Allow setting of the passphrase encoding of pkcs#12 files.
[gnupg.git] / doc / gpgsm.texi
index 9df760c..451f09a 100644 (file)
@@ -233,11 +233,11 @@ a few informational lines are prepended before each block.
 
 @item --export-secret-key-p12 @var{key-id}
 @opindex export
-Export the private key and the certificate identified by @var{key-id}
-in a PKCS#12 format. When using along with the @code{--armor} option
-a few informational lines are prepended to the output.  Note, that the
-PKCS#12 format is higly insecure and this command is only provided if
-there is no other way to exchange the private key.
+Export the private key and the certificate identified by @var{key-id} in
+a PKCS#12 format. When using along with the @code{--armor} option a few
+informational lines are prepended to the output.  Note, that the PKCS#12
+format is not very secure and this command is only provided if there is
+no other way to exchange the private key. (@pxref{option --p12-charset})
 
 @item --import [@var{files}]
 @opindex import
@@ -437,6 +437,19 @@ Assume the input data is plain base-64 encoded.
 @opindex assume-binary
 Assume the input data is binary encoded.
 
+@anchor{option --p12-charset}
+@item --p12-charset @var{name}
+@opindex p12-charset
+@command{gpgsm} uses the UTF-8 encoding when encoding passphrases for
+PKCS#12 files.  This option may be used to force the passphrase to be
+encoded in the specified encoding @var{name}.  This is useful if the
+application used to import the key uses a different encoding and thus
+won't be able to import a file generated by @command{gpgsm}.  Commonly
+used values for @var{name} are @code{Latin1} and @code{CP850}.  Note
+that @command{gpgsm} itself automagically imports any file with a
+passphrase encoded to the most commonly used encodings.
+
+
 @item --local-user @var{user_id}
 @item -u @var{user_id}
 @opindex local-user