add-key works
[libgcrypt.git] / README
diff --git a/README b/README
index 9318390..ebfa2c1 100644 (file)
--- a/README
+++ b/README
 
-            G10 - The GNU Enryption and Signing Tool
-           ------------------------------------------
+                 GNUPG - The GNU Privacy Guard
+                -------------------------------
 
+    THIS IS ALPHA SOFTWARE, YOU MAY ENCOUNTER SOME BUGS.
 
-    THIS IS VERSION IS ONLY a TEST VERSION !  YOU SHOULD NOT
-    USE IT FOR OTHER PURPOSES THAN EVALUATING THE CURRENT CODE.
+    On a Linux box (version 2.x.x, alpha or x86 CPU) it should
+    work reliably.  You may create your key on such a machine and
+    use it.  Please verify the tar file; there is a PGP and a GNUPG
+    signature available. My PGP key is well known and published in
+    the "Global Trust Register for 1998", ISBN 0-9532397-0-5.
 
-    * The data format may change in the next version!
+    I have included my pubring as "g10/pubring.asc", which contains
+    the key used to make GNUPG signatures:
+    "pub  1312G/FF3EAA0B 1998-02-09 Werner Koch <wk@isil.d.shuttle.de>"
+    "Key fingerprint = 8489 6CD0 1851 0E33 45DA  CD67 036F 11B8 FF3E AA0B"
 
-    * The code to generate keys is not secure!
+    You may add it to your GNUPG pubring and use it in the future to
+    verify new releases.  Because you verified the tar file containing
+    this file here, you can be sure that the above fingerprint is correct.
 
-    * Some features are not implemented
+    Please subscribe to g10@net.lut.ac.uk by sending a mail with
+    the word "subscribe" in the body to "g10-request@net.lut.ac.uk".
 
+    See the file COPYING for copyright and warranty information.
 
-    I provide this version as a reality check to start discussion.
-    Please subscribe to g10@net.lut.ac.uk be sending a mail with
-    the word "subscribe" in the body to "g10-request@net.lut.ac.uk".
+    Due to the fact that GNUPG does not use use any patented algorithm,
+    it cannot be compatible with old PGP versions, because those use
+    IDEA (which is patented worldwide) and RSA (which is patented in
+    the United States until Sep 20, 2000).  I'm sorry about this, but
+    this is the world we have created (e.g. by using proprietary software).
 
+    Because the OpenPGP standard is still a draft, GNUPG is not yet
+    compatible with it (or PGP 5) - but it will be.  The data structures
+    used are compatible with PGP 2.x, so it can parse and list such files
+    and PGP should be able to parse data created by GNUPG and complain
+    about unsupported algorithms.
 
-    See the file COPYING for copyright and warranty information.
+    The default algorithms used by GNUPG are ElGamal for public-key
+    encryption and signing; Blowfish with a 128 bit key for protecting
+    the secret-key components, conventional and session encryption;
+    RIPE MD-160 to create message digest.  DSA, SHA-1, CAST and TIGER are
+    also implemented, but not used by default. I decided not
+    to use DSA as the default signing algorithm, because it allows only
+    for 1024 bit keys and this may not be enough in a couple of years.
 
 
-    Due to the fact that G10 does not use use any patented algorithm,
-    it cannot be compatible to old PGP versions, because those use
-    IDEA (which is worldwide patented) and RSA (which is patented in
-    the United States until Sep 20, 2000).  I'm sorry about this, but
-    this is the world we have created (e.g. by using propiertary software).
 
+    Installation
+    ------------
 
-    Because the OpenPGP standard is still a draft, G10 is not yet
-    compatible to it (or PGP 5) - but it will. The data structures
-    used are compatible with PGP 2.x, so it can parse an list such files
-    and PGP should be able to parse data created by G10 and complain
-    about unsupported alogorithms.
+    See the file INSTALL.  Here is a quick summary:
+
+    1) "./configure"
+
+    2) "make"
+
+    3) "make install"
+
+    4) You end up with a binary "gpg" in /usr/local/bin
+
+    5) Optional, but suggested: install the program "gpg" as suid root.
+
+
+
+    Key Generation
+    --------------
+
+       gpg --gen-key
+
+    This asks some questions and then starts key generation. To create
+    good random numbers for prime number generation, it uses a /dev/random
+    which will only emit bytes if the kernel can gather enough entropy.
+    If you see no progress, you should start some other activities such
+    as mouse moves, "find /" or using the keyboard (in another window).
+    Because we have no hardware device to generate randomness we have to
+    use this method.
+
+    Key generation shows progress by printing different characters to
+    stderr:
+            "."  Last 10 Miller-Rabin tests failed
+            "+"  Miller-Rabin test succeeded
+            "!"  Reloading the pool with fresh prime numbers
+            "^"  Checking a new value for the generator
+            "<"  Size of one factor decreased
+            ">"  Size of one factor increased
+
+    The prime number for ElGamal is generated this way:
+
+    1) Make a prime number q of 160, 200, 240 bits (depending on the keysize)
+    2) Select the length of the other prime factors to be at least the size
+       of q and calculate the number of prime factors needed
+    3) Make a pool of prime numbers, each of the length determined in step 2
+    4) Get a new permutation out of the pool or continue with step 3
+       if we have tested all permutations.
+    5) Calculate a candidate prime p = 2 * q * p[1] * ... * p[n] + 1
+    6) Check that this prime has the correct length (this may change q if
+       it seems not to be possible to make a prime of the desired length)
+    7) Check whether this is a prime using trial divisions and the
+       Miller-Rabin test.
+    8) Continue with step 4 if we did not find a prime in step 7.
+    9) Find a generator for that prime.
+
+    You should make a revocation certificate in case someone gets
+    knowledge of your secret key or you forgot your passphrase:
+
+       gpg --gen-revoke your_user_id
+
+    Run this command and store it away; output is always ASCII armored,
+    so that you can print it and (hopefully never) re-create it if
+    your electronic media fails.
+
+
+    You can sign a key with this command:
+
+       gpg --sign-key Donald
+
+    This let you sign the key of "Donald" with your default userid.
+
+       gpg --sign-key -u Karl -u Joe Donald
+
+    This let you sign the key of of "Donald" with the userids of "Karl"
+    and "Joe".
+    All existing signatures are checked; if some are invalid, a menu is
+    offered to delete some of them, and then you are asked for every user
+    whether you want to sign this key.
+
+    You may remove a signature at any time using the option "--edit-sig",
+    which asks for the sigs to remove. Self-signatures are not removable.
+
+
+
+
+    Sign
+    ----
+
+       gpg -s file
+
+    This creates a file file.gpg which is compressed and has a signature
+    attached.
+
+       gpg -sa file
+
+    Same as above, but file.gpg is ascii armored.
+
+       gpg -s -o out file
+
+    Creates a signature of file, but writes the output to the file "out".
+
+
+    Encrypt
+    -------
+
+       gpg -e -r heine file
+
+    This encrypts files with the public key of "heine" and writes it
+    to "file.gpg"
+
+       echo "hallo" | gpg -ea -r heine | mail heine
+
+    Ditto, but encrypts "hallo\n" and mails it as ascii armored message.
+
+
+    Sign and Encrypt
+    ----------------
+
+       gpg -se -r heine file
+
+    This encrypts files with the public key of "heine" and writes it
+    to "file.gpg" after signing it with the default user id.
+
+
+       gpg -se -r heine -u Suttner file
+
+    Ditto, but sign the file with the user id "Suttner"
+
+
+    Keyring Management
+    ------------------
+    To export your complete keyring(s) do this:
+
+       gpg --export
+
+    To export only some user ids do this:
+
+       gpg --export userids
+
+    Use "-a" or "--armor" to create ASCII armored output.
+
+    Importing keys is done with the option, you guessed it, "--import":
+
+       gpg --import [filenames]
+
+    New keys are appended to the default keyring and already existing
+    keys are merged.  Keys without a self-signature are ignored.
+
+
+    How to Specify a UserID
+    -----------------------
+    There are several ways to specify a userID, here are some examples:
+
+    * Only by the short keyid (prepend a zero if it begins with A..F):
+
+       "234567C4"
+       "0F34E556E"
+       "01347A56A"
+       "0xAB123456
+
+    * By a complete keyid:
+
+       "234AABBCC34567C4"
+       "0F323456784E56EAB"
+       "01AB3FED1347A5612"
+       "0x234AABBCC34567C4"
+
+    * By a fingerprint:
+
+       "1234343434343434C434343434343434"
+       "123434343434343C3434343434343734349A3434"
+       "0E12343434343434343434EAB3484343434343434"
+
+      The first one is MD5 the others are ripemd160 or sha1.
+
+    * By an exact string (not yet implemented):
+
+       "=Heinrich Heine <heinrichh@uni-duesseldorf.de>"
+
+    * By an email address:
+
+       "<heinrichh@uni-duesseldorf.de>"
+
+      This can be used by a keyserver instead of a substring to
+      find this key faster.
+
+    * By the Local ID (from the trustdb):
+
+       "#34"
+
+      This can be used by a MUA to specify an exact key after selecting
+      a key from GNUPG (by the use of a special option or an extra utility)
+
+
+    * Or by the usual substring:
+
+       "Heine"
+       "*Heine"
+
+      The '*' indicates substring search explicitly.
+
+
+
+
+    Batch mode
+    ----------
+    If you use the option "--batch", GNUPG runs in non-interactive mode and
+    never prompts for input data.  This does not even allow entering the
+    passphrase; until we have a better solution (something like ssh-agent),
+    you can use the option "--passhrase-fd n", which works like PGPs
+    PGPPASSFD.
+
+    Batch mode also causes GNUPG to terminate as soon as a BAD signature is
+    detected.
+
+
+    Exit status
+    -----------
+    GNUPG returns with an exit status of 1 if in batch mode and a bad signature
+    has been detected or 2 or higher for all other errors.  You should parse
+    stderr or the output of the fd specified with --status-fd to get detailed
+    information about the errors.
+
+
+    Esoteric commands
+    -----------------
+
+       gpg --list-packets datafile
+
+    Use this to list the contents of a data file. If the file is encrypted
+    you are asked for the passphrase, so that GNUPG is able to look at the
+    inner structure of a encrypted packet.
+
+       gpgm --list-trustdb
+
+    List the contents of the trustdb in a human readable format
+
+       gpgm --list-trustdb  <usernames>
+
+    List the tree of certificates for the given usernames
+
+       gpgm --list-trust-path  depth  username
+
+    List the possible trust paths for the given username, up to the specified
+    depth.  If depth is negative, duplicate introducers are not listed,
+    because those would increase the trust probability only minimally.
+    (you must use the special option "--" to stop option parsing when
+     using a negative number). This option may create new entries in the
+    trustdb.
+
+       gpgm --print-mds  filenames
+
+    List all available message digest values for the fiven filenames
+
+       gpgm --gen-prime n
+
+    Generate and print a simple prime number of size n
+
+       gpgm --gen-prime n q
+
+    Generate a prime number suitable for ElGamal signatures of size n with
+    a q as largest prime factor of n-1.
+
+       gpgm --gen-prime n q 1
+
+    Ditto, but calculate a generator too.
+
+
+    For more options/commands see the file g10/OPTIONS, or use "gpg --help"
+
+
+    Debug Flags
+    -----------
+    Use the option "--debug n" to output debug information. This option
+    can be used multiple times, all values are ORed; n maybe prefixed with
+    0x to use hex-values.
+
+        value  used for
+        -----  ----------------------------------------------
+         1     packet reading/writing
+         2     MPI details
+         4     ciphers and primes (may reveal sensitive data)
+         8     iobuf filter functions
+         16    iobuf stuff
+         32    memory allocation stuff
+         64    caching
+         128   show memory statistics at exit
+         256   trust verification stuff
 
-    The default algorithms used by G10 are ElGamal for public-key
-    encryption and signing; Blowfish with a 160 bit key for protecting
-    the secret-key components, conventional and session encryption;
-    RIPE MD-160 to create message digest.  DSA, SHA-1 and CAST are
-    also implemented, but not used on default. I decided not
-    to use DSA as default signing algorithm, cecause it allows only for
-    1024 bit keys and this may be not enough in a couple of years.
 
-    Key generation takes a long time and should be improved!
+    Other Notes
+    -----------
+    This is work in progress, so you may find duplicated code fragments,
+    ugly data structures, weird usage of filenames and other things.
+    I will run "indent" over the source when making a real distribution,
+    but for now I stick to my own formatting rules.
 
+    The primary FTP site is "ftp://ftp.guug.de/pub/gcrypt/"
+    The primary WWW page is "http://www.d.shuttle.de/isil/crypt/gnupg.html"
 
+    If you like, send your keys to <gnupg-keys@isil.d.shuttle.de>; use
+    "gpg --export --armor | mail gnupg-keys@isil.d.shuttle.de" to do this.
 
+    Please direct bug reports to <gnupg-bugs@isil.d.shuttle.de> or better
+    post them to the mailing list <g10@net.lut.ac.uk>.