doc: Typo fixes
[gnupg.git] / doc / dirmngr.texi
index d1d4211..5b73d7b 100644 (file)
@@ -238,31 +238,46 @@ useful for debugging.
 
 @item --use-tor
 @opindex use-tor
-This option switches Dirmngr and thus GnuPG into ``TOR mode'' to route
-all network access via TOR (an anonymity network).  WARNING: As of now
+This option switches Dirmngr and thus GnuPG into ``Tor mode'' to route
+all network access via Tor (an anonymity network).  WARNING: As of now
 this still leaks the DNS queries; e.g. to lookup the hosts in a
 keyserver pool.  Certain other features are disabled if this mode is
 active.
 
-@item --keyserver @code{name}
+@item --keyserver @var{name}
 @opindex keyserver
-Use @code{name} as your keyserver.  This is the server that @command{gpg}
+Use @var{name} as your keyserver.  This is the server that @command{gpg}
 communicates with to receive keys, send keys, and search for
-keys.  The format of the @code{name} is a URI:
+keys.  The format of the @var{name} is a URI:
 `scheme:[//]keyservername[:port]' The scheme is the type of keyserver:
 "hkp" for the HTTP (or compatible) keyservers, "ldap" for the LDAP
 keyservers, or "mailto" for the Graff email keyserver. Note that your
 particular installation of GnuPG may have other keyserver types
 available as well. Keyserver schemes are case-insensitive. After the
 keyserver name, optional keyserver configuration options may be
-provided. These are the same as the global @option{--keyserver-options}
-from below, but apply only to this particular keyserver.
+provided.  These are the same as the @option{--keyserver-options} of
+@command{gpg}, but apply only to this particular keyserver.
 
 Most keyservers synchronize with each other, so there is generally no
 need to send keys to more than one server. The keyserver
 @code{hkp://keys.gnupg.net} uses round robin DNS to give a different
 keyserver each time you use it.
 
+If exactly two keyservers are configured and only one is a Tor hidden
+service (.onion), Dirmngr selects the keyserver to use depending on
+whether Tor is locally running or not.  The check for a running Tor is
+done for each new connection.
+
+
+@item --nameserver @var{ipaddr}
+@opindex nameserver
+In ``Tor mode'' Dirmngr uses a public resolver via Tor to resolve DNS
+names.  If the default public resolver, which is @code{8.8.8.8}, shall
+not be used a different one can be given using this option.  Note that
+a numerical IP address must be given (IPv6 or IPv4) and that no error
+checking is done for @var{ipaddr}.  DNS queries in Tor mode do only
+work if GnuPG as been build with ADNS support.
+
 @item --disable-ldap
 @opindex disable-ldap
 Entirely disables the use of LDAP.
@@ -1002,7 +1017,7 @@ as a binary blob.
 @c
 @c Here we may encounter a recursive situation:
 @c @code{validate_cert_chain} needs to look at other certificates and
-@c also at CRLs to check whether tehse other certificates and well, the
+@c also at CRLs to check whether these other certificates and well, the
 @c CRL issuer certificate itself are not revoked.  FIXME: We need to make
 @c sure that @code{validate_cert_chain} does not try to lookup the CRL we
 @c are currently processing. This would be a catch-22 and may indicate a