agent: Avoid appending a '\0' byte to the response of READKEY
[gnupg.git] / common / iobuf.h
1 /* iobuf.h - I/O buffer
2  * Copyright (C) 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2003,
3  *               2010 Free Software Foundation, Inc.
4  *
5  * This file is part of GnuPG.
6  *
7  * This file is free software; you can redistribute it and/or modify
8  * it under the terms of either
9  *
10  *   - the GNU Lesser General Public License as published by the Free
11  *     Software Foundation; either version 3 of the License, or (at
12  *     your option) any later version.
13  *
14  * or
15  *
16  *   - the GNU General Public License as published by the Free
17  *     Software Foundation; either version 2 of the License, or (at
18  *     your option) any later version.
19  *
20  * or both in parallel, as here.
21  *
22  * This file is distributed in the hope that it will be useful,
23  * but WITHOUT ANY WARRANTY; without even the implied warranty of
24  * MERCHANTABILITY or FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE.  See the
25  * GNU General Public License for more details.
26  *
27  * You should have received a copy of the GNU General Public License
28  * along with this program; if not, see <https://www.gnu.org/licenses/>.
29  */
30
31 #ifndef GNUPG_COMMON_IOBUF_H
32 #define GNUPG_COMMON_IOBUF_H
33
34 /* An iobuf is basically a filter in a pipeline.
35
36    Consider the following command, which consists of three filters
37    that are chained together:
38
39      $ cat file | base64 --decode | gunzip
40
41    The first filter reads the file from the file system and sends that
42    data to the second filter.  The second filter decodes
43    base64-encoded data and sends the data to the third and last
44    filter.  The last filter decompresses the data and the result is
45    displayed on the terminal.  The iobuf system works in the same way
46    where each iobuf is a filter and the individual iobufs can be
47    chained together.
48
49    There are number of predefined filters.  iobuf_open(), for
50    instance, creates a filter that reads from a specified file.  And,
51    iobuf_temp_with_content() creates a filter that returns some
52    specified contents.  There are also filters for writing content.
53    iobuf_openrw opens a file for writing.  iobuf_temp creates a filter
54    that writes data to a fixed-sized buffer.
55
56    To chain filters together, you use the iobuf_push_filter()
57    function.  The filters are chained together using the chain field
58    in the iobuf_t.
59
60    A pipeline can only be used for reading (IOBUF_INPUT) or for
61    writing (IOBUF_OUTPUT / IOBUF_OUTPUT_TEMP).  When reading, data
62    flows from the last filter towards the first.  That is, the user
63    calls iobuf_read(), the module reads from the first filter, which
64    gets its input from the second filter, etc.  When writing, data
65    flows from the first filter towards the last.  In this case, when
66    the user calls iobuf_write(), the data is written to the first
67    filter, which writes the transformed data to the second filter,
68    etc.
69
70    An iobuf_t contains some state about the filter.  For instance, it
71    indicates if the filter has already returned EOF (filter_eof) and
72    the next filter in the pipeline, if any (chain).  It also contains
73    a function pointer, filter.  This is a generic function.  It is
74    called when input is needed or output is available.  In this case
75    it is passed a pointer to some filter-specific persistent state
76    (filter_ov), the actual operation, the next filter in the chain, if
77    any, and a buffer that either contains the contents to write, if
78    the pipeline is setup to write data, or is the place to store data,
79    if the pipeline is setup to read data.
80
81
82    Unlike a Unix pipeline, an IOBUF pipeline can return EOF multiple
83    times.  This is similar to the following:
84
85      { cat file1; cat file2; } | grep foo
86
87    However, instead of grep seeing a single stream, grep would see
88    each byte stream followed by an EOF marker.  (When a filter returns
89    EOF, the EOF is returned to the user exactly once and then the
90    filter is removed from the pipeline.)  */
91
92 /* For estream_t.  */
93 #include <gpg-error.h>
94
95 #include "../common/types.h"
96 #include "../common/sysutils.h"
97
98 #define DBG_IOBUF   iobuf_debug_mode
99
100 /* Filter control modes.  */
101 enum
102   {
103     IOBUFCTRL_INIT      = 1,
104     IOBUFCTRL_FREE      = 2,
105     IOBUFCTRL_UNDERFLOW = 3,
106     IOBUFCTRL_FLUSH     = 4,
107     IOBUFCTRL_DESC      = 5,
108     IOBUFCTRL_CANCEL    = 6,
109     IOBUFCTRL_USER      = 16
110   };
111
112
113 /* Command codes for iobuf_ioctl.  */
114 typedef enum
115   {
116     IOBUF_IOCTL_KEEP_OPEN        = 1, /* Uses intval.  */
117     IOBUF_IOCTL_INVALIDATE_CACHE = 2, /* Uses ptrval.  */
118     IOBUF_IOCTL_NO_CACHE         = 3, /* Uses intval.  */
119     IOBUF_IOCTL_FSYNC            = 4  /* Uses ptrval.  */
120   } iobuf_ioctl_t;
121
122 enum iobuf_use
123   {
124     /* Pipeline is in input mode.  The data flows from the end to the
125        beginning.  That is, when reading from the pipeline, the first
126        filter gets its input from the second filter, etc.  */
127     IOBUF_INPUT,
128     /* Pipeline is in input mode.  The last filter in the pipeline is
129        a temporary buffer from which the data is "read".  */
130     IOBUF_INPUT_TEMP,
131     /* Pipeline is in output mode.  The data flows from the beginning
132        to the end.  That is, when writing to the pipeline, the user
133        writes to the first filter, which transforms the data and sends
134        it to the second filter, etc.  */
135     IOBUF_OUTPUT,
136     /* Pipeline is in output mode.  The last filter in the pipeline is
137        a temporary buffer that grows as necessary.  */
138     IOBUF_OUTPUT_TEMP
139   };
140
141
142 typedef struct iobuf_struct *iobuf_t;
143 typedef struct iobuf_struct *IOBUF;  /* Compatibility with gpg 1.4. */
144
145 /* fixme: we should hide most of this stuff */
146 struct iobuf_struct
147 {
148   /* The type of filter.  Either IOBUF_INPUT, IOBUF_OUTPUT or
149      IOBUF_OUTPUT_TEMP.  */
150   enum iobuf_use use;
151
152   /* nlimit can be changed using iobuf_set_limit.  If non-zero, it is
153      the number of additional bytes that can be read from the filter
154      before EOF is forcefully returned.  */
155   off_t nlimit;
156   /* nbytes if the number of bytes that have been read (using
157      iobuf_get / iobuf_readbyte / iobuf_read) since the last call to
158      iobuf_set_limit.  */
159   off_t nbytes;
160
161   /* The number of bytes read prior to the last call to
162      iobuf_set_limit.  Thus, the total bytes read (i.e., the position
163      of stream) is ntotal + nbytes. */
164   off_t ntotal;
165
166   /* Whether we need to read from the filter one byte at a time or
167      whether we can do bulk reads.  We need to read one byte at a time
168      if a limit (set via iobuf_set_limit) is active.  */
169   int nofast;
170
171   /* A buffer for unread/unwritten data.
172
173      For an output pipeline (IOBUF_OUTPUT), this is the data that has
174      not yet been written to the filter.  Consider a simple pipeline
175      consisting of a single stage, which writes to a file.  When you
176      write to the pipeline (iobuf_writebyte or iobuf_write), the data
177      is first stored in this buffer.  Only when the buffer is full or
178      you call iobuf_flush() is FILTER actually called and the data
179      written to the file.
180
181      For an input pipeline (IOBUF_INPUT), this is the data that has
182      been read from this filter, but not yet been read from the
183      preceding filter (or the user, if this filter is the head of the
184      pipeline).  Again, consider a simple pipeline consisting of a
185      single stage.  This stage reads from a file.  If you read a
186      single byte (iobuf_get) and the buffer is empty, then FILTER is
187      called to fill the buffer.  In this case, a single byte is not
188      requested, but the whole buffer is filled (if possible).  */
189   struct
190   {
191     /* Size of the buffer.  */
192     size_t size;
193     /* Number of bytes at the beginning of the buffer that have
194        already been consumed.  (In other words: the index of the first
195        byte that hasn't been consumed.)  This is only non-zero for
196        input filters.  */
197     size_t start;
198     /* The number of bytes in the buffer including any bytes that have
199        been consumed.  */
200     size_t len;
201     /* The buffer itself.  */
202     byte *buf;
203   } d;
204
205   /* When FILTER is called to read some data, it may read some data
206      and then return EOF.  We can't return the EOF immediately.
207      Instead, we note that we observed the EOF and when the buffer is
208      finally empty, we return the EOF.  */
209   int filter_eof;
210   /* Like filter_eof, when FILTER is called to read some data, it may
211      read some data and then return an error.  We can't return the
212      error (in the form of an EOF) immediately.  Instead, we note that
213      we observed the error and when the buffer is finally empty, we
214      return the EOF.  */
215   int error;
216
217   /* The callback function to read data from the filter, etc.  See
218      iobuf_filter_push for details.  */
219   int (*filter) (void *opaque, int control,
220                  iobuf_t chain, byte * buf, size_t * len);
221   /* An opaque pointer that can be used for local filter state.  This
222      is passed as the first parameter to FILTER.  */
223   void *filter_ov;
224   /* Whether the iobuf code should free(filter_ov) when destroying the
225      filter.  */
226   int filter_ov_owner;
227
228   /* When using iobuf_open, iobuf_create, iobuf_openrw to open a file,
229      the file's name is saved here.  This is used to delete the file
230      when an output pipeline (IOBUF_OUPUT) is canceled
231      (iobuf_cancel).  */
232   char *real_fname;
233
234   /* The next filter in the pipeline.  */
235   iobuf_t chain;
236
237   /* This field is for debugging.  Each time a filter is allocated
238      (via iobuf_alloc()), a monotonically increasing counter is
239      incremented and this field is set to the new value.  This field
240      should only be accessed via the iobuf_io macro.  */
241   int no;
242
243   /* The number of filters in the pipeline following (not including)
244      this one.  When you call iobuf_push_filter or iobuf_push_filter2,
245      this value is used to check the length of the pipeline if the
246      pipeline already contains 65 stages then these functions fail.
247      This amount of nesting typically indicates corrupted data or an
248      active denial of service attack.  */
249   int subno;
250 };
251
252 #ifndef EXTERN_UNLESS_MAIN_MODULE
253 #if defined (__riscos__) && !defined (INCLUDED_BY_MAIN_MODULE)
254 #define EXTERN_UNLESS_MAIN_MODULE extern
255 #else
256 #define EXTERN_UNLESS_MAIN_MODULE
257 #endif
258 #endif
259 EXTERN_UNLESS_MAIN_MODULE int iobuf_debug_mode;
260
261
262 /* Returns whether the specified filename corresponds to a pipe.  In
263    particular, this function checks if FNAME is "-" and, if special
264    filenames are enabled (see check_special_filename), whether
265    FNAME is a special filename.  */
266 int  iobuf_is_pipe_filename (const char *fname);
267
268 /* Allocate a new filter.  This filter doesn't have a function
269    assigned to it.  Thus you need to manually set IOBUF->FILTER and
270    IOBUF->FILTER_OV, if required.  This function is intended to help
271    create a new primary source or primary sink, i.e., the last filter
272    in the pipeline.
273
274    USE is IOBUF_INPUT, IOBUF_INPUT_TEMP, IOBUF_OUTPUT or
275    IOBUF_OUTPUT_TEMP.
276
277    BUFSIZE is the desired internal buffer size (that is, the size of
278    the typical read / write request).  */
279 iobuf_t iobuf_alloc (int use, size_t bufsize);
280
281 /* Create an output filter that simply buffers data written to it.
282    This is useful for collecting data for later processing.  The
283    buffer can be written to in the usual way (iobuf_write, etc.).  The
284    data can later be extracted using iobuf_write_temp() or
285    iobuf_temp_to_buffer().  */
286 iobuf_t iobuf_temp (void);
287
288 /* Create an input filter that contains some data for reading.  */
289 iobuf_t iobuf_temp_with_content (const char *buffer, size_t length);
290
291 /* Create an input file filter that reads from a file.  If FNAME is
292    '-', reads from stdin.  If special filenames are enabled
293    (iobuf_enable_special_filenames), then interprets special
294    filenames.  */
295 iobuf_t iobuf_open (const char *fname);
296
297 /* Create an output file filter that writes to a file.  If FNAME is
298    NULL or '-', writes to stdout.  If special filenames are enabled
299    (iobuf_enable_special_filenames), then interprets special
300    filenames.  If FNAME is not NULL, '-' or a special filename, the
301    file is opened for writing.  If the file exists, it is truncated.
302    If MODE700 is TRUE, the file is created with mode 600.  Otherwise,
303    mode 666 is used.  */
304 iobuf_t iobuf_create (const char *fname, int mode700);
305
306 /* Create an output file filter that writes to a specified file.
307    Neither '-' nor special file names are recognized.  */
308 iobuf_t iobuf_openrw (const char *fname);
309
310 /* Create a file filter using an existing file descriptor.  If MODE
311    contains the letter 'w', creates an output filter.  Otherwise,
312    creates an input filter.  Note: MODE must reflect the file
313    descriptors actual mode!  When the filter is destroyed, the file
314    descriptor is closed.  */
315 iobuf_t iobuf_fdopen (int fd, const char *mode);
316
317 /* Like iobuf_fdopen, but doesn't close the file descriptor when the
318    filter is destroyed.  */
319 iobuf_t iobuf_fdopen_nc (int fd, const char *mode);
320
321 /* Create a filter using an existing estream.  If MODE contains the
322    letter 'w', creates an output filter.  Otherwise, creates an input
323    filter.  If KEEP_OPEN is TRUE, then the stream is not closed when
324    the filter is destroyed.  Otherwise, the stream is closed when the
325    filter is destroyed.  */
326 iobuf_t iobuf_esopen (estream_t estream, const char *mode, int keep_open);
327
328 /* Create a filter using an existing socket.  On Windows creates a
329    special socket filter.  On non-Windows systems simply, this simply
330    calls iobuf_fdopen.  */
331 iobuf_t iobuf_sockopen (int fd, const char *mode);
332
333 /* Set various options / perform different actions on a PIPELINE.  See
334    the IOBUF_IOCTL_* macros above.  */
335 int iobuf_ioctl (iobuf_t a, iobuf_ioctl_t cmd, int intval, void *ptrval);
336
337 /* Close a pipeline.  The filters in the pipeline are first flushed
338    using iobuf_flush, if they are output filters, and then
339    IOBUFCTRL_FREE is called on each filter.
340
341    If any filter returns a non-zero value in response to the
342    IOBUFCTRL_FREE, that first such non-zero value is returned.  Note:
343    processing is not aborted in this case.  If all filters are freed
344    successfully, 0 is returned.  */
345 int iobuf_close (iobuf_t iobuf);
346
347 /* Calls IOBUFCTRL_CANCEL on each filter in the pipeline.  Then calls
348    io_close() on the pipeline.  Finally, if the pipeline is an output
349    pipeline, deletes the file.  Returns the result of calling
350    iobuf_close on the pipeline.  */
351 int iobuf_cancel (iobuf_t iobuf);
352
353 /* Add a new filter to the front of a pipeline.  A is the head of the
354    pipeline.  F is the filter implementation.  OV is an opaque pointer
355    that is passed to F and is normally used to hold any internal
356    state, such as a file pointer.
357
358    Note: you may only maintain a reference to an iobuf_t as a
359    reference to the head of the pipeline.  That is, don't think about
360    setting a pointer in OV to point to the filter's iobuf_t.  This is
361    because when we add a new filter to a pipeline, we memcpy the state
362    in A into new buffer.  This has the advantage that there is no need
363    to update any references to the pipeline when a filter is added or
364    removed, but it also means that a filter's state moves around in
365    memory.
366
367    The behavior of the filter function is determined by the value of
368    the control parameter:
369
370      IOBUFCTRL_INIT: Called this value just before the filter is
371        linked into the pipeline. This can be used to initialize
372        internal data structures.
373
374      IOBUFCTRL_FREE: Called with this value just before the filter is
375        removed from the pipeline.  Normally used to release internal
376        data structures, close a file handle, etc.
377
378      IOBUFCTRL_UNDERFLOW: Called with this value to fill the passed
379        buffer with more data. *LEN is the size of the buffer.  Before
380        returning, it should be set to the number of bytes which were
381        written into the buffer.  The function must return 0 to
382        indicate success, -1 on EOF and a GPG_ERR_xxxxx code for any
383        error.
384
385        Note: this function may both return data and indicate an error
386        or EOF.  In this case, it simply writes the data to BUF, sets
387        *LEN and returns the appropriate return code.  The implication
388        is that if an error occurs and no data has yet been written, it
389        is essential that *LEN be set to 0!
390
391      IOBUFCTRL_FLUSH: Called with this value to write out any
392        collected data.  *LEN is the number of bytes in BUF that need
393        to be written out.  Returns 0 on success and a GPG_ERR_* code
394        otherwise.  *LEN must be set to the number of bytes that were
395        written out.
396
397      IOBUFCTRL_CANCEL: Called with this value when iobuf_cancel() is
398        called on the pipeline.
399
400      IOBUFCTRL_DESC: Called with this value to get a human-readable
401        description of the filter.  *LEN is the size of the buffer.
402        The description is filled into BUF, NUL-terminated.  Always
403        returns 0.
404   */
405 int iobuf_push_filter (iobuf_t a, int (*f) (void *opaque, int control,
406                                             iobuf_t chain, byte * buf,
407                                             size_t * len), void *ov);
408 /* This variant of iobuf_push_filter allows the called to indicate
409    that OV should be freed when this filter is freed.  That is, if
410    REL_OV is TRUE, then when the filter is popped or freed OV will be
411    freed after the filter function is called with control set to
412    IOBUFCTRL_FREE.  */
413 int iobuf_push_filter2 (iobuf_t a,
414                         int (*f) (void *opaque, int control, iobuf_t chain,
415                                   byte * buf, size_t * len), void *ov,
416                         int rel_ov);
417
418 /* Pop the top filter.  The top filter must have the filter function F
419    and the cookie OV.  The cookie check is ignored if OV is NULL.  */
420 int iobuf_pop_filter (iobuf_t a,
421                       int (*f) (void *opaque, int control,
422                                 iobuf_t chain, byte * buf, size_t * len),
423                       void *ov);
424
425 /* Used for debugging.  Prints out the chain using log_debug if
426    IOBUF_DEBUG_MODE is not 0.  */
427 int iobuf_print_chain (iobuf_t a);
428
429 /* Indicate that some error occurred on the specified filter.  */
430 #define iobuf_set_error(a)    do { (a)->error = 1; } while(0)
431
432 /* Return any pending error on filter A.  */
433 #define iobuf_error(a)        ((a)->error)
434
435 /* Limit the amount of additional data that may be read from the
436    filter.  That is, if you've already read 100 bytes from A and you
437    set the limit to 50, then you can read up to an additional 50 bytes
438    (i.e., a total of 150 bytes) before EOF is forcefully returned.
439    Setting NLIMIT to 0 removes any active limit.
440
441    Note: using iobuf_seek removes any currently enforced limit!  */
442 void iobuf_set_limit (iobuf_t a, off_t nlimit);
443
444 /* Returns the number of bytes that have been read from the pipeline.
445    Note: the result is undefined for IOBUF_OUTPUT and IOBUF_OUTPUT_TEMP
446    pipelines!  */
447 off_t iobuf_tell (iobuf_t a);
448
449 /* There are two cases:
450
451    - If A is an INPUT or OUTPUT pipeline, then the last filter in the
452      pipeline is found.  If that is not a file filter, -1 is returned.
453      Otherwise, an fseek(..., SEEK_SET) is performed on the file
454      descriptor.
455
456    - If A is a TEMP pipeline and the *first* (and thus only filter) is
457      a TEMP filter, then the "file position" is effectively unchanged.
458      That is, data is appended to the buffer and the seek does not
459      cause the size of the buffer to grow.
460
461    If no error occurred, then any limit previous set by
462    iobuf_set_limit() is cleared.  Further, any error on the filter
463    (the file filter or the temp filter) is cleared.
464
465    Returns 0 on success and -1 if an error occurs.  */
466 int iobuf_seek (iobuf_t a, off_t newpos);
467
468 /* Read a single byte.  If a filter has no more data, returns -1 to
469    indicate the EOF.  Generally, you don't want to use this function,
470    but instead prefer the iobuf_get macro, which is faster if there is
471    data in the internal buffer.  */
472 int iobuf_readbyte (iobuf_t a);
473
474 /* Get a byte from the iobuf; must check for eof prior to this
475    function.  This function returns values in the range 0 .. 255 or -1
476    to indicate EOF.  iobuf_get_noeof() does not return -1 to indicate
477    EOF, but masks the returned value to be in the range 0 .. 255.  */
478 #define iobuf_get(a)  \
479      (  ((a)->nofast || (a)->d.start >= (a)->d.len )?  \
480         iobuf_readbyte((a)) : ( (a)->nbytes++, (a)->d.buf[(a)->d.start++] ) )
481 #define iobuf_get_noeof(a)    (iobuf_get((a))&0xff)
482
483 /* Fill BUF with up to BUFLEN bytes.  If a filter has no more data,
484    returns -1 to indicate the EOF.  Otherwise returns the number of
485    bytes read.  */
486 int iobuf_read (iobuf_t a, void *buf, unsigned buflen);
487
488 /* Read a line of input (including the '\n') from the pipeline.
489
490    The semantics are the same as for fgets(), but if the buffer is too
491    short a larger one will be allocated up to *MAX_LENGTH and the end
492    of the line except the trailing '\n' discarded.  (Thus,
493    *ADDR_OF_BUFFER must be allocated using malloc().)  If the buffer
494    is enlarged, then *LENGTH_OF_BUFFER will be updated to reflect the
495    new size.  If the line is truncated, then *MAX_LENGTH will be set
496    to 0.  If *ADDR_OF_BUFFER is NULL, a buffer is allocated using
497    malloc().
498
499    A line is considered a byte stream ending in a '\n'.  Returns the
500    number of characters written to the buffer (i.e., excluding any
501    discarded characters due to truncation).  Thus, use this instead of
502    strlen(buffer) to determine the length of the string as this is
503    unreliable if the input contains NUL characters.
504
505    EOF is indicated by a line of length zero.
506
507    The last LF may be missing due to an EOF.  */
508 unsigned iobuf_read_line (iobuf_t a, byte ** addr_of_buffer,
509                           unsigned *length_of_buffer, unsigned *max_length);
510
511 /* Read up to BUFLEN bytes from pipeline A.  Note: this function can't
512    return more than the pipeline's internal buffer size.  The return
513    value is the number of bytes actually written to BUF.  If the
514    filter returns EOF, then this function returns -1.
515
516    This function does not clear any pending EOF.  That is, if the
517    pipeline consists of two filters and the first one returns EOF
518    during the peek, then the subsequent iobuf_read* will still return
519    EOF before returning the data from the second filter.  */
520 int iobuf_peek (iobuf_t a, byte * buf, unsigned buflen);
521
522 /* Write a byte to the pipeline.  Returns 0 on success and an error
523    code otherwise.  */
524 int iobuf_writebyte (iobuf_t a, unsigned c);
525
526 /* Alias for iobuf_writebyte.  */
527 #define iobuf_put(a,c)  iobuf_writebyte(a,c)
528
529 /* Write a sequence of bytes to the pipeline.  Returns 0 on success
530    and an error code otherwise.  */
531 int iobuf_write (iobuf_t a, const void *buf, unsigned buflen);
532
533 /* Write a string (not including the NUL terminator) to the pipeline.
534    Returns 0 on success and an error code otherwise.  */
535 int iobuf_writestr (iobuf_t a, const char *buf);
536
537 /* Flushes the pipeline removing all filters but the sink (the last
538    filter) in the process.  */
539 void iobuf_flush_temp (iobuf_t temp);
540
541 /* Flushes the pipeline SOURCE removing all filters but the sink (the
542    last filter) in the process (i.e., it calls
543    iobuf_flush_temp(source)) and then writes the data to the pipeline
544    DEST.  Note: this doesn't free (iobuf_close()) SOURCE.  Both SOURCE
545    and DEST must be output pipelines.  */
546 int iobuf_write_temp (iobuf_t dest, iobuf_t source);
547
548 /* Flushes each filter in the pipeline (i.e., sends any buffered data
549    to the filter by calling IOBUFCTRL_FLUSH).  Then, copies up to the
550    first BUFLEN bytes from the last filter's internal buffer (which
551    will only be non-empty if it is a temp filter) to the buffer
552    BUFFER.  Returns the number of bytes actually copied.  */
553 size_t iobuf_temp_to_buffer (iobuf_t a, byte * buffer, size_t buflen);
554
555 /* Copies the data from the input iobuf SOURCE to the output iobuf
556    DEST until either an error is encountered or EOF is reached.
557    Returns the number of bytes successfully written.  If an error
558    occurred, then any buffered bytes are not returned to SOURCE and are
559    effectively lost.  To check if an error occurred, use
560    iobuf_error.  */
561 size_t iobuf_copy (iobuf_t dest, iobuf_t source);
562
563 /* Return the size of any underlying file.  This only works with
564    file_filter based pipelines.
565
566    On Win32, it is sometimes not possible to determine the size of
567    files larger than 4GB.  In this case, *OVERFLOW (if not NULL) is
568    set to 1.  Otherwise, *OVERFLOW is set to 0.  */
569 off_t iobuf_get_filelength (iobuf_t a, int *overflow);
570 #define IOBUF_FILELENGTH_LIMIT 0xffffffff
571
572 /* Return the file descriptor designating the underlying file.  This
573    only works with file_filter based pipelines.  */
574 int  iobuf_get_fd (iobuf_t a);
575
576 /* Return the real filename, if available.  This only supports
577    pipelines that end in file filters.  Returns NULL if not
578    available.  */
579 const char *iobuf_get_real_fname (iobuf_t a);
580
581 /* Return the filename or a description thereof.  For instance, for
582    iobuf_open("-"), this will return "[stdin]".  This only supports
583    pipelines that end in file filters.  Returns NULL if not
584    available.  */
585 const char *iobuf_get_fname (iobuf_t a);
586
587 /* Like iobuf_getfname, but instead of returning NULL if no
588    description is available, return "[?]".  */
589 const char *iobuf_get_fname_nonnull (iobuf_t a);
590
591 /* Pushes a filter on the pipeline that interprets the datastream as
592    an OpenPGP data block whose length is encoded using partial body
593    length headers (see Section 4.2.2.4 of RFC 4880).  Concretely, it
594    just returns / writes the data and finishes the packet with an
595    EOF.  */
596 void iobuf_set_partial_body_length_mode (iobuf_t a, size_t len);
597
598 /* If PARTIAL is set, then read from the pipeline until the first EOF
599    is returned.
600
601    If PARTIAL is 0, then read up to N bytes or until the first EOF is
602    returned.
603
604    Recall: a filter can return EOF.  In this case, it and all
605    preceding filters are popped from the pipeline and the next read is
606    from the following filter (which may or may not return EOF).  */
607 void iobuf_skip_rest (iobuf_t a, unsigned long n, int partial);
608
609 #define iobuf_where(a)  "[don't know]"
610
611 /* Each time a filter is allocated (via iobuf_alloc()), a
612    monotonically increasing counter is incremented and this field is
613    set to the new value.  This macro returns that number.  */
614 #define iobuf_id(a)     ((a)->no)
615
616 #define iobuf_get_temp_buffer(a) ( (a)->d.buf )
617 #define iobuf_get_temp_length(a) ( (a)->d.len )
618
619 /* Whether the filter uses an in-memory buffer.  */
620 #define iobuf_is_temp(a)         ( (a)->use == IOBUF_OUTPUT_TEMP )
621
622 #endif /*GNUPG_COMMON_IOBUF_H*/