2004-01-29 Marcus Brinkmann <marcus@g10code.de>
[gnupg.git] / tools / README.gpgconf
1 ============
2   GPG Conf
3 ============
4
5 CONCEPT
6 =======
7
8 gpgconf provides access to the configuration of one or more components
9 of the GnuPG system.  These components correspond more or less to the
10 programs that exist in the GnuPG framework, like GnuPG, GPGSM,
11 DirMngr, etc.  But this is not a strict one-to-one relationship.  Not
12 all configuration options are available through GPGConf.  GPGConf
13 provides a generic and abstract method to access the most important
14 configuration options that can feasibly be controlled via such a
15 mechanism.
16
17 GPGConf can be used to gather and change the options available in each
18 component, and can also provide their default values.  GPGConf will
19 give detailed type information that can be used to restrict the user's
20 input without making an attempt to commit the changes.
21
22 GPGConf provides the backend of a configuration editor.  The
23 configuration editor would usually be a graphical user interface
24 program, that allows to display the current options, their default
25 values, and allows the user to make changes to the options.  These
26 changes can then be made active with GPGConf again.  Such a program
27 that uses GPGConf in this way will be called 'GUI' throughout this
28 document.
29
30
31 Format Conventions
32 ==================
33
34 Some lines in the output of GPGConf contain a list of colon-separated
35 fields.  The following conventions apply:
36
37 The GUI program is required to strip off trailing newline and/or carriage
38 return characters from the output.
39
40 GPGConf will never leave out fields.  If a certain version documents a
41 certain field, this field will always be present in all GPGConf
42 versions from that time on.
43
44 Future versions of GPGConf might append fields to the list.  New
45 fields will always be separated from the previously last field by a
46 colon separator.  The GUI should be prepared to parse the last field
47 it knows about up until a colon or end of line.
48
49 Not all fields are defined under all conditions.  You are required to
50 ignore the content of undefined fields.
51
52 Some fields contain strings that are not escaped in any way.  Such
53 fields are described to be used "verbatim".  These fields will never
54 contain a colon character (for obvious reasons).  No de-escaping or
55 other formatting is required to use the field content.  This is for
56 easy parsing of the output, when it is known that the content can
57 never contain any special characters.
58
59 Some fields contain strings that are described to be
60 "percent-escaped".  Such strings need to be de-escaped before their
61 content can be presented to the user.  A percent-escaped string is
62 de-escaped by replacing all occurences of %XY by the byte that has the
63 hexadecimal value XY.  X and Y are from the set { '0'..'9', 'a'..'f' }.
64
65 Some fields contain strings that are described to be "localised".  Such
66 strings are translated to the active language and formatted in the
67 active character set.
68
69 Some fields contain an unsigned number.  This number will always fit
70 into a 32-bit unsigned integer variable.  The number may be followed
71 by a space, followed by a human readable description of that value.
72 You should ignore everything in the field that follows the number.
73
74 Some fields contain a signed number.  This number will always fit into
75 a 32-bit signed integer variable.  The number may be followed by a
76 space, followed by a human readable description of that value.  You
77 should ignore everything in the field that follows the number.
78
79 Some fields contain an option argument.  The format of an option
80 argument depends on the type of the option and on some flags:
81
82 The simplest case is that the option does not take an argument at all
83 (TYPE is 0).  Then the option argument is either empty if the option
84 is not set, or an unsigned number that specifies how often the option
85 occurs.  If the LIST flag is not set, then the only valid number is 1.
86
87 If the option takes a number argument (ALT-TYPE is 2 or 3), and it can
88 only occur once (LIST flag is not set), then the option argument is
89 either empty if the option is not set, or it is a number.  A number is
90 a string that begins with an optional minus character, followed by one
91 or more digits.  The number must fit into an integer variable
92 (unsigned or signed, depending on ALT-TYPE).
93
94 If the option takes a number argument and it can occur more than once,
95 then the option argument is either empty, or it is a comma-separated
96 list of numbers as described above.
97
98 If the option takes a string argument (ALT-TYPE is 1), and it can only
99 occur once (LIST flag is not set) then the option argument is either
100 empty if the option is not set, or it starts with a double quote
101 character (") followed by a percent-escaped string that is the
102 argument value.  Note that there is only a leading double quote
103 character, no trailing one.  The double quote character is only needed
104 to be able to differentiate between no value and the empty string as
105 value.
106
107 If the option takes a string argument and it can occur more than once,
108 then the option argument is either empty or it starts with a double
109 quote character (") followed by a comma-separated list of
110 percent-escaped strings.  Obviously any commas in the individual
111 strings must be percent-escaped.
112
113
114 FIXME: Document the active language and active character set.  Allow
115 to change it via the command line?
116
117
118 Components
119 ==========
120
121 A component is a set of configuration options that semantically belong
122 together.  Furthermore, several changes to a component can be made in
123 an atomic way with a single operation.  The GUI could for example
124 provide a menu with one entry for each component, or a window with one
125 tabulator sheet per component.
126
127 The following interface is provided to list the available components:
128
129 Command --list-components
130 -------------------------
131
132 Outputs a list of all components available, one per line.  The format
133 of each line is:
134
135 NAME:DESCRIPTION
136
137 NAME
138
139 This field contains a name tag of the component.  The name tag is used
140 to specify the component in all communication with GPGConf.  The name
141 tag is to be used verbatim.  It is not in any escaped format.
142
143 DESCRIPTION
144
145 The string in this field contains a human-readable description of the
146 component.  It can be displayed to the user of the GUI for
147 informational purposes.  It is percent-escaped and localized.
148
149 Example:
150 $ gpgconf --list-components
151 gpg-agent:GPG Agent
152 dirmngr:CRL Manager
153
154
155 OPTIONS
156 =======
157
158 Every component contains one or more options.  Options may belong to a
159 group.  The following command lists all options and the groups they
160 belong to:
161
162 Command --list-options COMPONENT
163 --------------------------------
164
165 Lists all options (and the groups they belong to) in the component
166 COMPONENT.  COMPONENT is the string in the field NAME in the
167 output of the --list-components command.
168
169 There is one line for each option and each group.  First come all
170 options that are not in any group.  Then comes a line describing a
171 group.  Then come all options that belong into each group.  Then comes
172 the next group and so on.
173
174 The format of each line is:
175
176 NAME:FLAGS:LEVEL:DESCRIPTION:TYPE:ALT-TYPE:ARGNAME:DEFAULT:VALUE
177
178 NAME
179
180 This field contains a name tag for the group or option.  The name tag
181 is used to specify the group or option in all communication with
182 GPGConf.  The name tag is to be used verbatim.  It is not in any
183 escaped format.
184
185 FLAGS
186
187 The flags field contains an unsigned number.  Its value is the
188 OR-wise combination of the following flag values:
189
190         1 group         If this flag is set, this is a line describing
191                         a group and not an option.
192   O     2 optional arg  If this flag is set, the argument is optional.
193   O     4 list          If this flag is set, the option can be given
194                         multiple times.
195   O     8 runtime       If this flag is set, the option can be changed
196                         at runtime.
197
198 Flags marked with a 'O' are only defined for options (ie, if the GROUP
199 flag is not set).
200
201 LEVEL
202
203 This field is defined for options and for groups.  It contains an
204 unsigned number that specifies the expert level under which this group
205 or option should be displayed.  The following expert levels are
206 defined for options (they have analogous meaning for groups):
207
208         0 basic         This option should always be offered to the user.
209         1 advanced      This option may be offered to advanced users.
210         2 expert        This option should only be offered to expert users.
211         3 invisible     This option should normally never be displayed,
212                         not even to expert users.
213         4 internal      This option is for internal use only.  Ignore it.
214
215 The level of a group will always be the lowest level of all options it
216 contains.
217
218 DESCRIPTION
219
220 This field is defined for options and groups.  The string in this
221 field contains a human-readable description of the option or group.
222 It can be displayed to the user of the GUI for informational purposes.
223 It is percent-escaped and localized.
224
225 TYPE
226
227 This field is only defined for options.  It contains an unsigned
228 number that specifies the type of the option's argument, if any.
229 The following types are defined:
230
231         0 none          No argument allowed.
232         1 string        An unformatted string.
233         2 int32         A signed integer number.
234         3 uint32        An unsigned integer number.
235         4 pathname      A string that describes the pathname of a file.
236                         The file does not necessarily need to exist.
237         5 ldap server   A string that describes an LDAP server in the format
238                         HOSTNAME:PORT:USERNAME:PASSWORD:BASE_DN.
239
240 More types will be added in the future.  Please see the ALT-TYPE field
241 for information on how to cope with unknown types.
242
243 ALT-TYPE
244
245 This field is identical to TYPE, except that only the types 0 to 3 are
246 allowed.  The GUI is expected to present the user the option in the
247 format specified by TYPE.  But if the argument type TYPE is not
248 supported by the GUI, it can still display the option in the more
249 generic basic type ALT-TYPE.  The GUI must support the basic types 0
250 to 3 to be able to display all options.
251
252 ARGNAME
253
254 This field is only defined for options with an argument type TYPE that
255 is not 0.  In this case it may contain a percent-escaped and localised
256 string that gives a short name for the argument.  The field may also
257 be empty, though, in which case a short name is not known.
258
259 DEFAULT
260
261 This field is defined only for options.  Its format is that of an
262 option argument (see section Format Conventions for details).  If the
263 default value is empty, then no default is known.  Otherwise, the
264 value specifies the default value for this option.  Note that this
265 field is also meaningful if the option itself does not take a real
266 argument.
267
268 VALUE
269
270 This field is defined only for options.  Its format is that of an
271 option argument.  If it is empty, then the option is not explicitely
272 set in the current configuration, and the default applies (if any).
273 Otherwise, it contains the current value of the option.  Note that
274 this field is also meaningful if the option itself does not take a
275 real argument.
276
277
278 CHANGING OPTIONS
279 ================
280
281 To change the options for a component, you must provide them in the
282 following format:
283
284 NAME:NEW-VALUE
285
286 NAME
287
288 This is the name of the option to change.
289
290 NEW-VALUE
291
292 The new value for the option.  The format is that of an option
293 argument.  If it is empty (or the field is omitted), the option will
294 be deleted, so that the default value is used.  Otherwise, the option
295 will be set to the specified value.
296
297 Option --runtime
298 ----------------
299
300 If this option is set, the changes will take effect at run-time, as
301 far as this is possible.  Otherwise, they will take effect at the next
302 start of the respective backend programs.
303
304
305 BACKENDS
306 ========
307
308 Backends should support the following commands:
309
310 Command --gpgconf-list
311 ----------------------
312
313 List the location of the configuration file, and all default values of
314 all options.  The location of the configuration file must be an
315 absolute pathname.
316
317 Example:
318 $ dirmngr --gpgconf-list
319 gpgconf-config-file:/mnt/marcus/.gnupg/dirmngr.conf
320 ldapservers-file:/mnt/marcus/.gnupg/dirmngr_ldapservers.conf
321 add-servers:
322 max-replies:10