22d1ad0133c4aa74cd9cdb212b1bc6e262e82430
[gnupg.git] / README
1
2                     GnuPG - The GNU Privacy Guard
3                    -------------------------------
4                             Version 1.3.6
5
6             Copyright 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003,
7                  2004 Free Software Foundation, Inc.
8
9     This file is free software; as a special exception the author
10     gives unlimited permission to copy and/or distribute it, with or
11     without modifications, as long as this notice is preserved.
12
13     This file is distributed in the hope that it will be useful, but
14     WITHOUT ANY WARRANTY, to the extent permitted by law; without even
15     the implied warranty of MERCHANTABILITY or FITNESS FOR A
16     PARTICULAR PURPOSE.
17
18
19     Intro
20     -----
21
22     GnuPG is GNU's tool for secure communication and data storage.
23     It can be used to encrypt data and to create digital signatures.
24     It includes an advanced key management facility and is compliant
25     with the proposed OpenPGP Internet standard as described in RFC2440.
26
27     GnuPG works best on GNU/Linux or *BSD systems.  Most other Unices
28     are also supported but are not as well tested as the Free Unices.
29     See http://www.gnupg.org/download/supported_systems.html for a
30     list of systems which are known to work.
31
32     See the file COPYING for copyright and warranty information.
33
34     Because GnuPG does not use use any patented algorithms it is not
35     by default fully compatible with PGP 2.x, which uses the patented
36     IDEA algorithm.  See http://www.gnupg.org/why-not-idea.html for
37     more information on this subject, including what to do if you are
38     legally entitled to use IDEA.
39
40     The default public key algorithms are DSA and Elgamal, but RSA is
41     also supported.  Symmetric algorithms available are AES (with 128,
42     192, and 256 bit keys), 3DES, Blowfish, CAST5 and Twofish.  Digest
43     algorithms available are MD5, RIPEMD/160, SHA-1, SHA-256, SHA-384,
44     and SHA-512.  Compression algorithms available are ZIP, ZLIB, and
45     BZIP2 (with libbz2 installed).
46
47
48     Installation
49     ------------
50     Please read the file INSTALL and the sections in this file
51     related to the installation.  Here is a quick summary:
52
53     1) Check that you have unmodified sources.  See below on how to do
54        this.  Don't skip it - this is an important step!
55
56     2) Unpack the tarball.  With GNU tar you can do it this way:
57        "tar xzvf gnupg-x.y.z.tar.gz"
58
59     3) "cd gnupg-x.y.z"
60
61     4) "./configure"
62
63     5) "make"
64
65     6) "make install"
66
67     7) You end up with a "gpg" binary in /usr/local/bin.
68
69     8) To avoid swapping out of sensitive data, you can install "gpg"
70        setuid root.  If you don't do so, you may want to add the
71        option "no-secmem-warning" to ~/.gnupg/gpg.conf
72
73
74     How to Verify the Source
75     ------------------------
76     In order to check that the version of GnuPG which you are going to
77     install is an original and unmodified one, you can do it in one of
78     the following ways:
79
80     a) If you already have a trusted Version of GnuPG installed, you
81        can simply check the supplied signature:
82
83         $ gpg --verify gnupg-x.y.z.tar.gz.asc
84
85        This checks that the detached signature gnupg-x.y.z.tar.gz.asc
86        is indeed a a signature of gnupg-x.y.z.tar.gz.  The key used to
87        create this signature is:
88
89        "pub  1024D/57548DCD 1998-07-07 Werner Koch (gnupg sig) <dd9jn@gnu.org>"
90
91        If you do not have this key, you can get it from the source in
92        the file doc/samplekeys.asc (use "gpg --import  doc/samplekeys.asc"
93        to add it to the keyring) or from any keyserver.  You have to
94        make sure that this is really the key and not a faked one. You
95        can do this by comparing the output of:
96
97                 $ gpg --fingerprint 0x57548DCD
98
99        with the fingerprint published elsewhere.
100
101        Please note, that you have to use an old version of GnuPG to
102        do all this stuff.  *Never* use the version which you are going
103        to check!
104
105
106     b) If you don't have any of the above programs, you have to verify
107        the MD5 checksum:
108
109         $ md5sum gnupg-x.y.z.tar.gz
110
111        This should yield an output _similar_ to this:
112
113         fd9351b26b3189c1d577f0970f9dcadc  gnupg-x.y.z.tar.gz
114
115        Now check that this checksum is _exactly_ the same as the one
116        published via the announcement list and probably via Usenet.
117
118
119     Documentation
120     -------------
121
122     The manual will be distributed separately under the name "gph".
123     An online version of the latest manual draft is available at the
124     GnuPG web pages:
125
126         http://www.gnupg.org/documentation/
127
128     A list of frequently asked questions is available in the GnuPG
129     distribution in the file doc/FAQ and online as:
130
131         http://www.gnupg.org/documentation/faqs.html
132
133     A couple of HOWTO documents are available online; for a listing see:
134
135         http://www.gnupg.org/documentation/howtos.html
136
137     A man page with a description of all commands and options gets installed
138     along with the program. 
139
140
141     Introduction
142     ------------
143     Here is a brief overview on how to use GnuPG - it is strongly suggested
144     that you read the manual and other information about the use of
145     cryptography.  GnuPG is only a tool, secure usage requires that
146     YOU KNOW WHAT YOU ARE DOING.
147
148     The first time you run gpg, it will create a .gnupg directory in
149     your home directory and populate it with a default configuration
150     file.  Once this is done, you may create a new key, or if you
151     already have keyrings from PGP, you can import them into GnuPG
152     with:
153
154         gpg --import path/to/pgp/keyring/pubring.pkr
155     and
156         gpg --import path/to/pgp/keyring/secring.skr
157
158     The normal way to create a key is
159
160         gpg --gen-key
161
162     This asks some questions and then starts key generation. To create
163     good random numbers for the key parameters, GnuPG needs to gather
164     enough noise (entropy) from your system.  If you see no progress
165     during key generation you should start some other activities such
166     as moving the mouse or hitting the CTRL and SHIFT keys.
167
168     Generate a key ONLY on a machine where you have direct physical
169     access - don't do it over the network or on a machine also used
170     by others, especially if you have no access to the root account.
171
172     When you are asked for a passphrase use a good one which you can
173     easily remember.  Don't make the passphrase too long because you
174     have to type it for every decryption or signing; but, - AND THIS
175     IS VERY IMPORTANT - use a good one that is not easily to guess
176     because the security of the whole system relies on your secret key
177     and the passphrase that protects it when someone gains access to
178     your secret keyring.  One good way to select a passphrase is to
179     figure out a short nonsense sentence which makes some sense for
180     you and modify it by inserting extra spaces, non-letters and
181     changing the case of some characters - this is really easy to
182     remember especially if you associate some pictures with it.
183
184     Next, you should create a revocation certificate in case someone
185     gets knowledge of your secret key or you forgot your passphrase
186
187         gpg --gen-revoke your_user_id
188
189     Run this command and store the revocation certificate away.  The output
190     is always ASCII armored, so that you can print it and (hopefully
191     never) re-create it if your electronic media fails.
192
193     Now you can use your key to create digital signatures
194
195         gpg -s file
196
197     This creates a file "file.gpg" which is compressed and has a
198     signature attached.
199
200         gpg -sa file
201
202     Same as above, but creates a file "file.asc" which is ASCII armored
203     and and ready for sending by mail.  It is better to use your
204     mailers features to create signatures (The mailer uses GnuPG to do
205     this) because the mailer has the ability to MIME encode such
206     signatures - but this is not a security issue.
207
208         gpg -s -o out file
209
210     Creates a signature of "file", but writes the output to the file
211     "out".
212
213     Everyone who knows your public key (you can and should publish
214     your key by putting it on a key server, a web page or in your .plan
215     file) is now able to check whether you really signed this text
216
217         gpg --verify file
218
219     GnuPG now checks whether the signature is valid and prints an
220     appropriate message.  If the signature is good, you know at least
221     that the person (or machine) has access to the secret key which
222     corresponds to the published public key.
223
224     If you run gpg without an option it will verify the signature and
225     create a new file that is identical to the original.  gpg can also
226     run as a filter, so that you can pipe data to verify trough it
227
228         cat signed-file | gpg | wc -l
229
230     which will check the signature of signed-file and then display the
231     number of lines in the original file.
232
233     To send a message encrypted to someone you can use
234
235         gpg -e -r heine file
236
237     This encrypts "file" with the public key of the user "heine" and
238     writes it to "file.gpg"
239
240         echo "hello" | gpg -ea -r heine | mail heine
241
242     Ditto, but encrypts "hello\n" and mails it as ASCII armored message
243     to the user with the mail address heine.
244
245         gpg -se -r heine file
246
247     This encrypts "file" with the public key of "heine" and writes it
248     to "file.gpg" after signing it with your user id.
249
250         gpg -se -r heine -u Suttner file
251
252     Ditto, but sign the file with your alternative user id "Suttner"
253
254
255     GnuPG has some options to help you publish public keys.  This is
256     called "exporting" a key, thus
257
258         gpg --export >all-my-keys
259
260     exports all the keys in the keyring and writes them (in a binary
261     format) to "all-my-keys".  You may then mail "all-my-keys" as an
262     MIME attachment to someone else or put it on an FTP server. To
263     export only some user IDs, you give them as arguments on the command
264     line.
265
266     To mail a public key or put it on a web page you have to create
267     the key in ASCII armored format
268
269         gpg --export --armor | mail panther@tiger.int
270
271     This will send all your public keys to your friend panther.
272
273     If you have received a key from someone else you can put it
274     into your public keyring.  This is called "importing"
275
276         gpg --import [filenames]
277
278     New keys are appended to your keyring and already existing
279     keys are updated. Note that GnuPG does not import keys that
280     are not self-signed.
281
282     Because anyone can claim that a public key belongs to her
283     we must have some way to check that a public key really belongs
284     to the owner.  This can be achieved by comparing the key during
285     a phone call.  Sure, it is not very easy to compare a binary file
286     by reading the complete hex dump of the file - GnuPG (and nearly
287     every other program used for management of cryptographic keys)
288     provides other solutions.
289
290         gpg --fingerprint <username>
291
292     prints the so called "fingerprint" of the given username which
293     is a sequence of hex bytes (which you may have noticed in mail
294     sigs or on business cards) that uniquely identifies the public
295     key - different keys will always have different fingerprints.
296     It is easy to compare fingerprints by phone and I suggest
297     that you print your fingerprint on the back of your business
298     card.  To see the fingerprints of the secondary keys, you can
299     give the command twice; but this is normally not needed.
300
301     If you don't know the owner of the public key you are in trouble.
302     Suppose however that friend of yours knows someone who knows someone
303     who has met the owner of the public key at some computer conference.
304     Suppose that all the people between you and the public key holder
305     may now act as introducers to you.  Introducers signing keys thereby
306     certify that they know the owner of the keys they sign.  If you then
307     trust all the introducers to have correctly signed other keys, you
308     can be be sure that the other key really belongs to the one who
309     claims to own it..
310
311     There are 2 steps to validate a key:
312         1. First check that there is a complete chain
313            of signed keys from the public key you want to use
314            and your key and verify each signature.
315         2. Make sure that you have full trust in the certificates
316            of all the introduces between the public key holder and
317            you.
318     Step 2 is the more complicated part because there is no easy way
319     for a computer to decide who is trustworthy and who is not.  GnuPG
320     leaves this decision to you and will ask you for a trust value
321     (here also referenced as the owner-trust of a key) for every key
322     needed to check the chain of certificates.  You may choose from:
323       a) "I don't know" - then it is not possible to use any
324          of the chains of certificates, in which this key is used
325          as an introducer, to validate the target key.  Use this if
326          you don't know the introducer.
327       b) "I do not trust" - Use this if you know that the introducer
328          does not do a good job in certifying other keys.  The effect
329          is the same as with a) but for a) you may later want to
330          change the value because you got new information about this
331          introducer.
332       c) "I trust marginally" - Use this if you assume that the
333          introducer knows what he is doing.  Together with some
334          other marginally trusted keys, GnuPG validates the target
335          key then as good.
336       d) "I fully trust" - Use this if you really know that this
337          introducer does a good job when certifying other keys.
338          If all the introducer are of this trust value, GnuPG
339          normally needs only one chain of signatures to validate
340          a target key okay. (But this may be adjusted with the help
341          of some options).
342     This information is confidential because it gives your personal
343     opinion on the trustworthiness of someone else.  Therefore this data
344     is not stored in the keyring but in the "trustdb"
345     (~/.gnupg/trustdb.gpg).  Do not assign a high trust value just
346     because the introducer is a friend of yours - decide how well she
347     understands the implications of key signatures and you may want to
348     tell her more about public key cryptography so you can later change
349     the trust value you assigned.
350
351     Okay, here is how GnuPG helps you with key management.  Most stuff
352     is done with the --edit-key command
353
354         gpg --edit-key <keyid or username>
355
356     GnuPG displays some information about the key and then prompts
357     for a command (enter "help" to see a list of commands and see
358     the man page for a more detailed explanation).  To sign a key
359     you select the user ID you want to sign by entering the number
360     that is displayed in the leftmost column (or do nothing if the
361     key has only one user ID) and then enter the command "sign" and
362     follow all the prompts.  When you are ready, give the command
363     "save" (or use "quit" to cancel your actions).
364
365     If you want to sign the key with another of your user IDs, you
366     must give an "-u" option on the command line together with the
367     "--edit-key".
368
369     Normally you want to sign only one user ID because GnuPG
370     uses only one and this keeps the public key certificate
371     small.  Because such key signatures are very important you
372     should make sure that the signatories of your key sign a user ID
373     which is very likely to stay for a long time - choose one with an
374     email address you have full control of or do not enter an email
375     address at all.  In future GnuPG will have a way to tell which
376     user ID is the one with an email address you prefer - because
377     you have no signatures on this email address it is easy to change
378     this address.  Remember, your signatories sign your public key (the
379     primary one) together with one of your user IDs - so it is not possible
380     to change the user ID later without voiding all the signatures.
381
382     Tip: If you hear about a key signing party on a computer conference
383     join it because this is a very convenient way to get your key
384     certified (But remember that signatures have nothing to to with the
385     trust you assign to a key).
386
387
388     8 Ways to Specify a User ID
389     --------------------------
390     There are several ways to specify a user ID, here are some examples.
391
392     * Only by the short keyid (prepend a zero if it begins with A..F):
393
394         "234567C4"
395         "0F34E556E"
396         "01347A56A"
397         "0xAB123456
398
399     * By a complete keyid:
400
401         "234AABBCC34567C4"
402         "0F323456784E56EAB"
403         "01AB3FED1347A5612"
404         "0x234AABBCC34567C4"
405
406     * By a fingerprint:
407
408         "1234343434343434C434343434343434"
409         "123434343434343C3434343434343734349A3434"
410         "0E12343434343434343434EAB3484343434343434"
411
412       The first one is a short fingerprint for PGP 2.x style keys.
413       The others are long fingerprints for OpenPGP keys.
414
415     * By an exact string:
416
417         "=Heinrich Heine <heinrichh@uni-duesseldorf.de>"
418
419     * By an email address:
420
421         "<heinrichh@uni-duesseldorf.de>"
422
423     * By word match
424
425         "+Heinrich Heine duesseldorf"
426
427       All words must match exactly (not case sensitive) and appear in
428       any order in the user ID.  Words are any sequences of letters,
429       digits, the underscore and characters with bit 7 set.
430
431     * Or by the usual substring:
432
433         "Heine"
434         "*Heine"
435
436       The '*' indicates substring search explicitly.
437
438
439     Batch mode
440     ----------
441     If you use the option "--batch", GnuPG runs in non-interactive mode and
442     never prompts for input data.  This does not even allow entering the
443     passphrase.  Until we have a better solution (something like ssh-agent),
444     you can use the option "--passphrase-fd n", which works like PGP's
445     PGPPASSFD.
446
447     Batch mode also causes GnuPG to terminate as soon as a BAD signature is
448     detected.
449
450
451     Exit status
452     -----------
453     GnuPG returns with an exit status of 1 if in batch mode and a bad signature
454     has been detected or 2 or higher for all other errors.  You should parse
455     stderr or, better, the output of the fd specified with --status-fd to get
456     detailed information about the errors.
457
458
459     Configure options 
460     -----------------
461     Here is a list of configure options which are sometime useful 
462     for installation.
463
464     --enable-static-rnd=<name> 
465                      Force the use of the random byte gathering
466                      module <name>.  Default is either to use /dev/random
467                      or the auto mode.  Value for name:
468                        egd - Use the module which accesses the
469                              Entropy Gathering Daemon. See the webpages
470                              for more information about it.
471                       unix - Use the standard Unix module which does not
472                              have a very good performance.
473                      linux - Use the module which accesses /dev/random.
474                              This is the first choice and the default one
475                              for GNU/Linux or *BSD.
476                       auto - Compile linux, egd and unix in and 
477                              automagically select at runtime.
478   
479     --with-egd-socket=<name>
480                      This is only used when EGD is used as random
481                      gatherer. GnuPG uses by default "~/.gnupg/entropy"
482                      as the socket to connect EGD.  Using this option the
483                      socket name can be changed.  You may use any filename
484                      here with 2 exceptions:  a filename starting with
485                      "~/" uses the socket in the home directory of the user
486                      and one starting with a "=" uses a socket in the
487                      GnuPG home directory which is "~/.gnupg" by default.
488    
489      --with-included-zlib
490                      Forces usage of the local zlib sources. Default is
491                      to use the (shared) library of the system.
492
493      --with-zlib=<DIR>
494                      Look for the system zlib in DIR.
495
496      --with-bzip2=<DIR>
497                      Look for the system libbz2 in DIR.
498
499      --without-bzip2
500                      Disable the BZIP2 compression algorithm.
501
502      --with-included-gettext
503                      Forces usage of the local gettext sources instead of
504                      the one provided by your system.
505
506      --disable-nls
507                      Disable NLS support (See the file ABOUT-NLS)
508
509      --enable-m-guard
510                      Enable the integrated malloc checking code. Please
511                      note that this feature does not work on all CPUs
512                      (e.g. SunOS 5.7 on UltraSparc-2) and might give
513                      you a bus error.
514
515      --disable-dynload 
516                     If you have problems with dynamic loading, this
517                     option disables all dynamic loading stuff.  Note
518                     that the use of dynamic linking is very limited.
519
520      --disable-asm
521                     Do not use assembler modules.  It is not possible 
522                     to use this on some CPU types.
523                     
524      --disable-exec
525                     Disable all remote program execution.  This
526                     disables photo ID viewing as well as all keyserver
527                     access.
528
529      --disable-photo-viewers
530                     Disable only photo ID viewing.
531
532      --disable-keyserver-helpers
533                     Disable only keyserver helpers.
534
535      --disable-keyserver-path
536                     Disables the user's ability to use the exec-path
537                     feature to add additional search directories when
538                     executing a keyserver helper.
539
540      --with-photo-viewer=FIXED_VIEWER
541                     Force the photo viewer to be FIXED_VIEWER and
542                     disable any ability for the user to change it in
543                     their options file.
544
545      --disable-rsa
546                     Removes support for the RSA public key algorithm.
547                     This can give a smaller gpg binary for places
548                     where space is tight.
549
550      --disable-idea
551      --disable-cast5
552      --disable-blowfish
553      --disable-aes
554      --disable-twofish
555      --disable-sha256
556      --disable-sha512
557                     Removes support for the selected symmetric
558                     algorithm.  This can give a smaller gpg binary for
559                     places where space is tight.
560
561                     **** Note that if there are existing keys that
562                     have one of these algorithms as a preference,
563                     messages may be received that use one of these
564                     algorithms and you will not be able to decrypt the
565                     message! ****
566
567                     The public key preference list can be updated to
568                     match the list of available algorithms by using
569                     "gpg --edit-key (thekey)", and running the
570                     "updpref" command.
571
572      --enable-minimal
573                     Build the smallest gpg possible (disables all
574                     optional algorithms, disables keyserver access,
575                     and disables photo IDs).  Specifically, this means
576                     --disable-rsa --disable-idea, --disable-cast5,
577                     --disable-blowfish, --disable-aes,
578                     --disable-twofish, --disable-sha256,
579                     --disable-sha512, --without-bzip2, and
580                     --disable-exec.  Configure command lines are read
581                     from left to right, so if you want to have an
582                     "almost minimal" configuration, you can do (for
583                     example) "--enable-minimal --enable-rsa" to have
584                     RSA added to the minimal build.
585
586      --enable-key-cache=SIZE
587                     Set the internal key and UID cache size.  This has
588                     a significant impact on performance with large
589                     keyrings.  The default is 4096, but for use on
590                     platforms where memory is an issue, it can be set
591                     as low as 5.
592
593
594     Installation Problems
595     ---------------------
596     If you get unresolved externals "gettext" you should run configure
597     again with the option "--with-included-gettext"; this is version
598     0.12.1 which is available at ftp.gnu.org.
599
600     If you have other compile problems, try the configure options
601     "--with-included-zlib" or "--disable-nls" (See ABOUT-NLS) or
602     --disable-dynload.
603
604     We can't check all assembler files, so if you have problems
605     assembling them (or the program crashes) use --disable-asm with
606     ./configure.  If you opt to delete individual replacement files in
607     hopes of using the remaining ones, be aware that the configure
608     scripts may consider several subdirectories to get all available
609     assembler files; be sure to delete the correct ones. The assembler
610     replacements are in C and in mpi/generic; never delete
611     udiv-qrnnd.S in any CPU directory, because there may be no C
612     substitute.  Don't forget to delete "config.cache" and run
613     "./config.status --recheck".  We have also heard reports of
614     problems when using versions of gcc earlier than 2.96 along with a
615     non-GNU assembler (as).  If this applies to your platform, you can
616     either upgrade gcc to a more recent version, or use the GNU
617     assembler.
618
619     Some make tools are broken - the best solution is to use GNU's
620     make.  Try gmake or grab the sources from a GNU archive and
621     install them.
622
623     On some OSF systems you may get unresolved externals.  This is a
624     libtool problem and the workaround is to manually remove all the
625     "-lc -lz" but the last one from the linker line and execute them
626     manually.
627
628     On some architectures you see warnings like:
629       longlong.h:175: warning: function declaration isn't a prototype
630     or
631       http.c:647: warning: cast increases required alignment of target type
632     This doesn't matter and we know about it (actually it is due to
633     some warning options which we have enabled for gcc)
634
635
636     Specific problems on some machines
637     ----------------------------------
638
639     * Apple Darwin 6.1:
640
641         ./configure --with-libiconv-prefix=/sw
642
643     * Compaq C V6.2 for alpha:
644
645         You may want to use the option "-msg-disable ptrmismatch1"
646         to get rid of the sign/unsigned char mismatch warnings.
647
648     * IBM RS/6000 running AIX:
649
650         Due to a change in gcc (since version 2.8) the MPI stuff may
651         not build. In this case try to run configure using:
652             CFLAGS="-g -O2 -mcpu=powerpc" ./configure
653
654     * SVR4.2 (ESIX V4.2 cc)
655
656         Due to problems with the ESIX as, you probably want to do
657             CFLAGS="-O -K pentium" ./configure --disable-asm
658
659     * SunOS 4.1.4
660
661          ./configure ac_cv_sys_symbol_underscore=yes
662
663     The Random Device
664     -----------------
665
666     Random devices are available in Linux, FreeBSD and OpenBSD.
667     Operating systems without a random devices must use another
668     entropy collector. 
669
670     This collector works by running a lot of commands that yield more
671     or less unpredictable output and feds this as entropy into the
672     random generator - It should work reliably but you should check
673     whether it produces good output for your version of Unix. There
674     are some debug options to help you (see cipher/rndunix.c).
675
676
677     Creating an RPM package
678     -----------------------
679     The file scripts/gnupg.spec is used to build a RPM package (both
680     binary and src):
681       1. copy the spec file into /usr/src/redhat/SPECS
682       2. copy the tar file into /usr/src/redhat/SOURCES
683       3. type: rpm -ba SPECS/gnupg.spec
684
685     Or use the -t (--tarbuild) option of rpm:
686       1. rpm -ta gnupg-x.x.x.tar.gz
687
688     The binary rpm file can now be found in /usr/src/redhat/RPMS, source
689     rpm in /usr/src/redhat/SRPMS
690
691
692     How to Get More Information
693     ---------------------------
694
695     The primary WWW page is "http://www.gnupg.org"
696     The primary FTP site is "ftp://ftp.gnupg.org/gcrypt/"
697
698     See http://www.gnupg.org/download/mirrors.html for a list of
699     mirrors and use them if possible.  You may also find GnuPG
700     mirrored on some of the regular GNU mirrors.
701
702     We have some mailing lists dedicated to GnuPG:
703
704         gnupg-announce@gnupg.org    For important announcements like
705                                     new versions and such stuff.
706                                     This is a moderated list and has
707                                     very low traffic.
708
709         gnupg-users@gnupg.org       For general user discussion and
710                                     help.
711
712         gnupg-devel@gnupg.org       GnuPG developers main forum.
713
714     You subscribe to one of the list by sending mail with a subject
715     of "subscribe" to x-request@gnupg.org, where x is the name of the
716     mailing list (gnupg-announce, gnupg-users, etc.).  An archive of
717     the mailing lists are available at
718     http://www.gnupg.org/documentation/mailing-lists.html
719
720     Please direct bug reports to http://bugs.gnupg.org or post
721     them direct to the mailing list <gnupg-devel@gnupg.org>.
722
723     Please direct questions about GnuPG to the users mailing list or
724     one of the pgp newsgroups; please do not direct questions to one
725     of the authors directly as we are busy working on improvements
726     and bug fixes.  Both mailing lists are watched by the authors
727     and we try to answer questions when time allows us to do so.
728
729     Commercial grade support for GnuPG is available; please see
730     the GNU service directory or search other resources.