
262   an option and may complain.  To avoid this you have either to use
263   "./-a.txt" or stop the option and command processing  with two hyphens:
264   "-- -a.txt".
265
266   ** the exception: signing and encrypting at the same time. Use
267
268    gpg [--options] --sign --encrypt foo.txt
269
270
271   Q: What kind of output is this: "key C26EE891.298, uid 09FB: ...."?
272   A: This is the internal representation of an user id in the trustdb.
273      "C26EE891" is the keyid, "298" is the local id (a record number
274      in the trustdb) and "09FB" is the last two bytes of a ripe-md-160
275      hash of the user id for this key.
276
277
278   Q: What is trust, validity and ownertrust?
279   A: "ownertrust" is used instead of "trust" to make clear that
280      this is the value you have assigned to a key to express how much you
281      trust the owner of this key to correctly sign (and so introduce)
282      other keys.  "validity", or calculated trust, is a value which
283      says how much GnuPG thinks a key is valid (that it really belongs
284      to the one who claims to be the owner of the key).
285      For more see the chapter "The Web of Trust" in the
286      Manual [gpg: Oops: Internal error: manual not found - sorry]
287
288   Q: How do I interpret some of the informational outputs?
289   A: While checking the validity of a key, GnuPG sometimes prints
290      some information which is prefixed with information about
291      the checked item.
292         "key 12345678.3456"
293      This is about the key with key ID 12345678 and the internal
294      number 3456, which is the record number of the so called
295      directory record in the trustdb.
296         "uid 12345678.3456/ACDE"
297      This is about the user ID for the same key.  To identify the
298      user ID the last two bytes of a ripe-md-160 over the user ID
299      ring is printed.
300         "sig 12345678.3456/ACDE/9A8B7C6D"
301      This is about the signature with key ID 9A8B7C6D for the
302      above key and user ID, if it is a signature which is direct
303      on a key, the user ID part is empty (..//..).
304
305
306   Q: How do I sign a patch file?
307   A: Use "gpg --clearsign --not-dash-escaped ...".
308      The problem with --clearsign is that all lines starting with a dash are
309      quoted with "- "; obviously diff produces many of lines starting with a
310      dash and these are then quoted and that is not good for patch ;-).  To
311      use a patch file without removing the cleartext signature, the special
312      option --not-dash-escaped may be used to suppress generation of these
313      escape sequences.  You should not mail such a patch because spaces and
314      line endings are also subject to the signature and a mailer may not
315      preserve these.  If you want to mail a file you can simply sign it
316      using your MUA.
317
318
319   Q: Where is the "encrypt-to-self" option?
320   A: Use "--encrypt-to your_keyid".  You can use more than one
321      of these options. To temporary override the use of this additional
322      keys, you can use the option "--no-encrypt-to".
323
324
325   Q: How can I get rid of the Version and Comment headers in
326      armored messages?
327   A: Use "--no-version --comment ''".  Note that the left over blank line
328      is required by the protocol.
329
330
331   Q: What does the "You are using the xxxx character set." mean?
332   A: This note is printed when UTF8 mapping has to be done.  Make sure that
333      the displayed charset is the one you have activated on your system
334      "iso-8859-1" is the most used one, so this is the default.  You can
335      change the charset with the option "--charset".  It is important that
336      you active characterset matches the one displayed - if not, restrict
337      yourself to plain 7 bit ASCII and no mapping has to be done.
338
339   Q: How do I transfer owner trust values from PGP to GnuPG?
340   A: There is a script in the tools directory to help you:
341      After you have imported the PGP keyring you can give this command:
342         $ lspgpot pgpkeyring | gpg --import-ownertrust
343
344