Add OPTION:cache-ttl-opt-preset to gpg-agent.
[gnupg.git] / doc / help.txt
1 # help.txt - English GnuPG online help
2 # Copyright (C) 2007 Free Software Foundation, Inc.
3 #
4 # This file is part of GnuPG.
5 #
6 # GnuPG is free software; you can redistribute it and/or modify
7 # it under the terms of the GNU General Public License as published by
8 # the Free Software Foundation; either version 3 of the License, or
9 # (at your option) any later version.
10
11 # GnuPG is distributed in the hope that it will be useful,
12 # but WITHOUT ANY WARRANTY; without even the implied warranty of
13 # MERCHANTABILITY or FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE.  See the
14 # GNU General Public License for more details.
15
16 # You should have received a copy of the GNU General Public License
17 # along with this program; if not, see <http://www.gnu.org/licenses/>.
18
19
20 # Note that this help file needs to be UTF-8 encoded.  When looking
21 # for a help item, GnuPG scans the help files in the following order
22 # (assuming a GNU or Unix system):
23 #
24 #    /etc/gnupg/help.LL_TT.txt
25 #    /etc/gnupg/help.LL.txt
26 #    /etc/gnupg/help.txt
27 #    /usr/share/gnupg/help.LL_TT.txt
28 #    /usr/share/gnupg/help.LL.txt
29 #    /usr/share/gnupg/help.txt
30 #    
31 # Here LL_TT denotes the full name of the current locale with the
32 # territory (.e.g. "de_DE"), LL denotes just the locale name
33 # (e.g. "de").  The first matching item is returned.  To put a dot or
34 # a hash mark at the beginning of a help text line, it needs to be
35 # prefixed with ". ".  A single dot may be used to terminated ahelp
36 # entry.
37
38 .#pinentry.qualitybar.tooltip
39 # [remove the hash mark from the key to enable this text]
40 # This entry is just an example on how to customize the tooltip shown
41 # when hovering over the quality bar of the pinentry.  We don't
42 # install this text so that the hardcoded translation takes
43 # precedence.  An administrator should write up a short help to tell
44 # the users about the configured passphrase constraints and save that
45 # to /etc/gnupg/help.txt.  The help text should not be longer than
46 # about 800 characters.
47 This bar indicates the quality of the passphrase entered above.  
48
49 As long as the bar is shown in red, GnuPG considers the passphrase too
50 weak to accept.  Please ask your administrator for details about the
51 configured passphrase constraints.
52 .
53
54
55 .gnupg.agent-problem
56 # There was a problem accessing or starting the agent.
57 It was either not possible to connect to a running Gpg-Agent or a
58 communication problem with a running agent occurred.  
59
60 The system uses a background process, called Gpg-Agent, for processing
61 private keys and to ask for passphrases.  The agent is usually started
62 when the user logs in and runs as long the user is logged in. In case
63 that no agent is available, the system tries to start one on the fly
64 but that version of the agent is somewhat limited in functionality and
65 thus may lead to little problems.
66
67 You probably need to ask your administrator on how to solve the
68 problem.  As a workaround you might try to log out and in to your
69 session and see whether this helps.  If this helps please tell the
70 administrator anyway because this indicates a bug in the software.
71 .
72
73
74 .gnupg.dirmngr-problem
75 # There was a problen accessing the dirmngr.
76 It was either not possible to connect to a running Dirmngr or a
77 communication problem with a running Dirmngr occurred.  
78
79 To lookup certificate revocation lists (CRLs), performing OCSP
80 validation and to lookup keys through LDAP servers, the system uses an
81 external service program named Dirmngr.  The Dirmngr is usually running
82 as a system service (daemon) and does not need any attention by the
83 user.  In case of problems the system might start its own copy of the
84 Dirmngr on a per request base; this is a workaround and yields limited
85 performance.
86
87 If you encounter this problem, you should ask your system
88 administrator how to proceed.  As an interim solution you may try to
89 disable CRL checking in gpgsm's configuration.
90 .
91
92
93 .gpg.edit_ownertrust.value
94 # The help identies prefixed with "gpg." used to be hard coded in gpg
95 # but may now be overridden by help texts from this file.
96 It's up to you to assign a value here; this value will never be exported
97 to any 3rd party.  We need it to implement the web-of-trust; it has nothing
98 to do with the (implicitly created) web-of-certificates.
99 .
100
101 .gpg.edit_ownertrust.set_ultimate.okay
102 To build the Web-of-Trust, GnuPG needs to know which keys are
103 ultimately trusted - those are usually the keys for which you have
104 access to the secret key.  Answer "yes" to set this key to
105 ultimately trusted.
106
107
108 .gpg.untrusted_key.override
109 If you want to use this untrusted key anyway, answer "yes".
110 .
111
112 .gpg.pklist.user_id.enter
113 Enter the user ID of the addressee to whom you want to send the message.
114 .
115
116 .gpg.keygen.algo
117 Select the algorithm to use.
118
119 DSA (aka DSS) is the Digital Signature Algorithm and can only be used
120 for signatures.
121
122 Elgamal is an encrypt-only algorithm.
123
124 RSA may be used for signatures or encryption.
125
126 The first (primary) key must always be a key which is capable of signing.
127 .
128
129
130 .gpg.keygen.algo.rsa_se
131 In general it is not a good idea to use the same key for signing and
132 encryption.  This algorithm should only be used in certain domains.
133 Please consult your security expert first.
134 .
135
136
137 .gpg.keygen.size
138 Enter the size of the key.  
139
140 The suggested default is usually a good choice.
141
142 If you want to use a large key size, for example 4096 bit, please
143 think again whether it really makes sense for you.  You may want 
144 to view the web page http://www.xkcd.com/538/ .
145 .
146
147 .gpg.keygen.size.huge.okay
148 Answer "yes" or "no".
149 .
150
151
152 .gpg.keygen.size.large.okay
153 Answer "yes" or "no".
154 .
155
156
157 .gpg.keygen.valid
158 Enter the required value as shown in the prompt.
159 It is possible to enter a ISO date (YYYY-MM-DD) but you won't
160 get a good error response - instead the system tries to interpret
161 the given value as an interval.
162 .
163
164 .gpg.keygen.valid.okay
165 Answer "yes" or "no".
166 .
167
168
169 .gpg.keygen.name
170 Enter the name of the key holder. 
171 The characters "<" and ">" are not allowed.
172 Example: Heinrich Heine
173 .
174
175
176 .gpg.keygen.email
177 Please enter an optional but highly suggested email address.
178 Example: heinrichh@duesseldorf.de
179 .
180
181 .gpg.keygen.comment
182 Please enter an optional comment.
183 The characters "(" and ")" are not allowed.
184 In general there is no need for a comment.
185 .
186
187
188 .gpg.keygen.userid.cmd
189 # (Keep a leading empty line)
190
191 N  to change the name.
192 C  to change the comment.
193 E  to change the email address.
194 O  to continue with key generation.
195 Q  to to quit the key generation.
196 .
197
198 .gpg.keygen.sub.okay
199 Answer "yes" (or just "y") if it is okay to generate the sub key.
200 .
201
202 .gpg.sign_uid.okay
203 Answer "yes" or "no".
204 .
205
206 .gpg.sign_uid.class
207 When you sign a user ID on a key, you should first verify that the key
208 belongs to the person named in the user ID.  It is useful for others to
209 know how carefully you verified this.
210
211 "0" means you make no particular claim as to how carefully you verified the
212     key.
213
214 "1" means you believe the key is owned by the person who claims to own it
215     but you could not, or did not verify the key at all.  This is useful for
216     a "persona" verification, where you sign the key of a pseudonymous user.
217
218 "2" means you did casual verification of the key.  For example, this could
219     mean that you verified the key fingerprint and checked the user ID on the
220     key against a photo ID.
221
222 "3" means you did extensive verification of the key.  For example, this could
223     mean that you verified the key fingerprint with the owner of the key in
224     person, and that you checked, by means of a hard to forge document with a
225     photo ID (such as a passport) that the name of the key owner matches the
226     name in the user ID on the key, and finally that you verified (by exchange
227     of email) that the email address on the key belongs to the key owner.
228
229 Note that the examples given above for levels 2 and 3 are *only* examples.
230 In the end, it is up to you to decide just what "casual" and "extensive"
231 mean to you when you sign other keys.
232
233 If you don't know what the right answer is, answer "0".
234 .
235
236 .gpg.change_passwd.empty.okay
237 Answer "yes" or "no".
238 .
239
240
241 .gpg.keyedit.save.okay
242 Answer "yes" or "no".
243 .
244
245
246 .gpg.keyedit.cancel.okay
247 Answer "yes" or "no".
248 .
249
250 .gpg.keyedit.sign_all.okay
251 Answer "yes" if you want to sign ALL the user IDs.
252 .
253
254 .gpg.keyedit.remove.uid.okay
255 Answer "yes" if you really want to delete this user ID.
256 All certificates are then also lost!
257 .
258
259 .gpg.keyedit.remove.subkey.okay
260 Answer "yes" if it is okay to delete the subkey.
261 .
262
263
264 .gpg.keyedit.delsig.valid
265 This is a valid signature on the key; you normally don't want
266 to delete this signature because it may be important to establish a
267 trust connection to the key or another key certified by this key.
268 .
269
270 .gpg.keyedit.delsig.unknown
271 This signature can't be checked because you don't have the
272 corresponding key.  You should postpone its deletion until you
273 know which key was used because this signing key might establish
274 a trust connection through another already certified key.
275 .
276
277 .gpg.keyedit.delsig.invalid
278 The signature is not valid.  It does make sense to remove it from
279 your keyring.
280 .
281
282 .gpg.keyedit.delsig.selfsig
283 This is a signature which binds the user ID to the key. It is
284 usually not a good idea to remove such a signature.  Actually
285 GnuPG might not be able to use this key anymore.  So do this
286 only if this self-signature is for some reason not valid and
287 a second one is available.
288 .
289
290 .gpg.keyedit.updpref.okay
291 Change the preferences of all user IDs (or just of the selected ones)
292 to the current list of preferences.  The timestamp of all affected
293 self-signatures will be advanced by one second.
294 .
295
296
297 .gpg.passphrase.enter
298 # (keep a leading empty line)
299
300 Please enter the passhrase; this is a secret sentence.
301 .
302
303
304 .gpg.passphrase.repeat
305 Please repeat the last passphrase, so you are sure what you typed in.
306 .
307
308 .gpg.detached_signature.filename
309 Give the name of the file to which the signature applies.
310 .
311
312 .gpg.openfile.overwrite.okay
313 # openfile.c (overwrite_filep)
314 Answer "yes" if it is okay to overwrite the file.
315 .
316
317 .gpg.openfile.askoutname
318 # openfile.c (ask_outfile_name)
319 Please enter a new filename.  If you just hit RETURN the default
320 file (which is shown in brackets) will be used.
321 .
322
323 .gpg.ask_revocation_reason.code
324 # revoke.c (ask_revocation_reason) 
325 You should specify a reason for the certification.  Depending on the
326 context you have the ability to choose from this list:
327   "Key has been compromised"
328       Use this if you have a reason to believe that unauthorized persons
329       got access to your secret key.
330   "Key is superseded"
331       Use this if you have replaced this key with a newer one.
332   "Key is no longer used"
333       Use this if you have retired this key.
334   "User ID is no longer valid"
335       Use this to state that the user ID should not longer be used;
336       this is normally used to mark an email address invalid.
337 .
338
339 .gpg.ask_revocation_reason.text
340 # revoke.c (ask_revocation_reason)
341 If you like, you can enter a text describing why you issue this
342 revocation certificate.  Please keep this text concise.
343 An empty line ends the text.
344 .
345
346
347
348
349 .gpgsm.root-cert-not-trusted
350 # This text gets displayed by the audit log if
351 # a root certificates was not trusted.
352 The root certificate (the trust-anchor) is not trusted.  Depending on
353 the configuration you may have been prompted to mark that root
354 certificate as trusted or you need to manually tell GnuPG to trust that
355 certificate.  Trusted certificates are configured in the file
356 trustlist.txt in GnuPG's home directory.  If you are in doubt, ask
357 your system administrator whether you should trust this certificate.
358
359
360 .gpgsm.crl-problem
361 # This tex is displayed by the audit log for problems with
362 # the CRL or OCSP checking.
363 Depending on your configuration a problem retrieving the CRL or
364 performing an OCSP check occurred.  There are a great variety of
365 reasons why this did not work.  Check the manual for possible
366 solutions.
367
368
369 # Local variables:
370 # mode: default-generic
371 # coding: utf-8
372 # End: