Exporting secret keys via gpg-agent is now basically supported.
[gnupg.git] / doc / debugging.texi
index fb27b27..26383c0 100644 (file)
@@ -10,13 +10,14 @@ there is a need to track down problems.  We call this debugging in a
 reminiscent to the moth jamming a relay in a Mark II box back in 1947.
 
 Most of the problems a merely configuration and user problems but
-nevertheless there are the most annoying ones and reponsible for many
+nevertheless there are the most annoying ones and responsible for many
 gray hairs.  We try to give some guidelines here on how to identify and
 solve the problem at hand.
 
 
 @menu
-* Debugging Tools::       Description of some useful tools
+* Debugging Tools::       Description of some useful tools.
+* Debugging Hints::       Various hints on debugging.
 * Common Problems::       Commonly seen problems.
 * Architecture Details::  How the whole thing works internally.
 @end menu
@@ -35,7 +36,7 @@ and solving problems.
 @node kbxutil
 @subsection Scrutinizing a keybox file
 
-A keybox is a file fomat used to store public keys along with meta
+A keybox is a file format used to store public keys along with meta
 information and indices.  The commonly used one is the file
 @file{pubring.kbx} in the @file{.gnupg} directory. It contains all
 X.509 certificates as well as OpenPGP keys@footnote{Well, OpenPGP keys
@@ -71,10 +72,10 @@ Total number of blobs:       99
 @end example
 
 In this example you see that the keybox does not have any OpenPGP keys
-but contains 98 X.509 cerificates and a total of 17 keys or certificates
-are flagges as ephemeral, meaning that they are only temporary stored
+but contains 98 X.509 certificates and a total of 17 keys or certificates
+are flagged as ephemeral, meaning that they are only temporary stored
 (cached) in the keybox and won't get listed using the usual commands
-provided by @command{gpgsm} or @command{gpg}. 81 certifcates are stored
+provided by @command{gpgsm} or @command{gpg}. 81 certificates are stored
 in a standard way and directly available from @command{gpgsm}.
 
 @noindent
@@ -84,8 +85,26 @@ should not occur but sometimes things go wrong), run it using
 @samp{kbxutil --find-dups ~/.gnupg/pubring.kbx}
 
 
+@node Debugging Hints
+@section Various hints on debugging.
 
+@itemize @bullet
+
+@item How to find the IP address of a keyserver
+
+If a round robin URL of is used for a keyserver
+(e.g. subkeys.gnupg.org); it is not easy to see what server is actually
+used.  Using the keyserver debug option as in
+
+@smallexample
+ gpg --keyserver-options debug=1 -v --refresh-key 1E42B367
+@end smallexample
 
+is thus often helpful.  Note that the actual output depends on the
+backend and may change from release to release.
+
+
+@end itemize
 
 
 @node Common Problems
@@ -118,7 +137,7 @@ on how to do it.
 SSH has no way to tell the gpg-agent what terminal or X display it is
 running on.  So when remotely logging into a box where a gpg-agent with
 SSH support is running, the pinentry will get popped up on whatever
-display t he gpg-agent has been started.  To solve this problem you may
+display the gpg-agent has been started.  To solve this problem you may
 issue the command
 
 @smallexample
@@ -152,7 +171,7 @@ Pick the key which best matches the creation time and run the command
   /usr/local/libexec/gpg-protect-tool --p12-export ~/.gnupg/private-keys-v1.d/@var{foo} >@var{foo}.p12
 @end smallexample
 
-(Please adjust the path to @command{gpg-protect-tool} to the approriate
+(Please adjust the path to @command{gpg-protect-tool} to the appropriate
 location). @var{foo} is the name of the key file you picked (it should
 have the suffix @file{.key}).  A Pinentry box will pop up and ask you
 for the current passphrase of the key and a new passphrase to protect it
@@ -175,14 +194,48 @@ or other purposes and don't have a corresponding certificate.
 @item A root certificate does not verify
 
 A common problem is that the root certificate misses the required
-basicConstrains attribute and thus @command{gpgsm} rejects this
+basicConstraints attribute and thus @command{gpgsm} rejects this
 certificate.  An error message indicating ``no value'' is a sign for
 such a certificate.  You may use the @code{relax} flag in
 @file{trustlist.txt} to accept the certificate anyway.  Note that the
 fingerprint and this flag may only be added manually to
 @file{trustlist.txt}.
 
+@item Error message: ``digest algorithm N has not been enabled''
+
+The signature is broken.  You may try the option
+@option{--extra-digest-algo SHA256} to workaround the problem.  The
+number N is the internal algorithm identifier; for example 8 refers to
+SHA-256.
+
+
+@item The Windows version does not work under Wine
+
+When running the W32 version of @command{gpg} under Wine you may get
+an error messages like:
+
+@smallexample
+gpg: fatal: WriteConsole failed: Access denied
+@end smallexample
+
+@noindent
+The solution is to use the command @command{wineconsole}. 
+
+Some operations like gen-key really want to talk to the console directly
+for increased security (for example to prevent the passphrase from
+appearing on the screen).  So, you should use @command{wineconsole}
+instead of @command{wine}, which will launch a windows console that
+implements those additional features.
+
+
+@item Why does GPG's --search-key list weird keys?
 
+For performance reasons the keyservers do not check the keys the same
+way @command{gpg} does.  It may happen that the listing of keys
+available on the keyservers shows keys with wrong user IDs or with user
+Ids from other keys.  If you try to import this key, the bad keys or bad
+user ids won't get imported, though.  This is a bit unfortunate but we
+can't do anything about it without actually downloading the keys.
 
 @end itemize