Added new options
[gnupg.git] / doc / gpgsm.texi
1 @c Copyright (C) 2002 Free Software Foundation, Inc.
2 @c This is part of the GnuPG manual.
3 @c For copying conditions, see the file gnupg.texi.
4
5 @node Invoking GPGSM
6 @chapter Invoking GPGSM
7 @cindex GPGSM command options
8 @cindex command options
9 @cindex options, GPGSM command
10
11 @c man begin DESCRIPTION
12
13 @sc{gpgsm} is a tool similar to @sc{gpg} to provide digital encryption
14 and signing servicesd on X.509 certificates and the CMS protocoll.  It
15 is mainly used as a backend for S/MIME mail processing.  @sc{gpgsm}
16 includes a full features certificate management and complies with all
17 rules defined for the German Sphinx project.
18
19 @c man end
20
21 @xref{Option Index}, for an index to GPGSM's commands and options.
22
23 @menu
24 * GPGSM Commands::        List of all commands.
25 * GPGSM Options::         List of all options.
26 * GPGSM Examples::        Some usage examples.
27
28 Developer information:
29 * Unattended Usage::      Using @sc{gpgsm} from other programs.
30 * GPGSM Protocol::        The protocol the server mode uses.
31 @end menu
32
33 @c man begin COMMANDS
34
35 @node GPGSM Commands
36 @section Commands
37
38 Commands are not distinguished from options execpt for the fact that
39 only one one command is allowed.
40
41 @menu
42 * General Commands::        Commands not specific to the functionality.
43 * Operational Commands::    Commands to select the type of operation.
44 * Certificate Management::  How to manage certificates.
45 @end menu
46
47 @node General Commands
48 @subsection Commands not specific to the function
49
50 @table @gnupgtabopt
51 @item --version
52 @opindex version
53 Print the program version and licensing information.  Not that you can
54 abbreviate this command.
55
56 @item --help, -h
57 @opindex help
58 Print a usage message summarizing the most usefule command-line options.
59 Not that you can abbreviate this command.
60
61 @item --dump-options
62 @opindex dump-options
63 Print a list of all available options and commands.  Not that you can
64 abbreviate this command.
65 @end table
66
67
68
69 @node Operational Commands
70 @subsection Commands to select the type of operation
71
72 @table @gnupgtabopt
73 @item --encrypt
74 @opindex encrypt
75 Perform an encryption.
76
77 @item --decrypt
78 @opindex decrypt
79 Perform a decryption; the type of input is automatically detmerined.  It
80 may either be in binary form or PEM encoded; automatic determination of
81 base-64 encoding is not done.
82
83 @item --sign
84 @opindex sign
85 Create a digital signature.  The key used is either the fist one found
86 in the keybox or thise set with the -u option
87
88 @item --verify
89 @opindex verify
90 Check a signature file for validity.  Depending on the arguments a
91 detached signatrue may also be checked.
92  
93 @item --server
94 @opindex server
95 Run in server mode and wait for commands on the @code{stdin}.
96
97 @item --call-dirmngr @var{command} [@var{args}]
98 @opindex call-dirmngr
99 Behave as a Dirmngr client issuing the request @var{command} with the
100 optional list of @var{args}.  The output of the Dirmngr is printed
101 stdout.  Please note that file names given as arguments should have an
102 absulte file name (i.e. commencing with @code{/} because they are
103 passed verbatim to the Dirmngr and the working directory of the
104 Dirmngr might not be the same as the one of this client.  Currently it
105 is not possible to pass data via stdin to the Dirmngr.  @var{command}
106 should not contain spaces.
107
108 This is command is required for certain maintaining tasks of the dirmngr
109 where a dirmngr must be able to call back to gpgsm.  See the Dirmngr
110 manual for details.
111
112 @item --call-protect-tool @var{arguments}
113 @opindex call-protect-tool
114 Certain maintenance operations are done by an external program call
115 @command{gpg-protect-tool}; this is usually not installed in a directory
116 listed in the PATH variable.  This command provides a simple wrapper to
117 access this tool.  @var{arguments} are passed verbatim to this command;
118 use @samp{--help} to get a list of supported operations. 
119
120
121 @end table
122
123
124 @node Certificate Management
125 @subsection How to manage the certificate and keys
126
127 @table @gnupgtabopt
128 @item --gen-key
129 @opindex gen-key
130 Generate a new key and a certificate request.
131
132 @item --list-keys
133 @opindex list-keys
134 List all available certificates stored in the local key database.
135
136 @item --list-secret-keys
137 @opindex list-secret-keys
138 List all available keys whenre a secret key is available.
139
140 @item --list-external-keys @var{pattern}
141 @opindex list-keys
142 List certificates matching @var{pattern} using an external server.  This
143 utilies the @code{dirmngr} service.  
144
145 @item --delete-keys @var{pattern}
146 @opindex delete-keys
147 Delete the keys matching @var{pattern}.
148
149 @item --export [@var{pattern}]
150 @opindex export
151 Export all certificates stored in the Keybox or those specified by the
152 optional @var{pattern}.  When using along with the @code{--armor} option
153 a few informational lines are prepended before each block.
154
155 @item --learn-card
156 @opindex learn-card
157 Read information about the private keys from the smartcard and import
158 the certificates from there.  This command utilizes the @sc{gpg-agent}
159 and in turn the @sc{scdaemon}.
160
161 @item --passwd @var{user_id}
162 @opindex passwd
163 Change the passphrase of the private key belonging to the certificate
164 specified as @var{user_id}.  Note, that changing the passphrase/PIN of a
165 smartcard is not yet supported.
166
167 @end table
168
169
170 @node GPGSM Options
171 @section Option Summary
172
173 GPGSM comes features a bunch ofoptions to control the exact behaviour
174 and to change the default configuration.
175
176 @menu 
177 * Configuration Options::   How to change the configuration.
178 * Certificate Options::     Certificate related options.
179 * Input and Output::        Input and Output.
180 * CMS Options::             How to change how the CMS is created.
181 * Esoteric Options::        Doing things one usually don't want to do.
182 @end menu
183
184 @c man begin OPTIONS
185
186 @node Configuration Options
187 @subsection How to change the configuration
188
189 These options are used to change the configuraton and are usually found
190 in the option file.
191
192 @table @gnupgtabopt
193
194 @item --options @var{file}
195 @opindex options
196 Reads configuration from @var{file} instead of from the default
197 per-user configuration file.  The default configuration file is named
198 @file{gpgsm.conf} and expected in the @file{.gnupg} directory directly
199 below the home directory of the user.
200
201 @item -v
202 @item --verbose
203 @opindex v
204 @opindex verbose
205 Outputs additional information while running.
206 You can increase the verbosity by giving several
207 verbose commands to @sc{gpgsm}, such as @samp{-vv}.
208
209 @item --policy-file @var{filename}
210 @opindex policy-file
211 Change the default name of the policy file to @var{filename}.
212
213 @item --agent-program @var{file}
214 @opindex agent-program
215 Specify an agent program to be used for secret key operations.  The
216 default value is the @file{/usr/local/bin/gpg-agent}.  This is only used
217 as a fallback when the envrionment variable @code{GPG_AGENT_INFO} is not
218 set or a running agent can't be connected.
219   
220 @item --dirmngr-program @var{file}
221 @opindex dirmnr-program
222 Specify a dirmngr program to be used for @acronym{CRL} checks.  The
223 default value is @file{/usr/sbin/dirmngr}.  This is only used as a
224 fallback when the environment variable @code{DIRMNGR_INFO} is not set or
225 a running dirmngr can't be connected.
226
227 @item --no-secmem-warning
228 @opindex no-secmem-warning
229 Don't print a warning when the so called "secure memory" can't be used.
230
231
232
233 @end table
234
235
236 @node Certificate Options
237 @subsection Certificate related options
238
239 @table @gnupgtabopt
240
241 @item  --enable-policy-checks
242 @itemx --disable-policy-checks
243 @opindex enable-policy-checks
244 @opindex disable-policy-checks
245 By default policy checks are enabled.  These options may be used to
246 change it.
247
248 @item  --enable-crl-checks
249 @itemx --disable-crl-checks
250 @opindex enable-crl-checks
251 @opindex disable-crl-checks
252 By default the @acronym{CRL} checks are enabled and the DirMngr is used
253 to check for revoked certificates.  The disable option is most useful
254 with an off-line network connection to suppress this check.
255
256 @item  --enable-ocsp
257 @itemx --disable-ocsp
258 @opindex enable-ocsp
259 @opindex disable-ocsp
260 Be default @acronym{OCSP} checks are disabled.  The enable opton may
261 be used to enable OCSP checks via Dirmngr.  If @acronym{CRL} checks
262 are also enabled, CRLs willbe used as a fallback if for some reason an
263 OCSP request won't succeed.
264
265 @end table
266
267 @node Input and Output
268 @subsection Input and Output
269
270 @table @gnupgtabopt
271 @item --armor
272 @itemx -a
273 @opindex armor
274 @opindex -a
275 Create PEM encoded output.  Default is binary output. 
276
277 @item --base64 
278 @opindex base64
279 Create Base-64 encoded output; i.e. PEM without the header lines.
280
281 @item --assume-armor
282 @opindex assume-armor
283 Assume the input data is PEM encoded.  Default is to autodetect the
284 encoding but this is may fail.
285
286 @item --assume-base64
287 @opindex assume-base64
288 Assume the input data is plain base-64 encoded.
289
290 @item --assume-binary
291 @opindex assume-binary
292 Assume the input data is binary encoded.
293
294 @item --local-user @var{user_id}
295 @item -u @var{user_id}
296 @opindex local-user
297 @opindex -u
298 Set the user(s) to be used for signing.  The default is the first
299 secret key found in the database.
300
301 @item --with-key-data
302 @opindex with-key-data
303 Displays extra information with the @code{--list-keys} commands.  Especially
304 a line tagged @code{grp} is printed which tells you the keygrip of a
305 key.  This string is for example used as the file name of the
306 secret key.
307
308 @item --with-validation
309 @opindex with-validation
310 When doing a key listing, do a full validation check for each key and
311 print the result.  This is usually a slow operation because it
312 requires a CRL lookup and other operations.
313
314 @item --with-md5-fingerprint
315 For standard key listings, also print the MD5 fingerprint of the
316 certificate.
317
318 @end table
319
320 @node CMS Options
321 @subsection How to change how the CMS is created.
322
323 @table @gnupgtabopt
324 @item --include-certs @var{n}
325 Using @var{n} of -2 includes all certificate except for the root cert,
326 -1 includes all certs, 0 does not include any certs, 1 includes only
327 the signers cert (this is the default) and all other positive
328 values include up to @var{n} certificates starting with the signer cert.
329   
330 @end table
331
332
333
334 @node Esoteric Options
335 @subsection Doing things one usually don't want todo.
336
337
338 @table @gnupgtabopt
339
340 @item --faked-system-time @var{epoch}
341 @opindex faked-system-time
342 This option is only useful for testing; it sets the system time back or
343 forth to @var{epoch} which is the number of seconds elapsed since the year
344 1970.
345
346 @item --debug @var{flags}
347 @opindex debug
348 This option is only useful for debugging and the behaviour may change at
349 any time without notice.  FLAGS are bit encoded and may be given in
350 usual C-Syntax. The currently defined bits are:
351    @table @code
352    @item 0  (1)
353    X.509 or OpenPGP protocol related data
354    @item 1  (2)  
355    values of big number integers 
356    @item 2  (4)
357    low level crypto operations
358    @item 5  (32)
359    memory allocation
360    @item 6  (64)
361    caching
362    @item 7  (128)
363    show memory statistics.
364    @item 9  (512)
365    write hashed data to files named @code{dbgmd-000*}
366    @item 10 (1024)
367    trace Assuan protocol
368    @item 12 (4096)
369    bypass all certificate validation
370    @end table
371
372 @item --debug-all
373 @opindex debug-all
374 Same as @code{--debug=0xffffffff}
375
376 @item --debug-no-chain-validation
377 @opindex debug-no-chain-validation
378 This is actually not a debugging option but only useful as such.  It
379 lets gpgsm bypass all certificate chain validation checks.
380
381 @end table
382
383 All the long options may also be given in the configuration file after
384 stripping off the two leading dashes.
385
386
387
388 @c 
389 @c  Examples
390 @c
391 @node GPGSM Examples
392 @section Examples
393
394 @c man begin EXAMPLES
395
396 @example
397 $ gpgsm -er goo@@bar.net <plaintext >ciphertext
398 @end example
399
400 @c man end
401
402
403
404 @c ---------------------------------
405 @c    The machine interface
406 @c --------------------------------
407 @node Unattended Usage
408 @section Unattended Usage
409
410 @sc{gpgsm} is often used as a backend engine by other software.  To help
411 with this a machine interface has been defined to have an unambiguous
412 way to do this.  This is most likely used with the @code{--server} command
413 but may also be used in the standard operation mode by using the
414 @code{--status-fd} option.
415
416 @menu
417 * Automated signature checking::  Automated signature checking.
418 @end menu
419
420 @node Automated signature checking,,,Unattended Usage
421 @section Automated signature checking
422
423 It is very important to understand the semantics used with signature
424 verification.  Checking a signature is not as simple as it may sound and
425 so the ooperation si a bit complicated.  In mosted cases it is required
426 to look at several status lines.  Here is a table of all cases a signed
427 message may have:
428
429 @table @asis
430 @item The signature is valid
431 This does mean that the signature has been successfully verified, the
432 certificates are all sane.  However there are two subcases with
433 important information:  One of the certificates may have expired or a
434 signature of a message itself as expired.  It is a sound practise to
435 consider such a signature still as valid but additional information
436 should be displayed.  Depending on the subcase @sc{gpgsm} will issue
437 these status codes:
438   @table @asis 
439   @item signature valid and nothing did expire
440   @code{GOODSIG}, @code{VALIDSIG}, @code{TRUST_FULLY}
441   @item signature valid but at least one certificate has expired
442   @code{EXPKEYSIG}, @code{VALIDSIG}, @code{TRUST_FULLY}
443   @item signature valid but expired
444   @code{EXPSIG}, @code{VALIDSIG}, @code{TRUST_FULLY}
445   Note, that this case is currently not implemented.
446   @end table
447
448 @item The signature is invalid
449 This means that the signature verification failed (this is an indication
450 of af a transfer error, a programm error or tampering with the message).
451 @sc{gpgsm} issues one of these status codes sequences:
452   @table @code
453   @item  @code{BADSIG}
454   @item  @code{GOODSIG}, @code{VALIDSIG} @code{TRUST_NEVER}
455   @end table
456
457 @item Error verifying a signature
458 For some reason the signature could not be verified, i.e. it can't be
459 decided whether the signature is valid or invalid.  A common reason for
460 this is a missing certificate.
461
462 @end table
463
464
465 @c 
466 @c  Assuan Protocol
467 @c
468 @node GPGSM Protocol
469 @section The Protocol the Server Mode Uses.
470
471 Description of the protocol used to access GPGSM.  GPGSM does implement
472 the Assuan protocol and in addition provides a regular command line
473 interface which exhibits a full client to this protocol (but uses
474 internal linking).  To start gpgsm as a server the commandline "gpgsm
475 --server" must be used.  Additional options are provided to select the
476 communication method (i.e. the name of the socket).
477
478 We assume that the connection has already been established; see the
479 Assuan manual for details.
480
481 @menu
482 * GPGSM ENCRYPT::         Encrypting a message.
483 * GPGSM DECRYPT::         Decrypting a message.
484 * GPGSM SIGN::            Signing a message.
485 * GPGSM VERIFY::          Verifying a message.
486 * GPGSM GENKEY::          Generating a key.
487 * GPGSM LISTKEYS::        List available keys.
488 * GPGSM EXPORT::          Export certificates.
489 * GPGSM IMPORT::          Import certificates.
490 * GPGSM DELETE::          Delete certificates.
491 @end menu
492
493
494 @node GPGSM ENCRYPT
495 @subsection Encrypting a Message
496
497 Before encrytion can be done the recipient must be set using the
498 command:
499
500 @example
501   RECIPIENT @var{userID}
502 @end example
503
504 Set the recipient for the encryption.  @var{userID} should be the
505 internal representation of the key; the server may accept any other way
506 of specification.  If this is a valid and trusted recipient the server
507 does respond with OK, otherwise the return is an ERR with the reason why
508 the recipient can't be used, the encryption will then not be done for
509 this recipient.  If the policy is not to encrypt at all if not all
510 recipients are valid, the client has to take care of this.  All
511 @code{RECIPIENT} commands are cumulative until a @code{RESET} or an
512 successful @code{ENCRYPT} command.
513
514 @example
515   INPUT FD=@var{n} [--armor|--base64|--binary]
516 @end example
517
518 Set the file descriptor for the message to be encrypted to @var{n}.
519 Obviously the pipe must be open at that point, the server establishes
520 its own end.  If the server returns an error the client should consider
521 this session failed.
522
523 The @code{--armor} option may be used to advice the server that the
524 input data is in @acronym{PEM} format, @code{--base64} advices that a
525 raw base-64 encoding is used, @code{--binary} advices of raw binary
526 input (@acronym{BER}).  If none of these options is used, the server
527 tries to figure out the used encoding, but this may not always be
528 correct.
529
530 @example
531   OUTPUT FD=@var{n} [--armor|--base64]
532 @end example
533
534 Set the file descriptor to be used for the output (i.e. the encrypted
535 message). Obviously the pipe must be open at that point, the server
536 establishes its own end.  If the server returns an error he client
537 should consider this session failed.
538
539 The option armor encodes the output in @acronym{PEM} format, the
540 @code{--base64} option applies just a base 64 encoding.  No option
541 creates binary output (@acronym{BER}).
542   
543 The actual encryption is done using the command
544
545 @example
546   ENCRYPT 
547 @end example
548
549 It takes the plaintext from the @code{INPUT} command, writes to the
550 ciphertext to the file descriptor set with the @code{OUTPUT} command,
551 take the recipients from all the recipients set so far.  If this command
552 fails the clients should try to delete all output currently done or
553 otherwise mark it as invalid.  GPGSM does ensure that there won't be any
554 security problem with leftover data on the output in this case.
555
556 This command should in general not fail, as all necessary checks have
557 been done while setting the recipients.  The input and output pipes are
558 closed.
559
560
561 @node GPGSM DECRYPT
562 @subsection Decrypting a message
563
564 Input and output FDs are set the same way as in encryption, but
565 @code{INPUT} refers to the ciphertext and output to the plaintext. There
566 is no need to set recipients.  GPGSM automatically strips any
567 @acronym{S/MIME} headers from the input, so it is valid to pass an
568 entire MIME part to the INPUT pipe.
569
570 The encryption is done by using the command
571
572 @example
573   DECRYPT
574 @end example
575
576 It performs the decrypt operation after doing some check on the internal
577 state. (e.g. that all needed data has been set).  Because it utilizes
578 the GPG-Agent for the session key decryption, there is no need to ask
579 the client for a protecting passphrase - GpgAgent takes care of this by
580 requesting this from the user.
581
582
583 @node GPGSM SIGN
584 @subsection Signing a Message
585
586 Signing is usually done with these commands:
587
588 @example
589   INPUT FD=@var{n} [--armor|--base64|--binary]
590 @end example
591
592 This tells GPGSM to read the data to sign from file descriptor @var{n}.
593
594 @example
595   OUTPUT FD=@var{m} [--armor|--base64]
596 @end example
597
598 Write the output to file descriptor @var{m}.  If a detached signature is
599 requested, only the signature is written.
600
601 @example
602   SIGN [--detached] 
603 @end example
604
605 Sign the data set with the INPUT command and write it to the sink set by
606 OUTPUT.  With @code{--detached}, a detached signature is created
607 (surprise).
608
609 The key used for signining is the default one or the one specified in
610 the configuration file.  To get finer control over the keys, it is
611 possible to use the command
612
613 @example
614   SIGNER @var{userID}
615 @end example
616
617 to the signer's key.  @var{userID} should be the
618 internal representation of the key; the server may accept any other way
619 of specification.  If this is a valid and trusted recipient the server
620 does respond with OK, otherwise the return is an ERR with the reason why
621 the key can't be used, the signature will then not be created using
622 this key.  If the policy is not to sign at all if not all
623 keys are valid, the client has to take care of this.  All
624 @code{SIGNER} commands are cumulative until a @code{RESET} is done.
625 Note that a @code{SIGN} does not reset this list of signers which is in
626 contrats to the @code{RECIPIENT} command.
627
628
629 @node GPGSM VERIFY
630 @subsection Verifying a Message
631
632 To verify a mesage the command:
633
634 @example
635   VERIFY
636 @end example
637
638 is used. It does a verify operation on the message send to the input FD.
639 The result is written out using status lines.  If an output FD was
640 given, the signed text will be written to that.  If the signature is a
641 detached one, the server will inquire about the signed material and the
642 client must provide it.
643
644 @node GPGSM GENKEY
645 @subsection Generating a Key
646
647 This is used to generate a new keypair, store the secret part in the
648 @acronym{PSE} and the public key in the key database.  We will probably
649 add optional commands to allow the client to select whether a hardware
650 token is used to store the key.  Configuration options to GPGSM can be
651 used to restrict the use of this command.
652
653 @example
654   GENKEY 
655 @end example
656
657 GPGSM checks whether this command is allowed and then does an
658 INQUIRY to get the key parameters, the client should then send the
659 key parameters in the native format:
660
661 @example
662     S: INQUIRE KEY_PARAM native
663     C: D foo:fgfgfg
664     C: D bar
665     C: END
666 @end example    
667
668 Please note that the server may send Status info lines while reading the
669 data lines from the client.  After this the key generation takes place
670 and the server eventually does send an ERR or OK response.  Status lines
671 may be issued as a progress indicator.
672
673
674 @node GPGSM LISTKEYS
675 @subsection List available keys
676
677 To list the keys in the internal database or using an external key
678 provider, the command:
679
680 @example
681   LISTKEYS  @var{pattern}
682 @end example
683
684 is used.  To allow multiple patterns (which are ORed during the search)
685 quoting is required: Spaces are to be translated into "+" or into "%20";
686 in turn this requires that the usual escape quoting rules are done.
687
688 @example
689   LISTSECRETKEYS @var{pattern}
690 @end example
691
692 Lists only the keys where a secret key is available.
693
694 The list commands  commands are affected by the option
695
696 @example
697   OPTION list-mode=@var{mode}
698 @end example
699
700 where mode may be:
701 @table @code
702 @item 0 
703 Use default (which is usually the same as 1).
704 @item 1
705 List only the internal keys.
706 @item 2
707 List only the external keys.
708 @item 3
709 List internal and external keys.
710 @end table
711
712 Note that options are valid for the entire session.
713     
714
715 @node GPGSM EXPORT
716 @subsection Export certificates
717
718 To export certificate from the internal key database the command:
719
720 @example
721   EXPORT @var{pattern}
722 @end example
723
724 is used.  To allow multiple patterns (which are ORed) quoting is
725 required: Spaces are to be translated into "+" or into "%20"; in turn
726 this requires that the usual escape quoting rules are done.
727
728 The format of the output depends on what was set with the OUTPUT
729 command.  When using @acronym{PEM} encoding a few informational lines
730 are prepended.
731
732
733 @node GPGSM IMPORT
734 @subsection Import certificates
735
736 To import certificates into the internal key database, the command
737
738 @example
739   IMPORT
740 @end example
741
742 is used.  The data is expected on the file descriptor set with the
743 @code{INPUT} command.  Certain checks are performend on the
744 certificate.  Note that the code will also handle PKCS\#12 files and
745 import private keys; a helper program is used for that.
746
747
748 @node GPGSM DELETE
749 @subsection Delete certificates
750
751 To delete certificate the command
752
753 @example
754   DELKEYS @var{pattern}
755 @end example
756
757 is used.  To allow multiple patterns (which are ORed) quoting is
758 required: Spaces are to be translated into "+" or into "%20"; in turn
759 this requires that the usual escape quoting rules are done.
760
761 The certificates must be specified unambiguously otherwise an error is
762 returned.
763