* cardglue.c (pin_cb): Disable debug output.
[gnupg.git] / doc / gpg.sgml
index ed5deaf..805f4f8 100644 (file)
@@ -1,6 +1,6 @@
 <!-- gpg.sgml - the man page for GnuPG
     Copyright (C) 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003,
-                  2004 Free Software Foundation, Inc.
+                  2004, 2005 Free Software Foundation, Inc.
 
     This file is part of GnuPG.
 
 <!entity ParmName  "<parameter>name</parameter>">
 <!entity OptParmName  "<optional>&ParmName;</optional>">
 <!entity ParmKeyIDs "<parameter>key IDs</parameter>">
+<!entity OptParmKeyIDs "<optional>&ParmKeyIDs</optional>">
 <!entity ParmN     "<parameter>n</parameter>">
 <!entity ParmFlags  "<parameter>flags</parameter>">
 <!entity ParmString "<parameter>string</parameter>">
 <!entity ParmValue  "<parameter>value</parameter>">
 <!entity ParmNameValue "<parameter>name=value</parameter>">
 <!entity ParmNameValues        "<parameter>name=value1 <optional>value2 value3 ...</optional></parameter>">
+<!entity OptEqualsValue        "<optional>=value</optional>">
 ]>
 
 <refentry id="gpg">
@@ -87,6 +89,14 @@ special option "--".
 
 <refsect1>
 <title>COMMANDS</title>
+
+<para>
+<command/gpg/ may be run with no commands, in which case it will
+perform a reasonable action depending on the type of file it is given
+as input (an encrypted message is decrypted, a signature is verified,
+a file containing keys is listed).
+</para>
+
 <para>
 <command/gpg/ recognizes these commands:
 </para>
@@ -183,28 +193,32 @@ material from stdin without denoting it in the above way.
 </para></listitem></varlistentry>
 
 <varlistentry>
+<term>--multifile</term>
+<listitem><para>
+This modifies certain other commands to accept multiple files for
+processing on the command line or read from stdin with each filename
+on a separate line.  This allows for many files to be processed at
+once.  --multifile may currently be used along with --verify,
+--encrypt, and --decrypt.  Note that `--multifile --verify' may not be
+used with detached signatures.
+</para></listitem></varlistentry>
+
+<varlistentry>
 <term>--verify-files <optional><parameter/files/</optional></term>
 <listitem><para>
-This is a special version of the --verify command which does not work with
-detached signatures.  The command expects the files to be verified either
-on the command line or reads the filenames from stdin;  each name must be on
-separate line. The command is intended for quick checking of many files.
+Identical to `--multifile --verify'.
 </para></listitem></varlistentry>
 
 <varlistentry>
 <term>--encrypt-files <optional><parameter/files/</optional></term>
 <listitem><para>
-This is a special version of the --encrypt command. The command expects
-the files to be encrypted either on the command line or reads the filenames
-from stdin; each name must be on separate line. The command is intended
-for a quick encryption of multiple files.
+Identical to `--multifile --encrypt'.
 </para></listitem></varlistentry>
 
 <varlistentry>
 <term>--decrypt-files <optional><parameter/files/</optional></term>
 <listitem><para>
-The same as --encrypt-files with the difference that files will be
-decrypted. The syntax of the filenames is the same.
+Identical to `--multifile --decrypt'.
 </para></listitem></varlistentry>
 
 <!--
@@ -238,7 +252,7 @@ scripts and other programs.
 
 
 <varlistentry>
-<term>--list-secret-keys &OptParmNames;</term>
+<term>-K, --list-secret-keys &OptParmNames;</term>
 <listitem><para>
 List all keys from the secret keyrings, or just the ones given on the
 command line.  A '#' after the letters 'sec' means that the secret key
@@ -255,14 +269,14 @@ Same as --list-keys, but the signatures are listed too.
 For each signature listed, there are several flags in between the
 "sig" tag and keyid.  These flags give additional information about
 each signature.  From left to right, they are the numbers 1-3 for
-certificate check level (see --default-cert-check-level), "L" for a
-local or non-exportable signature (see --lsign-key), "R" for a
-nonRevocable signature (see --nrsign-key), "P" for a signature that
-contains a policy URL (see --cert-policy-url), "N" for a signature
-that contains a notation (see --cert-notation), "X" for an eXpired
-signature (see --ask-cert-expire), and the numbers 1-9 or "T" for 10
-and above to indicate trust signature levels (see the --edit-key
-command "tsign").
+certificate check level (see --ask-cert-level), "L" for a local or
+non-exportable signature (see --lsign-key), "R" for a nonRevocable
+signature (see the --edit-key command "nrsign"), "P" for a signature
+that contains a policy URL (see --cert-policy-url), "N" for a
+signature that contains a notation (see --cert-notation), "X" for an
+eXpired signature (see --ask-cert-expire), and the numbers 1-9 or "T"
+for 10 and above to indicate trust signature levels (see the
+--edit-key command "tsign").
 </para></listitem></varlistentry>
 
 
@@ -315,33 +329,24 @@ related tasks:</para>
     <varlistentry>
     <term>sign</term>
     <listitem><para>
-Make a signature on key of user &ParmName;
-If the key is not yet signed by the default
-user (or the users given with -u), the
-program displays the information of the key
-again, together with its fingerprint and
-asks whether it should be signed. This
-question is repeated for all users specified
-with -u.</para></listitem></varlistentry>
+Make a signature on key of user &ParmName; If the key is not yet
+signed by the default user (or the users given with -u), the program
+displays the information of the key again, together with its
+fingerprint and asks whether it should be signed. This question is
+repeated for all users specified with
+-u.</para></listitem></varlistentry>
     <varlistentry>
     <term>lsign</term>
     <listitem><para>
-Same as --sign but the signature is marked as
-non-exportable and will therefore never be used
-by others.  This may be used to make keys valid
-only in the local environment.</para></listitem></varlistentry>
+Same as "sign" but the signature is marked as non-exportable and will
+therefore never be used by others.  This may be used to make keys
+valid only in the local environment.</para></listitem></varlistentry>
     <varlistentry>
     <term>nrsign</term>
     <listitem><para>
-Same as --sign but the signature is marked as non-revocable and can
+Same as "sign" but the signature is marked as non-revocable and can
 therefore never be revoked.</para></listitem></varlistentry>
     <varlistentry>
-    <term>nrlsign</term>
-    <listitem><para>
-Combines the functionality of nrsign and lsign to make a signature
-that is both non-revocable and
-non-exportable.</para></listitem></varlistentry>
-    <varlistentry>
     <term>tsign</term>
     <listitem><para>
 Make a trust signature.  This is a signature that combines the notions
@@ -349,6 +354,15 @@ of certification (like a regular signature), and trust (like the
 "trust" command).  It is generally only useful in distinct communities
 or groups.
 </para></listitem></varlistentry>
+</variablelist>
+
+<para>
+Note that "l" (for local / non-exportable), "nr" (for non-revocable,
+and "t" (for trust) may be freely mixed and prefixed to "sign" to
+create a signature of any type desired.
+</para>
+
+<variablelist>
     <varlistentry>
     <term>revsig</term>
     <listitem><para>
@@ -375,14 +389,20 @@ Create an alternate user id.</para></listitem></varlistentry>
     <term>addphoto</term>
     <listitem><para>
 Create a photographic user id.  This will prompt for a JPEG file that
-will be embedded into the user ID.  A very large JPEG will make for a
-very large key.
+will be embedded into the user ID.  Note that a very large JPEG will
+make for a very large key.  Also note that some programs will display
+your JPEG unchanged (GnuPG), and some programs will scale it to fit in
+a dialog box (PGP).
 </para></listitem></varlistentry>
     <varlistentry>
     <term>deluid</term>
     <listitem><para>
 Delete a user id.</para></listitem></varlistentry>
     <varlistentry>
+    <term>delsig</term>
+    <listitem><para>
+Delete a signature.</para></listitem></varlistentry>
+    <varlistentry>
     <term>revuid</term>
     <listitem><para>
 Revoke a user id.</para></listitem></varlistentry>
@@ -391,6 +411,34 @@ Revoke a user id.</para></listitem></varlistentry>
     <listitem><para>
 Add a subkey to this key.</para></listitem></varlistentry>
     <varlistentry>
+    <term>addcardkey</term>
+    <listitem><para>
+Generate a key on a card and add it 
+to this key.</para></listitem></varlistentry>
+    <varlistentry>
+    <term>keytocard</term>
+    <listitem><para>
+Transfer the selected secret key (or the primary key if no key has
+been selected) to a smartcard.  The secret key in the keyring will be
+replaced by a stub if the key could be stored successfully on the card
+and you use the save command later.  Only certain key types may be
+transferred to the card.  A sub menu allows you to select on what card
+to store the key.  Note that it is not possible to get that key back
+from the card - if the card gets broken your secret key will be lost
+unless you have a backup somewhere.</para></listitem></varlistentry>
+    <varlistentry>
+    <term>bkuptocard &ParmFile;</term>
+    <listitem><para>
+Restore the given file to a card. This command
+may be used to restore a backup key (as generated during card
+initialization) to a new card.  In almost all cases this will be the
+encryption key. You should use this command only
+with the corresponding public key and make sure that the file
+given as argument is indeed the backup to restore.  You should
+then select 2 to restore as encryption key.
+You will first be asked to enter the passphrase of the backup key and
+then for the Admin PIN of the card.</para></listitem></varlistentry>
+    <varlistentry>
     <term>delkey</term>
     <listitem><para>
 Remove a subkey.</para></listitem></varlistentry>
@@ -464,8 +512,8 @@ are not already included in the preference list.
     <listitem><para>
 Set the list of user ID preferences to &ParmString;, this should be a
 string similar to the one printed by "pref".  Using an empty string
-will set the default preference string, using "none" will set the
-preferences to nil.  Use "gpg --version" to get a list of available
+will set the default preference string, using "none" will remove the
+preferences.  Use "gpg --version" to get a list of available
 algorithms.  This command just initializes an internal list and does
 not change anything unless another command (such as "updpref") which
 changes the self-signatures is used.
@@ -481,6 +529,16 @@ GnuPG does not select keys via attribute user IDs so these preferences
 will not be used by GnuPG.
 </para></listitem></varlistentry>
     <varlistentry>
+    <term>keyserver</term>
+    <listitem><para>
+Set a preferred keyserver for the specified user ID(s).  This allows
+other users to know where you prefer they get your key from.  See
+--keyserver-option honor-keyserver-url for more on how this works.
+Note that some versions of PGP interpret the presence of a keyserver
+URL as an instruction to enable PGP/MIME mail encoding.  Setting a
+value of "none" removes a existing preferred keyserver.
+</para></listitem></varlistentry>
+    <varlistentry>
     <term>toggle</term>
     <listitem><para>
 Toggle between public and secret key listing.</para></listitem></varlistentry>
@@ -529,13 +587,6 @@ from --edit.
 </para></listitem></varlistentry>
 
 <varlistentry>
-<term>--nrsign-key &ParmName;</term>
-<listitem><para>
-Signs a public key with your secret key but marks it as non-revocable.
-This is a shortcut version of the subcommand "nrsign" from --edit.
-</para></listitem></varlistentry>
-
-<varlistentry>
 <term>--delete-key &ParmName;</term>
 <listitem><para>
 Remove key from the public keyring.  In batch mode either --yes is
@@ -620,8 +671,9 @@ keyring.  The fast version is currently just a synonym.
 </para>
 <para>
 There are a few other options which control how this command works.
-Most notable here is the --merge-only option which does not insert new keys
-but does only the merging of new signatures, user-IDs and subkeys.
+Most notable here is the --keyserver-option merge-only option which
+does not insert new keys but does only the merging of new signatures,
+user-IDs and subkeys.
 </para></listitem></varlistentry>
 
 
@@ -633,12 +685,14 @@ Import the keys with the given key IDs from a keyserver. Option
 </para></listitem></varlistentry>
 
 <varlistentry>
-<term>--refresh-keys &ParmKeyIDs;</term>
+<term>--refresh-keys &OptParmKeyIDs;</term>
 <listitem><para>
 Request updates from a keyserver for keys that already exist on the
 local keyring.  This is useful for updating a key with the latest
-signatures, user IDs, etc.  Option --keyserver must be used to give
-the name of this keyserver.
+signatures, user IDs, etc.  Calling this with no arguments will
+refresh the entire keyring.  Option --keyserver must be used to give
+the name of the keyserver for all keys that do not have preferred
+keyservers set (see --keyserver-option honor-keyserver-url).
 </para></listitem></varlistentry>
 
 <varlistentry>
@@ -653,7 +707,7 @@ Option --keyserver must be used to give the name of this keyserver.
 <term>--update-trustdb</term>
 <listitem><para>
 Do trust database maintenance.  This command iterates over all keys
-and builds the Web-of-Trust. This is an interactive command because it
+and builds the Web of Trust. This is an interactive command because it
 may have to ask for the "ownertrust" values for keys.  The user has to
 give an estimation of how far she trusts the owner of the displayed
 key to correctly certify (sign) other keys.  GnuPG only asks for the
@@ -666,7 +720,7 @@ ownertrust value if it has not yet been assigned to a key.  Using the
 <listitem><para>
 Do trust database maintenance without user interaction.  From time to
 time the trust database must be updated so that expired keys or
-signatures and the resulting changes in the Web-of-Trust can be
+signatures and the resulting changes in the Web of Trust can be
 tracked.  Normally, GnuPG will calculate when this is required and do
 it automatically unless --no-auto-check-trustdb is set.  This command
 can be used to force a trust database check at any time.  The
@@ -792,6 +846,19 @@ Write output to &ParmFile;.
 
 
 <varlistentry>
+<term>--max-output &ParmN;</term>
+<listitem><para>
+This option sets a limit on the number of bytes that will be generated
+when processing a file.  Since OpenPGP supports various levels of
+compression, it is possible that the plaintext of a given message may
+be significantly larger than the original OpenPGP message.  While
+GnuPG works properly with such messages, there is often a desire to
+set a maximum file size that will be generated before processing is
+forced to stop by the OS limits.  Defaults to 0, which means "no
+limit".
+</para></listitem></varlistentry>
+
+<varlistentry>
 <term>--mangle-dos-filenames</term>
 <term>--no-mangle-dos-filenames</term>
 <listitem><para>
@@ -805,21 +872,18 @@ option is off by default and has no effect on non-Windows platforms.
 <varlistentry>
 <term>-u, --local-user &ParmName;</term>
 <listitem><para>
-Use &ParmName; as the user ID to sign with.  This option is silently
-ignored for the list commands, so that it can be used in an options
-file.
+Use &ParmName; as the key to sign with.  Note that this option
+overrides --default-key.
 </para></listitem></varlistentry>
 
-
 <varlistentry>
 <term>--default-key &ParmName;</term>
 <listitem><para>
-Use &ParmName; as default user ID for signatures.  If this
-is not used the default user ID is the first user ID
-found in the secret keyring.
+Use &ParmName; as the default key to sign with.  If this option is not
+used, the default key is the first key found in the secret keyring.
+Note that -u or --local-user overrides this option.
 </para></listitem></varlistentry>
 
-
 <varlistentry>
 <term>-r, --recipient &ParmName;</term>
 <term></term>
@@ -921,8 +985,9 @@ significant amount of memory for each additional compression level.
 -z sets both.  A value of 0 for &ParmN; disables compression.
 </para></listitem></varlistentry>
 
+
 <varlistentry>
-<term>--bzip2-compress-lowmem</term>
+<term>--bzip2-decompress-lowmem</term>
 <listitem><para>
 Use a different decompression method for BZIP2 compressed files.  This
 alternate method uses a bit more than half the memory, but also runs
@@ -995,11 +1060,24 @@ Assume "yes" on most questions.
 <varlistentry>
 <term>--no</term>
 <listitem><para>
- Assume "no" on most questions.
+Assume "no" on most questions.
 </para></listitem></varlistentry>
 
+
 <varlistentry>
-<term>--default-cert-check-level &ParmN;</term>
+<term>--ask-cert-level</term>
+<term>--no-ask-cert-level</term>
+<listitem><para>
+When making a key signature, prompt for a certification level.  If
+this option is not specified, the certification level used is set via
+--default-cert-level.  See --default-cert-level for information on the
+specific levels and how they are used. --no-ask-cert-level disables
+this option.  This option defaults to no.
+</para></listitem></varlistentry>
+
+
+<varlistentry>
+<term>--default-cert-level &ParmN;</term>
 <listitem><para>
 The default to use for the check level when signing a key.
 </para><para>
@@ -1027,10 +1105,19 @@ Note that the examples given above for levels 2 and 3 are just that:
 examples.  In the end, it is up to you to decide just what "casual"
 and "extensive" mean to you.
 </para><para>
-This option defaults to 0.
+This option defaults to 0 (no particular claim).
 </para></listitem></varlistentry>
 
 
+<varlistentry>
+<term>--min-cert-level</term>
+<listitem><para>
+When building the trust database, disregard any signatures with a
+certification level below this.  Defaults to 2, which disregards level
+1 signatures.  Note that level 0 "no particular claim" signatures are
+always accepted.
+</para></listitem></varlistentry>
+
 
 <varlistentry>
 <term>--trusted-key <parameter>long key ID</parameter></term>
@@ -1052,12 +1139,17 @@ Set what trust model GnuPG should follow.  The models are:
 <variablelist>
 
 <varlistentry><term>pgp</term><listitem><para>
-This is the web-of-trust combined with trust signatures as used in PGP
+This is the Web of Trust combined with trust signatures as used in PGP
 5.x and later.  This is the default trust model.
 </para></listitem></varlistentry>
 
 <varlistentry><term>classic</term><listitem><para>
-This is the standard web-of-trust as used in PGP 2.x and earlier.
+This is the standard Web of Trust as used in PGP 2.x and earlier.
+</para></listitem></varlistentry>
+
+<varlistentry><term>direct</term><listitem><para>
+Key validity is set directly by the user and not calculated via the
+Web of Trust.
 </para></listitem></varlistentry>
 
 <varlistentry><term>always</term><listitem><para>
@@ -1078,6 +1170,16 @@ Identical to `--trust-model always'.  This option is deprecated.
 
 
 <varlistentry>
+<term>--keyid-format <parameter>short|0xshort|long|0xlong</parameter></term>
+<listitem><para>
+Select how to display key IDs.  "short" is the traditional 8-character
+key ID.  "long" is the more accurate (but less convenient)
+16-character key ID.  Add an "0x" to either to include an "0x" at the
+beginning of the key ID, as in 0x99242560.
+</para></listitem></varlistentry>
+
+
+<varlistentry>
 <term>--keyserver &ParmName;</term>
 <listitem><para>
 Use &ParmName; as your keyserver.  This is the server that
@@ -1111,9 +1213,12 @@ keyserver types, some common options are:
 <term>include-revoked</term>
 <listitem><para>
 When searching for a key with --search-keys, include keys that are
-marked on the keyserver as revoked.  Note that this option is always
-set when using the NAI HKP keyserver, as this keyserver does not
-differentiate between revoked and unrevoked keys.
+marked on the keyserver as revoked.  Note that not all keyservers
+differentiate between revoked and unrevoked keys, and for such
+keyservers this option is meaningless.  Note also that most keyservers
+do not have cryptographic verification of key revocations, and so
+turning this option off may result in skipping keys that are
+incorrectly marked as revoked.  Defaults to on.
 </para></listitem></varlistentry>
 
 <varlistentry>
@@ -1125,6 +1230,14 @@ used with HKP keyservers.
 </para></listitem></varlistentry>
 
 <varlistentry>
+<term>honor-keyserver-url</term>
+<listitem><para>
+When using --refresh-keys, if the key in question has a preferred
+keyserver set, then use that preferred keyserver to refresh the key
+from.  Defaults to yes.
+</para></listitem></varlistentry>
+
+<varlistentry>
 <term>include-subkeys</term>
 <listitem><para>
 When receiving a key, include subkeys as potential targets.  Note that
@@ -1157,10 +1270,23 @@ be repeated multiple times to increase the verbosity level.
 </para></listitem></varlistentry>
 
 <varlistentry>
-<term>honor-http-proxy</term>
+<term>timeout</term>
 <listitem><para>
-For keyserver schemes that use HTTP (such as HKP), try to access the
-keyserver over the proxy set with the environment variable
+Tell the keyserver helper program how long (in seconds) to try and
+perform a keyserver action before giving up.  Note that performing
+multiple actions at the same time uses this timeout value per action.
+For example, when retrieving multiple keys via --recv-keys, the
+timeout applies separately to each key retrieval, and not to the
+--recv-keys command as a whole.  Defaults to 30 seconds.
+</para></listitem></varlistentry>
+
+<varlistentry>
+<term>http-proxy&OptEqualsValue;</term>
+<listitem><para>
+For HTTP-like keyserver schemes that (such as HKP and HTTP itself),
+try to access the keyserver over a proxy.  If a &ParmValue; is
+specified, use this as the HTTP proxy.  If no &ParmValue; is
+specified, try to use the value of the environment variable
 "http_proxy".
 </para></listitem></varlistentry>
 
@@ -1190,7 +1316,7 @@ opposite meaning.  The options are:
 <variablelist>
 
 <varlistentry>
-<term>allow-local-sigs</term>
+<term>import-local-sigs</term>
 <listitem><para>
 Allow importing key signatures marked as "local".  This is not
 generally useful unless a shared keyring scheme is being used.
@@ -1208,6 +1334,13 @@ give you back one subkey.  Defaults to no for regular --import and to
 yes for keyserver --recv-keys.
 </para></listitem></varlistentry>
 
+<varlistentry>
+<term>merge-only</term>
+<listitem><para>
+During import, allow key updates to existing keys, but do not allow
+any new keys to be imported.  Defaults to no.
+</para></listitem></varlistentry>
+
 </variablelist>
 </para></listitem></varlistentry>
 
@@ -1220,13 +1353,7 @@ opposite meaning.  The options are:
 <variablelist>
 
 <varlistentry>
-<term>include-non-rfc</term>
-<listitem><para>
-Include non-RFC compliant keys in the export.  Defaults to yes.
-</para></listitem></varlistentry>
-
-<varlistentry>
-<term>include-local-sigs</term>
+<term>export-local-sigs</term>
 <listitem><para>
 Allow exporting key signatures marked as "local".  This is not
 generally useful unless a shared keyring scheme is being used.
@@ -1234,7 +1361,7 @@ Defaults to no.
 </para></listitem></varlistentry>
 
 <varlistentry>
-<term>include-attributes</term>
+<term>export-attributes</term>
 <listitem><para>
 Include attribute user IDs (photo IDs) while exporting.  This is
 useful to export keys if they are going to be used by an OpenPGP
@@ -1242,12 +1369,19 @@ program that does not accept attribute user IDs.  Defaults to yes.
 </para></listitem></varlistentry>
 
 <varlistentry>
-<term>include-sensitive-revkeys</term>
+<term>export-sensitive-revkeys</term>
 <listitem><para>
 Include designated revoker information that was marked as
 "sensitive".  Defaults to no.
 </para></listitem></varlistentry>
 
+<varlistentry>
+<term>export-minimal</term>
+<listitem><para>
+Export the smallest key possible.  Currently this is done by leaving
+out any signatures that are not self-signatures.  Defaults to no.
+</para></listitem></varlistentry>
+
 </variablelist>
 </para></listitem></varlistentry>
 
@@ -1278,9 +1412,11 @@ Defaults to no.
 
 <varlistentry>
 <term>show-notations</term>
+<term>show-std-notations</term>
+<term>show-user-notations</term>
 <listitem><para>
-Show signature notations in the --list-sigs or --check-sigs listings.
-Defaults to no.
+Show all, IETF standard, or user-defined signature notations in the
+--list-sigs or --check-sigs listings.  Defaults to no.
 </para></listitem></varlistentry>
 
 <varlistentry>
@@ -1291,23 +1427,22 @@ listings.  Defaults to no.
 </para></listitem></varlistentry>
 
 <varlistentry>
-<term>show-validity</term>
+<term>show-uid-validity</term>
 <listitem><para>
-Display the calculated validity of keys and user IDs during key
-listings.  Defaults to no.
+Display the calculated validity of user IDs during key listings.
+Defaults to no.
 </para></listitem></varlistentry>
 
 <varlistentry>
-<term>show-long-keyids</term>
+<term>show-unusable-uids</term>
 <listitem><para>
-Display all 64 bits (16 digits) of key IDs during key listings, rather
-than the more common 32 bit (8 digit) IDs.  Defaults to no.
+Show revoked and expired user IDs in key listings.  Defaults to no.
 </para></listitem></varlistentry>
 
 <varlistentry>
-<term>show-unusable-uids</term>
+<term>show-unusable-subkeys</term>
 <listitem><para>
-Show revoked and expired user IDs in key listings.  Defaults to no.
+Show revoked and expired subkeys in key listings.  Defaults to no.
 </para></listitem></varlistentry>
 
 <varlistentry>
@@ -1324,6 +1459,16 @@ Show signature expiration dates (if any) during --list-sigs or
 --check-sigs listings.  Defaults to no.
 </para></listitem></varlistentry>
 
+<varlistentry>
+<term>show-sig-subpackets</term>
+<listitem><para>
+Include signature subpackets in the key listing.  This option can take
+an optional argument list of the subpackets to list.  If no argument
+is passed, list all subpackets.  Defaults to no.  This option is only
+meaningful when using --with-colons along with --list-sigs or
+--check-sigs.
+</para></listitem></varlistentry>
+
 </variablelist>
 </para></listitem></varlistentry>
 
@@ -1350,9 +1495,11 @@ Show policy URLs in the signature being verified.  Defaults to no.
 
 <varlistentry>
 <term>show-notations</term>
+<term>show-std-notations</term>
+<term>show-user-notations</term>
 <listitem><para>
-Show signature notations in the signature being verified.  Defaults to
-no.
+Show all, IETF standard, or user-defined signature notations in the
+signature being verified.  Defaults to IETF standard.
 </para></listitem></varlistentry>
 
 <varlistentry>
@@ -1363,21 +1510,13 @@ Defaults to no.
 </para></listitem></varlistentry>
 
 <varlistentry>
-<term>show-validity</term>
+<term>show-uid-validity</term>
 <listitem><para>
 Display the calculated validity of the user IDs on the key that issued
 the signature.  Defaults to no.
 </para></listitem></varlistentry>
 
 <varlistentry>
-<term>show-long-keyids</term>
-<listitem><para>
-Display all 64 bits (16 digits) of key IDs during signature
-verification, rather than the more common 32 bit (8 digit) IDs.
-Defaults to no.
-</para></listitem></varlistentry>
-
-<varlistentry>
 <term>show-unusable-uids</term>
 <listitem><para>
 Show revoked and expired user IDs during signature verification.
@@ -1483,13 +1622,13 @@ $GNUPGHOME.
 
 
 <varlistentry>
-<term>--charset &ParmName;</term>
+<term>--display-charset &ParmName;</term>
 <listitem><para>
 Set the name of the native character set.  This is used to convert
-some strings to proper UTF-8 encoding. If this option is not used, the
-default character set is determined from the current locale.  A
-verbosity level of 3 shows the used one.  Valid values for &ParmName;
-are:</para>
+some informational strings like user IDs to the proper UTF-8
+encoding. If this option is not used, the default character set is
+determined from the current locale.  A verbosity level of 3 shows the
+chosen set.  Valid values for &ParmName; are:</para>
 <variablelist>
 <varlistentry>
 <term>iso-8859-1</term><listitem><para>This is the Latin 1 set.</para></listitem>
@@ -1516,11 +1655,11 @@ that the OS uses native UTF-8 encoding.</para></listitem>
 <term>--utf8-strings</term>
 <term>--no-utf8-strings</term>
 <listitem><para>
-Assume that the arguments are already given as UTF8 strings.  The default
-(--no-utf8-strings)
-is to assume that arguments are encoded in the character set as specified
-by --charset. These options affect all following arguments.  Both options may
-be used multiple times.
+Assume that command line arguments are given as UTF8 strings.  The
+default (--no-utf8-strings) is to assume that arguments are encoded in
+the character set as specified by --display-charset. These options
+affect all following arguments.  Both options may be used multiple
+times.
 </para></listitem></varlistentry>
 
 
@@ -1568,6 +1707,13 @@ be given in C syntax (e.g. 0x0042).
  Set all useful debugging flags.
 </para></listitem></varlistentry>
 
+<varlistentry>
+<term>--debug-ccid-driver</term>
+<listitem><para>
+Enable debug output from the included CCID driver for smartcards.
+Note that this option is only available on some system.
+</para></listitem></varlistentry>
+
 
 <varlistentry>
 <term>--enable-progress-filter</term>
@@ -1623,6 +1769,10 @@ Use &ParmString; as a comment string in clear text signatures and
 ASCII armored messages or keys (see --armor).  The default behavior is
 not to use a comment string.  --comment may be repeated multiple times
 to get multiple comment strings.  --no-comments removes all comments.
+It is a good idea to keep the length of a single comment below 60
+characters to avoid problems with mail programs wrapping such lines.
+Note, that those comment lines, like all other header lines, are not
+protected by the signature.
 </para></listitem></varlistentry>
 
 
@@ -1645,9 +1795,9 @@ Put the name value pair into the signature as notation data.
 must contain a '@' character.  This is to help prevent pollution of
 the IETF reserved notation namespace.  The --expert flag overrides the
 '@' check.  &ParmValue; may be any printable string; it will be
-encoded in UTF8, so you should check that your --charset is set
-correctly.  If you prefix &ParmName; with an exclamation mark (!), the
-notation data will be flagged as critical (rfc2440:5.2.3.15).
+encoded in UTF8, so you should check that your --display-charset is
+set correctly.  If you prefix &ParmName; with an exclamation mark (!),
+the notation data will be flagged as critical (rfc2440:5.2.3.15).
 --sig-notation sets a notation for data signatures.  --cert-notation
 sets a notation for key signatures (certifications).  --set-notation
 sets both.
@@ -1661,8 +1811,10 @@ key being signed, "%s" into the key ID of the key making the
 signature, "%S" into the long key ID of the key making the signature,
 "%g" into the fingerprint of the key making the signature (which might
 be a subkey), "%p" into the fingerprint of the primary key of the key
-making the signature, and "%%" results in a single "%".  %k, %K, and
-%f are only meaningful when making a key signature (certification).
+making the signature, "%c" into the signature count from the OpenPGP
+smartcard, and "%%" results in a single "%".  %k, %K, and %f are only
+meaningful when making a key signature (certification), and %c is only
+meaningful when using the OpenPGP smartcard.
 </para>
 
 </listitem></varlistentry>
@@ -1733,9 +1885,10 @@ display the message.  This option overrides --set-filename.
 
 <varlistentry>
 <term>--use-embedded-filename</term>
+<term>--no-use-embedded-filename</term>
 <listitem><para>
-Try to create a file with a name as embedded in the data.
-This can be a dangerous option as it allows to overwrite files.
+Try to create a file with a name as embedded in the data.  This can be
+a dangerous option as it allows to overwrite files.  Defaults to no.
 </para></listitem></varlistentry>
 
 
@@ -1848,14 +2001,14 @@ conventional encryption.
 <term>--simple-sk-checksum</term>
 <listitem><para>
 Secret keys are integrity protected by using a SHA-1 checksum.  This
-method will be part of an enhanced OpenPGP specification but GnuPG
-already uses it as a countermeasure against certain attacks.  Old
-applications don't understand this new format, so this option may be
-used to switch back to the old behaviour.  Using this this option
-bears a security risk.  Note that using this option only takes effect
-when the secret key is encrypted - the simplest way to make this
-happen is to change the passphrase on the key (even changing it to the
-same value is acceptable).
+method is part of the upcoming enhanced OpenPGP specification but
+GnuPG already uses it as a countermeasure against certain attacks.
+Old applications don't understand this new format, so this option may
+be used to switch back to the old behaviour.  Using this option bears
+a security risk.  Note that using this option only takes effect when
+the secret key is encrypted - the simplest way to make this happen is
+to change the passphrase on the key (even changing it to the same
+value is acceptable).
 </para></listitem></varlistentry>
 
 
@@ -1901,25 +2054,21 @@ interaction, this performance penalty does not matter in most settings.
 <term>--auto-check-trustdb</term>
 <term>--no-auto-check-trustdb</term>
 <listitem><para>
-If GnuPG feels that its information about the Web-of-Trust has to be
+If GnuPG feels that its information about the Web of Trust has to be
 updated, it automatically runs the --check-trustdb command internally.
 This may be a time consuming process.  --no-auto-check-trustdb
 disables this option.
 </para></listitem></varlistentry>
 
 <varlistentry>
-<term>--throw-keyid</term>
+<term>--throw-keyids</term>
+<term>--no-throw-keyids</term>
 <listitem><para>
-Do not put the keyids into encrypted packets.  This option hides the
-receiver of the message and is a countermeasure against traffic
-analysis.  It may slow down the decryption process because all
-available secret keys are tried.
-</para></listitem></varlistentry>
-
-<varlistentry>
-<term>--no-throw-keyid</term>
-<listitem><para>
-Resets the --throw-keyid option.
+Do not put the recipient keyid into encrypted packets.  This option
+hides the receiver of the message and is a countermeasure against
+traffic analysis.  It may slow down the decryption process because all
+available secret keys are tried.  --no-throw-keyids disables this
+option.
 </para></listitem></varlistentry>
 
 <varlistentry>
@@ -1934,7 +2083,6 @@ line, patch files don't have this. A special armor header
 line tells GnuPG about this cleartext signature option.
 </para></listitem></varlistentry>
 
-
 <varlistentry>
 <term>--escape-from-lines</term>
 <term>--no-escape-from-lines</term>
@@ -2050,7 +2198,7 @@ Set up all options to be as PGP 6 compliant as possible.  This
 restricts you to the ciphers IDEA (if the IDEA plugin is installed),
 3DES, and CAST5, the hashes MD5, SHA1 and RIPEMD160, and the
 compression algorithms none and ZIP.  This also disables
---throw-keyid, and making signatures with signing subkeys as PGP 6
+--throw-keyids, and making signatures with signing subkeys as PGP 6
 does not understand signatures made by signing subkeys.
 </para><para>
 This option implies `--disable-mdc --no-sk-comment --escape-from-lines
@@ -2071,9 +2219,8 @@ TWOFISH.
 <listitem><para>
 Set up all options to be as PGP 8 compliant as possible.  PGP 8 is a
 lot closer to the OpenPGP standard than previous versions of PGP, so
-all this does is disable --throw-keyid and set --escape-from-lines.
-The allowed algorithms list is the same as --pgp7 with the addition of
-the SHA-256 digest algorithm.
+all this does is disable --throw-keyids and set --escape-from-lines.
+All algorithms are allowed except for the SHA384 and SHA512 digests.
 </para></listitem></varlistentry>
 
 </variablelist></para></listitem></varlistentry>
@@ -2157,10 +2304,10 @@ issues with signatures.
 <term>--ignore-crc-error</term>
 <listitem><para>
 The ASCII armor used by OpenPGP is protected by a CRC checksum against
-transmission errors.  Sometimes it happens that the CRC gets mangled
-somewhere on the transmission channel but the actual content (which is
-protected by the OpenPGP protocol anyway) is still okay.  This option
-will let gpg ignore CRC errors.
+transmission errors.  Occasionally the CRC gets mangled somewhere on
+the transmission channel but the actual content (which is protected by
+the OpenPGP protocol anyway) is still okay.  This option allows GnuPG
+to ignore CRC errors.
 </para></listitem></varlistentry>
 
 <varlistentry>
@@ -2248,6 +2395,13 @@ supressed on the command line.
 Suppress the warning about missing MDC integrity protection.
 </para></listitem></varlistentry>
 
+<varlistentry>
+<term>--require-secmem</term>
+<term>--no-require-secmem</term>
+<listitem><para>
+Refuse to run if GnuPG cannot get secure memory.  Defaults to no
+(i.e. run, but give a warning).
+</para></listitem></varlistentry>
 
 <varlistentry>
 <term>--no-armor</term>
@@ -2280,11 +2434,11 @@ verification is not needed.
 <term>--with-colons</term>
 <listitem><para>
 Print key listings delimited by colons.  Note that the output will be
-encoded in UTF-8 regardless of any --charset setting.  This format is
-useful when GnuPG is called from scripts and other programs as it is
-easily machine parsed.  The details of this format are documented in
-the file doc/DETAILS, which is included in the GnuPG source
-distribution.
+encoded in UTF-8 regardless of any --display-charset setting.  This
+format is useful when GnuPG is called from scripts and other programs
+as it is easily machine parsed.  The details of this format are
+documented in the file doc/DETAILS, which is included in the GnuPG
+source distribution.
 </para></listitem></varlistentry>
 
 
@@ -2340,25 +2494,17 @@ This is not for normal use.  Use the source to see for what it might be useful.
 </para></listitem></varlistentry>
 
 <varlistentry>
-<term>--emulate-md-encode-bug</term>
-<listitem><para>
-GnuPG versions prior to 1.0.2 had a bug in the way a signature was
-encoded.  This options enables a workaround by checking faulty
-signatures again with the encoding used in old versions.  This may
-only happen for Elgamal signatures which are not widely used.
-</para></listitem></varlistentry>
-
-<varlistentry>
 <term>--show-session-key</term>
 <listitem><para>
 Display the session key used for one message. See --override-session-key
 for the counterpart of this option.
 </para>
 <para>
-We think that Key-Escrow is a Bad Thing; however the user should
-have the freedom to decide whether to go to prison or to reveal the content of
-one specific message without compromising all messages ever encrypted for one
-secret key. DON'T USE IT UNLESS YOU ARE REALLY FORCED TO DO SO.
+We think that Key Escrow is a Bad Thing; however the user should have
+the freedom to decide whether to go to prison or to reveal the content
+of one specific message without compromising all messages ever
+encrypted for one secret key. DON'T USE IT UNLESS YOU ARE REALLY
+FORCED TO DO SO.
 </para></listitem></varlistentry>
 
 <varlistentry>
@@ -2395,20 +2541,14 @@ option is not specified, the expiration time is "never".
 <listitem><para>
 Allow the user to do certain nonsensical or "silly" things like
 signing an expired or revoked key, or certain potentially incompatible
-things like generating deprecated key types.  This also disables
-certain warning messages about potentially incompatible actions.  As
-the name implies, this option is for experts only.  If you don't fully
+things like generating unusual key types.  This also disables certain
+warning messages about potentially incompatible actions.  As the name
+implies, this option is for experts only.  If you don't fully
 understand the implications of what it allows you to do, leave this
 off.  --no-expert disables this option.
 </para></listitem></varlistentry>
 
 <varlistentry>
-<term>--merge-only</term>
-<listitem><para>
-Don't insert new keys into the keyrings while doing an import.
-</para></listitem></varlistentry>
-
-<varlistentry>
 <term>--allow-secret-key-import</term>
 <listitem><para>
 This is an obsolete option and is not used anywhere.
@@ -2417,10 +2557,11 @@ This is an obsolete option and is not used anywhere.
 <varlistentry>
 <term>--try-all-secrets</term>
 <listitem><para>
-Don't look at the key ID as stored in the message but try all secret keys in
-turn to find the right decryption key. This option forces the behaviour as
-used by anonymous recipients (created by using --throw-keyid) and might come
-handy in case where an encrypted message contains a bogus key ID.
+Don't look at the key ID as stored in the message but try all secret
+keys in turn to find the right decryption key. This option forces the
+behaviour as used by anonymous recipients (created by using
+--throw-keyids) and might come handy in case where an encrypted
+message contains a bogus key ID.
 </para></listitem></varlistentry>
 
 <varlistentry>
@@ -2524,7 +2665,7 @@ option is intended for external programs that call GnuPG to perform
 tasks, and is thus not generally useful.  See the file
 <filename>doc/DETAILS</filename> in the source distribution for the
 details of which configuration items may be listed.  --list-config is
-only useful with --with-colons set.
+only usable with --with-colons set.
 </para></listitem></varlistentry>
 
 </variablelist>
@@ -2704,6 +2845,14 @@ be used to override it.</para></listitem>
 <listitem><para>Only honored when the keyserver-option
 honor-http-proxy is set.</para></listitem>
 </varlistentry>
+
+<varlistentry>
+<term>COLUMNS</term>
+<term>LINES</term>
+<listitem><para>
+Used to size some displays to the full size of the screen.
+</para></listitem></varlistentry>
+
     </variablelist>
 
 </refsect1>
@@ -2788,8 +2937,8 @@ is *very* easy to spy out your passphrase!
 </para>
 <para>
 If you are going to verify detached signatures, make sure that the
-program knows about it; either be giving both filenames on the
-command line or using <literal>-</literal> to specify stdin.
+program knows about it; either give both filenames on the command line
+or use <literal>-</literal> to specify stdin.
 </para>
 </refsect1>
 
@@ -2797,8 +2946,8 @@ command line or using <literal>-</literal> to specify stdin.
     <title>INTEROPERABILITY WITH OTHER OPENPGP PROGRAMS</title>
 <para>
 GnuPG tries to be a very flexible implementation of the OpenPGP
-standard.  In particular, GnuPG implements many of the "optional"
-parts of the standard, such as the RIPEMD/160 hash, and the ZLIB
+standard.  In particular, GnuPG implements many of the optional parts
+of the standard, such as the SHA-512 hash, and the ZLIB and BZIP2
 compression algorithms.  It is important to be aware that not all
 OpenPGP programs implement these optional algorithms and that by
 forcing their use via the --cipher-algo, --digest-algo,
@@ -2808,14 +2957,15 @@ cannot be read by the intended recipient.
 </para>
 
 <para>
-For example, as of this writing, no (unhacked) version of PGP supports
-the BLOWFISH cipher algorithm.  If you use it, no PGP user will be
-able to decrypt your message.  The same thing applies to the ZLIB
-compression algorithm.  By default, GnuPG uses the standard OpenPGP
-preferences system that will always do the right thing and create
-messages that are usable by all recipients, regardless of which
-OpenPGP program they use.  Only override this safe default if you know
-what you are doing.
+There are dozens of variations of OpenPGP programs available, and each
+supports a slightly different subset of these optional algorithms.
+For example, until recently, no (unhacked) version of PGP supported
+the BLOWFISH cipher algorithm.  A message using BLOWFISH simply could
+not be read by a PGP user.  By default, GnuPG uses the standard
+OpenPGP preferences system that will always do the right thing and
+create messages that are usable by all recipients, regardless of which
+OpenPGP program they use.  Only override this safe default if you
+really know what you are doing.
 </para>
 
 <para>