84faf1cddeabb27f48dbb3b336bf031b13431f96
[gnupg.git] / tests / openpgp / README
1 #                                   Emacs, this is an -*- org -*- file.
2
3 * How to run the test suite
4 From your build directory, run
5
6   obj $ make -C tests/openpgp check
7
8 to run all tests or
9
10   obj $ make -C tests/openpgp check XTESTS=your-test.scm
11
12 to run a specific test (or any number of tests separated by spaces).
13
14 If you want to debug a test, add verbose=1 to see messages printed by
15 spawned programs to their standard error stream, verbose=2 to see what
16 programs are executed, or verbose=3 to see even more program output
17 and exit codes.
18
19 ** Passing options to the test driver
20
21 You can set TESTFLAGS to pass flags to 'run-tests.scm'.  For example,
22 to speed up the test suite when bisecting, do
23
24   obj $ make -C tests/openpgp check TESTFLAGS=--parallel
25
26 See below for the arguments supported by the driver.
27
28 ** Calling the test driver directly
29 This is a bit tricky because one needs to manually set some
30 environment variables.  We should make that easier.  See discussion
31 below.  From your build directory, do:
32
33   obj $ TMP=/tmp srcdir=<path to>/tests/openpgp \
34         GPGSCM_PATH=<path to>/tests/gpgscm:<path to>/tests/openpgp \
35         $(pwd)/tests/gpgscm/gpgscm [gpgscm args] \
36         run-tests.scm [test suite runner args]
37
38 *** Arguments supported by the test suite runner
39 The test suite runner supports four modes of operation,
40 {sequential,parallel}x{isolated,shared}.  You can select the mode of
41 operation using a combination of the flags --parallel, --sequential,
42 --shared, and --isolated.
43
44 By default the tests are run in sequential order, each one in a clean
45 environment.
46
47 You can specify the tests to run as positional arguments relative to
48 srcdir (e.g. just 'version.scm').  By default all tests listed in
49 run-tests.scm are executed.  Note that you do not have to specify
50 setup.scm and finish.scm, they are executed implicitly.
51
52 The test suite runner can be executed in any location that the current
53 user can write to.  It will create temporary files and directories,
54 but will in general clean up all of them.
55 *** Discussion of the various environment variables
56 **** srcdir
57 Must be set to the source of the openpgp test suite.  Used to locate
58 data files.
59 **** GPGSCM_PATH
60 Used to locate the Scheme library as well as code used by the test
61 suite.
62 **** BIN_PREFIX
63 The test suite does not hardcode any paths to tools.  If set it is
64 used to locate the tools to test, otherwise the test suite assumes to
65 be run from the build directory.
66 **** MKTDATA and GPG_PRESET_PASSPHRASE
67 These two tools are not installed by 'make install', hence we need to
68 explicitly override their position.  In fact, the location of any tool
69 used by the test suite can be overridden this way.  See defs.scm.
70 **** argv[0]
71 run-tests.scm depends on being able to re-exec gpgscm.  It uses
72 argv[0] for that.  Therefore you must use an absolute path to invoke
73 gpgscm.
74 * How to write tests
75 gpgscm provides a number of functions to aid you in writing tests, as
76 well as bindings to process management abstractions provided by GnuPG.
77 For the Scheme environment provided by TinySCHEME, see the TinySCHEME
78 manual that is included in tests/gpgscm/Manual.txt.
79
80 For a quick start, please have a look at various tests that are
81 already implemented, e.g. 'encrypt.scm'.
82 ** The test framework
83 The functions info, error, and skip display their first argument and
84 flush the output buffers.  error and skip will also terminate the
85 process, signaling that the test failed or should be skipped.
86
87 (for-each-p msg proc list) will display msg, and call proc with each
88 element of list while displaying the progress appropriately.
89 for-each-p' is similar, but accepts another callback before the 'list'
90 argument to format each item.  for-each-p can be safely nested, and
91 the inner progress indicator will be abbreviated using '.'.
92 ** Temporary files
93 (lettmp <bindings> <body>) will create and delete temporary files that
94 you can use in <body>.  (with-temporary-working-directory <body>) will
95 create a temporary director, change to that, and clean it up after
96 executing <body>).
97
98 make-temporary-file will create a temporary file.  You can optionally
99 provide an argument to that function that will serve as tag so you can
100 distinguish the files for debugging.  remove-temporary-file will
101 delete a file created using make-temporary-file.
102
103 ** Monadic transformer and pipe support
104 Tests often perform sequential transformations on files, or connect
105 processes using pipes.  To aid you in this, the test framework
106 provides two monadic data structures.
107
108 (Currently, the implementation mashes the 'bind' operation together
109 with the application of the monad.  Also, there is no 'return'
110 operation.  I guess all of that could be implemented on top of
111 call/cc, but it isn't at the moment.)
112 *** pipe
113 The pipe monad constructs pipe lines.  It consists of a function
114 pipe:do that binds the functions together and manages the execution of
115 the child processes, a family of functions that act as sources, a
116 function to spawn processes, and a family of functions acting as
117 sinks.
118
119 Sources are pipe:open, pipe:defer, pipe:echo.  To spawn a process use
120 pipe:spawn, or the convenience function pipe:gpg.  To sink the data
121 use pipe:splice, or pipe:write-to.
122
123 Example:
124
125   (pipe:do
126     (pipe:echo "3\n1\n2\n")
127     (pipe:spawn '("/usr/bin/sort"))
128     (pipe:write-to "sorted" (logior O_WRONLY O_CREAT) #o600))
129
130 Caveats: Due to the single-threaded nature of gpgscm you cannot use
131 both a source and sink that is implemented in Scheme.  pipe:defer and
132 pipe:echo are executing in gpgscm, and so does pipe:splice.
133 *** tr
134 The transformer monad describes sequential file transformations.
135
136 There is one source function, tr:open.  To describe a transformation
137 using some process, use tr:spawn, tr:gpg, or tr:pipe-do.  There are
138 several sinks, although sink is not quite the right term, because the
139 data is not consumed, and hence one can use them at any position.  The
140 "sinks" are tr:write-to, tr:call-with-content, tr:assert-identity, and
141 tr:assert-weak-identity.
142
143 A somewhat contrived example demonstrating many functions is:
144
145   (tr:do
146     (tr:pipe-do
147       (pipe:echo "3\n1\n2\n")
148       (pipe:spawn '("/usr/bin/sort")))
149     (tr:write-to "reference")
150     (tr:call-with-content
151      (lambda (c)
152        (echo "currently, c contains" (string-length c) "bytes")))
153     (tr:spawn "" '("/usr/bin/gcc" -x c "-E" -o **out** **in**))
154     (tr:pipe-do
155       (pipe:spawn '("/bin/grep" -v "#")))
156     (tr:assert-identity "reference"))
157
158 Caveats: As a convenience, gpgscm allows one to specify command line
159 arguments as Scheme symbols.  Scheme symbols, however, are
160 case-insensitive, and get converted to lower case.  Therefore, the -E
161 argument must be given as a string in the example above.  Similarly,
162 you need to quote numerical values.
163 ** Process management
164 If you just need to execute a single command, there is (call-with-fds
165 cmdline infd outfd errfd) which executes cmdline with the given file
166 descriptors bound to it, and waits for its completion returning the
167 status code.  There is (call cmdline) which is similar, but calls the
168 command with a closed stdin, connecting stdout and stderr to stderr if
169 gpgscm is executed with --verbose.  (call-check cmdline) raises an
170 exception if the command does not return 0.
171
172 (call-popen cmdline input) calls a command, writes input to its stdin,
173 and returns any output from stdout, or raises an exception containing
174 stderr on failure.
175 * Sample messages