gpg: Fix using --decrypt along with --use-embedded-filename.
[gnupg.git] / INSTALL
diff --git a/INSTALL b/INSTALL
index 095b1eb..5458714 100644 (file)
--- a/INSTALL
+++ b/INSTALL
@@ -1,8 +1,8 @@
 Installation Instructions
 *************************
 
-Copyright (C) 1994, 1995, 1996, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2004 Free
-Software Foundation, Inc.
+Copyright (C) 1994, 1995, 1996, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2004, 2005,
+2006 Free Software Foundation, Inc.
 
 This file is free documentation; the Free Software Foundation gives
 unlimited permission to copy, distribute and modify it.
@@ -10,7 +10,10 @@ unlimited permission to copy, distribute and modify it.
 Basic Installation
 ==================
 
-These are generic installation instructions.
+Briefly, the shell commands `./configure; make; make install' should
+configure, build, and install this package.  The following
+more-detailed instructions are generic; see the `README' file for
+instructions specific to this package.
 
    The `configure' shell script attempts to guess correct values for
 various system-dependent variables used during compilation.  It uses
@@ -23,9 +26,9 @@ debugging `configure').
 
    It can also use an optional file (typically called `config.cache'
 and enabled with `--cache-file=config.cache' or simply `-C') that saves
-the results of its tests to speed up reconfiguring.  (Caching is
+the results of its tests to speed up reconfiguring.  Caching is
 disabled by default to prevent problems with accidental use of stale
-cache files.)
+cache files.
 
    If you need to do unusual things to compile the package, please try
 to figure out how `configure' could check whether to do them, and mail
@@ -35,20 +38,17 @@ some point `config.cache' contains results you don't want to keep, you
 may remove or edit it.
 
    The file `configure.ac' (or `configure.in') is used to create
-`configure' by a program called `autoconf'.  You only need
-`configure.ac' if you want to change it or regenerate `configure' using
-a newer version of `autoconf'.
+`configure' by a program called `autoconf'.  You need `configure.ac' if
+you want to change it or regenerate `configure' using a newer version
+of `autoconf'.
 
 The simplest way to compile this package is:
 
   1. `cd' to the directory containing the package's source code and type
-     `./configure' to configure the package for your system.  If you're
-     using `csh' on an old version of System V, you might need to type
-     `sh ./configure' instead to prevent `csh' from trying to execute
-     `configure' itself.
+     `./configure' to configure the package for your system.
 
-     Running `configure' takes awhile.  While running, it prints some
-     messages telling which features it is checking for.
+     Running `configure' might take a while.  While running, it prints
+     some messages telling which features it is checking for.
 
   2. Type `make' to compile the package.
 
@@ -78,7 +78,7 @@ details on some of the pertinent environment variables.
 by setting variables in the command line or in the environment.  Here
 is an example:
 
-     ./configure CC=c89 CFLAGS=-O2 LIBS=-lposix
+     ./configure CC=c99 CFLAGS=-g LIBS=-lposix
 
    *Note Defining Variables::, for more details.
 
@@ -87,31 +87,29 @@ Compiling For Multiple Architectures
 
 You can compile the package for more than one kind of computer at the
 same time, by placing the object files for each architecture in their
-own directory.  To do this, you must use a version of `make' that
-supports the `VPATH' variable, such as GNU `make'.  `cd' to the
+own directory.  To do this, you can use GNU `make'.  `cd' to the
 directory where you want the object files and executables to go and run
 the `configure' script.  `configure' automatically checks for the
 source code in the directory that `configure' is in and in `..'.
 
-   If you have to use a `make' that does not support the `VPATH'
-variable, you have to compile the package for one architecture at a
-time in the source code directory.  After you have installed the
-package for one architecture, use `make distclean' before reconfiguring
-for another architecture.
+   With a non-GNU `make', it is safer to compile the package for one
+architecture at a time in the source code directory.  After you have
+installed the package for one architecture, use `make distclean' before
+reconfiguring for another architecture.
 
 Installation Names
 ==================
 
-By default, `make install' will install the package's files in
-`/usr/local/bin', `/usr/local/man', etc.  You can specify an
-installation prefix other than `/usr/local' by giving `configure' the
-option `--prefix=PREFIX'.
+By default, `make install' installs the package's commands under
+`/usr/local/bin', include files under `/usr/local/include', etc.  You
+can specify an installation prefix other than `/usr/local' by giving
+`configure' the option `--prefix=PREFIX'.
 
    You can specify separate installation prefixes for
 architecture-specific files and architecture-independent files.  If you
-give `configure' the option `--exec-prefix=PREFIX', the package will
-use PREFIX as the prefix for installing programs and libraries.
-Documentation and other data files will still use the regular prefix.
+pass the option `--exec-prefix=PREFIX' to `configure', the package uses
+PREFIX as the prefix for installing programs and libraries.
+Documentation and other data files still use the regular prefix.
 
    In addition, if you use an unusual directory layout you can give
 options like `--bindir=DIR' to specify different values for particular
@@ -159,7 +157,7 @@ where SYSTEM can have one of these forms:
 need to know the machine type.
 
    If you are _building_ compiler tools for cross-compiling, you should
-use the `--target=TYPE' option to select the type of system they will
+use the option `--target=TYPE' to select the type of system they will
 produce code for.
 
    If you want to _use_ a cross compiler, that generates code for a
@@ -189,9 +187,14 @@ them in the `configure' command line, using `VAR=value'.  For example:
 
      ./configure CC=/usr/local2/bin/gcc
 
-will cause the specified gcc to be used as the C compiler (unless it is
+causes the specified `gcc' to be used as the C compiler (unless it is
 overridden in the site shell script).
 
+Unfortunately, this technique does not work for `CONFIG_SHELL' due to
+an Autoconf bug.  Until the bug is fixed you can use this workaround:
+
+     CONFIG_SHELL=/bin/bash /bin/bash ./configure CONFIG_SHELL=/bin/bash
+
 `configure' Invocation
 ======================