Add basic implementation of GOST R 34.11-94 message digest
[libgcrypt.git] / README
diff --git a/README b/README
index 5de8def..1778951 100644 (file)
--- a/README
+++ b/README
-                   GnuPG - The GNU Privacy Guard
-                  -------------------------------
-                          Version 0.9.8
-
-    GnuPG is now in Beta test and you should report all bugs to the
-    mailing list (see below).  The 0.9.x versions are released mainly
-    to fix all remaining serious bugs. As soon as version 1.0 is out,
-    development will continue with a 1.1 series and bug fixes for the
-    1.0 version as needed.
-
-    GnuPG works best on GNU/Linux or *BSD.  Other Unices are
-    also supported but are not as well tested as the Free Unices.
-    Please verify the tar file with the PGP2 or OpenPGP
-    signatures provided.  My PGP2 key is well known and published in
-    the "Global Trust Register for 1998", ISBN 0-9532397-0-5.
-
-    I have included my pubring as "g10/pubring.asc", which contains
-    the key used to make GnuPG signatures:
-
-    "pub  1024D/57548DCD 1998-07-07 Werner Koch (gnupg sig) <dd9jn@gnu.org>"
-    "Key fingerprint = 6BD9 050F D8FC 941B 4341  2DCC 68B7 AB89 5754 8DCD"
-
-    You may want to add this DSA key to your GnuPG pubring and use it in
-    the future to verify new releases. Because you verified this README
-    file and _checked_that_it_is_really_my PGP2 key 0C9857A5, you can be
-    quite sure that the above fingerprint is correct.
-
-    Please subscribe to announce@gnupg.org by sending a mail with
-    a subject of "subscribe" to "announce-request@gnupg.org".  If you
-    have problems, please subscribe to "gnupg-users@gnupg.org" by sending
-    mail with the subject "subscribe" to "gnupg-users-request@gnupg.org"
-    and ask there.  The gnupg.org domain is hosted in Germany to avoid
-    possible legal problems (technical advices may count as a violation
-    of ITAR).
-
-    See the file COPYING for copyright and warranty information.
-
-    GnuPG is in compliance with RFC2440 (OpenPGP), see doc/OpenPGP for
-    details.
-
-    Because GnuPG does not use use any patented algorithm it cannot be
-    compatible with PGP2 versions.  PGP 2.x uses only IDEA (which is
-    patented worldwide) and RSA (which is patented in the United States
-    until Sep 20, 2000).
-
-    The default algorithms are DSA and ElGamal.  ElGamal for signing
-    is still available, but because of the larger size of such
-    signatures it is deprecated (Please note that the GnuPG
-    implementation of ElGamal signatures is *not* insecure).  Symmetric
-    algorithms are: 3DES, Blowfish, CAST5 and Twofish (GnuPG does not
-    yet create Twofish encrypted messages because there no agreement
-    in the OpenPG WG on how to use it together with a MDC algorithm)
-    Digest algorithms available are MD5, RIPEMD160, SHA1, and TIGER/192.
-
-
-    Installation
-    ------------
-
-    Please read the file INSTALL!
-
-    Here is a quick summary:
-
-    1) "./configure"
-
-    2) "make"
-
-    3) "make install"
-
-    4) You end up with a "gpg" binary in /usr/local/bin.
-       Note: Because some programs rely on the existence of a
-       binary named "gpgm"; you should install a symbolic link
-       from gpgm to gpg:
-       $ cd /usr/local/bin; ln -s gpg gpgm
-
-    5) To avoid swapping out of sensitive data, you can install "gpg" as
-       suid root.  If you don't do so, you may want to add the option
-       "no-secmem-warning" to ~/.gnupg/options
-
-
-
-    Introduction
-    ------------
-
-    This is a brief overview how to use GnuPG - it is strongly suggested
-    that you read the manual^H^H^H more information about the use of
-    cryptography.  GnuPG is only a tool, secure results require that YOU
-    KNOW WHAT YOU ARE DOING.
-
-    If you already have a DSA key from PGP 5 (they call them DH/ElGamal)
-    you can simply copy the pgp keyrings over the GnuPG keyrings after
-    running gpg once to create the correct directory.
-
-    The normal way to create a key is
-
-       gpg --gen-key
-
-    This asks some questions and then starts key generation. To create
-    good random numbers for the key parameters, GnuPG needs to gather
-    enough noise (entropy) from your system.  If you see no progress
-    during key generation you should start some other activities such
-    as mouse moves or hitting on the CTRL and SHIFT keys.
-
-    Generate a key ONLY on a machine where you have direct physical
-    access - don't do it over the network or on a machine used also
-    by others - especially if you have no access to the root account.
+                   Libgcrypt - The GNU Crypto Library
+                  ------------------------------------
+                             Version 1.6
 
-    When you are asked for a passphrase use a good one which you can
-    easy remember.  Don't make the passphrase too long because you have
-    to type it for every decryption or signing; but, - AND THIS IS VERY
-    IMPORTANT - use a good one that is not easily to guess because the
-    security of the whole system relies on your secret key and the
-    passphrase that protects it when someone gains access to your secret
-    keyring.  A good way to select a passphrase is to figure out a short
-    nonsense sentence which makes some sense for you and modify it by
-    inserting extra spaces, non-letters and changing the case of some
-    characters - this is really easy to remember especially if you
-    associate some pictures with it.
+            !!! THIS IS A DEVELOPMENT VERSION VERSION !!!
 
-    Next, you should create a revocation certificate in case someone
-    gets knowledge of your secret key or you forgot your passphrase
+    Copyright 2000, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2007, 2008, 2009,
+              2011, 2012 Free Software Foundation, Inc.
 
-       gpg --gen-revoke your_user_id
+    This file is free software; as a special exception the author gives
+    unlimited permission to copy and/or distribute it, with or without
+    modifications, as long as this notice is preserved.
 
-    Run this command and store the revocation certificate away.  The output
-    is always ASCII armored, so that you can print it and (hopefully
-    never) re-create it if your electronic media fails.
+    This file is distributed in the hope that it will be useful, but
+    WITHOUT ANY WARRANTY, to the extent permitted by law; without even the
+    implied warranty of MERCHANTABILITY or FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE.
 
-    Now you can use your key to create digital signatures
 
-       gpg -s file
 
-    This creates a file "file.gpg" which is compressed and has a
-    signature attached.
+    Overview
+    --------
 
-       gpg -sa file
+    Libgcrypt is a general purpose crypto library based on the code
+    used in GnuPG.  Libgcrypt depends on the library `libgpg-error',
+    which must be installed correctly before Libgcrypt is to be built.
+    Libgcrypt is distributed under the LGPL, see the section "License"
+    below for details.
 
-    Same as above, but creates a file "file.asc" which is ASCII armored
-    and and ready for sending by mail. It is better to use your
-    mailers features to create signatures (The mailer uses GnuPG to do
-    this) because the mailer has the ability to MIME encode such
-    signatures - but this is not a security issue.
 
-       gpg -s -o out file
+    Build Instructions
+    ------------------
 
-    Creates a signature of "file", but writes the output to the file
-    "out".
+    The download canonical location for libgcrypt is:
 
-    Everyone who knows your public key (you can and should publish
-    your key by putting it on a key server, a web page or in your .plan
-    file) is now able to check whether you really signed this text
+      ftp://ftp.gnupg.org/gcrypt/libgcrypt/
 
-       gpg --verify file
+    To build libgcrypt you need libgpg-error:
 
-    GnuPG now checks whether the signature is valid and prints an
-    appropriate message.  If the signature is good, you know at least
-    that the person (or machine) has access to the secret key which
-    corresponds to the published public key.
+      ftp://ftp.gnupg.org/gcrypt/libgpg-error/
 
-    If you run gpg without an option it will verify the signature and
-    create a new file that is identical to the original.  gpg can also
-    run as a filter, so that you can pipe data to verify trough it
+    You should get the latest versions of course.
 
-       cat signed-file | gpg | wc -l
+    After building and installing the libgpg-error package, you may
+    continue with Libgcrypt installation As with allmost all GNU
+    packages, you just have to do
 
-    which will check the signature of signed-file and then display the
-    number of lines in the original file.
+       ./configure
+       make
+       make check
+       make install
 
-    To send a message encrypted to someone you can use
+    The "make check" is not required but a good idea to see whether
+    the library works as expected.  The check takes some while and
+    prints some benchmarking results.  Before doing "make install" you
+    probably need to become root.
 
-       gpg -e -r heine file
+    To build libgcrypt for Microsoft Windows, you need to have the
+    mingw32 cross-building toolchain installed.  Instead of running a
+    plain configure you use
 
-    This encrypts "file" with the public key of the user "heine" and
-    writes it to "file.gpg"
-
-       echo "hello" | gpg -ea -r heine | mail heine
-
-    Ditto, but encrypts "hello\n" and mails it as ASCII armored message
-    to the user with the mail address heine.
-
-       gpg -se -r heine file
-
-    This encrypts "file" with the public key of "heine" and writes it
-    to "file.gpg" after signing it with your user id.
-
-       gpg -se -r heine -u Suttner file
-
-    Ditto, but sign the file with your alternative user id "Suttner"
-
-
-    GnuPG has some options to help you publish public keys.  This is
-    called "exporting" a key, thus
-
-       gpg --export >all-my-keys
-
-    exports all the keys in the keyring and writes them (in a binary
-    format) to "all-my-keys".  You may then mail "all-my-keys" as an
-    MIME attachment to someone else or put it on an FTP server. To
-    export only some user IDs, you give them as arguments on the command
-    line.
-
-    To mail a public key or put it on a web page you have to create
-    the key in ASCII armored format
-
-       gpg --export --armor | mail panther@tiger.int
-
-    This will send all your public keys to your friend panther.
-
-    If you have received a key from someone else you can put it
-    into your public keyring.  This is called "importing"
-
-       gpg --import [filenames]
-
-    New keys are appended to your keyring and already existing
-    keys are updated. Note that GnuPG does not import keys that
-    are not self-signed.
-
-    Because anyone can claim that a public key belongs to her
-    we must have some way to check that a public key really belongs
-    to the owner.  This can be achieved by comparing the key during
-    a phone call.  Sure, it is not very easy to compare a binary file
-    by reading the complete hex dump of the file - GnuPG (and nearly
-    every other program used for management of cryptographic keys)
-    provides other solutions.
-
-       gpg --fingerprint <username>
-
-    prints the so called "fingerprint" of the given username which
-    is a sequence of hex bytes (which you may have noticed in mail
-    sigs or on business cards) that uniquely identifies the public
-    key - different keys will always have different fingerprints.
-    It is easy to compare fingerprints by phone and I suggest
-    that you print your fingerprint on the back of your business
-    card.  To see the fingerprints of the secondary keys, you can
-    give the command twice; but this is normally not needed.
-
-    If you don't know the owner of the public key you are in trouble.
-    Suppose however that friend of yours knows someone who knows someone
-    who has met the owner of the public key at some computer conference.
-    Suppose that all the people between you and the public key holder
-    may now act as introducers to you. Introducers signing keys thereby
-    certify that they know the owner of the keys they sign.  If you then
-    trust all the introducers to have correctly signed other keys, you
-    can be be sure that the other key really belongs to the one who
-    claims to own it..
-
-    There are 2 steps to validate a key:
-       1. First check that there is a complete chain
-          of signed keys from the public key you want to use
-          and your key and verify each signature.
-       2. Make sure that you have full trust in the certificates
-          of all the introduces between the public key holder and
-          you.
-    Step 2 is the more complicated part because there is no easy way
-    for a computer to decide who is trustworthy and who is not.  GnuPG
-    leaves this decision to you and will ask you for a trust value
-    (here also referenced as the owner-trust of a key) for every key
-    needed to check the chain of certificates. You may choose from:
-      a) "I don't know" - then it is not possible to use any
-        of the chains of certificates, in which this key is used
-        as an introducer, to validate the target key.  Use this if
-        you don't know the introducer.
-      b) "I do not trust" - Use this if you know that the introducer
-        does not do a good job in certifying other keys.  The effect
-        is the same as with a) but for a) you may later want to
-        change the value because you got new information about this
-        introducer.
-      c) "I trust marginally" - Use this if you assume that the
-        introducer knows what he is doing.  Together with some
-        other marginally trusted keys, GnuPG validates the target
-        key then as good.
-      d) "I fully trust" - Use this if you really know that this
-        introducer does a good job when certifying other keys.
-        If all the introducer are of this trust value, GnuPG
-        normally needs only one chain of signatures to validate
-        a target key okay. (But this may be adjusted with the help
-        of some options).
-    This information is confidential because it gives your personal
-    opinion on the trustworthiness of someone else.  Therefore this data
-    is not stored in the keyring but in the "trustdb"
-    (~/.gnupg/trustdb.gpg).  Do not assign a high trust value just
-    because the introducer is a friend of yours - decide how well she
-    understands the implications of key signatures and you may want to
-    tell her more about public key cryptography so you can later change
-    the trust value you assigned.
-
-    Okay, here is how GnuPG helps you with key management.  Most stuff
-    is done with the --edit-key command
-
-       gpg --edit-key <keyid or username>
-
-    GnuPG displays some information about the key and then prompts
-    for a command (enter "help" to see a list of commands and see
-    the man page for a more detailed explanation).  To sign a key
-    you select the user ID you want to sign by entering the number
-    that is displayed in the leftmost column (or do nothing if the
-    key has only one user ID) and then enter the command "sign" and
-    follow all the prompts.  When you are ready, give the command
-    "save" (or use "quit" to cancel your actions).
-
-    If you want to sign the key with another of your user IDs, you
-    must give an "-u" option on the command line together with the
-    "--edit-key".
-
-    Normally you want to sign only one user ID because GnuPG
-    uses only one and this keeps the public key certificate
-    small.  Because such key signatures are very important you
-    should make sure that the signatories of your key sign a user ID
-    which is very likely to stay for a long time - choose one with an
-    email address you have full control of or do not enter an email
-    address at all.  In future GnuPG will have a way to tell which
-    user ID is the one with an email address you prefer - because
-    you have no signatures on this email address it is easy to change
-    this address.  Remember, your signatories sign your public key (the
-    primary one) together with one of your user IDs - so it is not possible
-    to change the user ID later without voiding all the signatures.
-
-    Tip: If you hear about a key signing party on a computer conference
-    join it because this is a very convenient way to get your key
-    certified (But remember that signatures have nothing to to with the
-    trust you assign to a key).
-
-
-    8 Ways to Specify a User ID
-    --------------------------
-    There are several ways to specify a user ID, here are some examples.
-
-    * Only by the short keyid (prepend a zero if it begins with A..F):
-
-       "234567C4"
-       "0F34E556E"
-       "01347A56A"
-       "0xAB123456
-
-    * By a complete keyid:
-
-       "234AABBCC34567C4"
-       "0F323456784E56EAB"
-       "01AB3FED1347A5612"
-       "0x234AABBCC34567C4"
-
-    * By a fingerprint:
-
-       "1234343434343434C434343434343434"
-       "123434343434343C3434343434343734349A3434"
-       "0E12343434343434343434EAB3484343434343434"
-
-      The first one is MD5 the others are ripemd160 or sha1.
-
-    * By an exact string:
-
-       "=Heinrich Heine <heinrichh@uni-duesseldorf.de>"
-
-    * By an email address:
-
-       "<heinrichh@uni-duesseldorf.de>"
-
-    * By word match
+      ./autogen.sh --build-w32
+      make
+      make install
 
-       "+Heinrich Heine duesseldorf"
+    By default this command sequences expectsd a libgpg-error
+    installed below $HOME/w32root and installs libgcrypt to that
+    directory too.  See the autogen.sh code for details.
 
-      All words must match excatly (not case sensitive) and appear in
-      any order in the user ID.  Words are any sequences of letters,
-      digits, the underscore and characters with bit 7 set.
+    The documentation is available as an Info file (gcrypt.info).  To
+    build documentation in PDF, run this:
 
-    * By the Local ID (from the trust DB):
+      cd doc
+      make pdf
 
-       "#34"
 
-      This may be used by a MUA to specify an exact key after selecting
-      a key from GnuPG (by using a special option or an extra utility)
-
-    * Or by the usual substring:
-
-       "Heine"
-       "*Heine"
-
-      The '*' indicates substring search explicitly.
-
-
-    Batch mode
-    ----------
-    If you use the option "--batch", GnuPG runs in non-interactive mode and
-    never prompts for input data.  This does not even allow entering the
-    passphrase.  Until we have a better solution (something like ssh-agent),
-    you can use the option "--passphrase-fd n", which works like PGPs
-    PGPPASSFD.
-
-    Batch mode also causes GnuPG to terminate as soon as a BAD signature is
-    detected.
 
+    Mailing List
+    ------------
 
-    Exit status
-    -----------
-    GnuPG returns with an exit status of 1 if in batch mode and a bad signature
-    has been detected or 2 or higher for all other errors.  You should parse
-    stderr or, better, the output of the fd specified with --status-fd to get
-    detailed information about the errors.
+    You may want to join the developer's mailing list
+    gcrypt-devel@gnupg.org by sending mail with a subject of
+    "subscribe" to gcrypt-devel-request@gnupg.org.  An archive of this
+    list is available at http://lists.gnupg.org .
 
 
-    Esoteric commands
+    Configure options
     -----------------
+    Here is a list of configure options which are sometimes useful
+    for installation.
+
+     --enable-m-guard
+                     Enable the integrated malloc checking code. Please
+                     note that this feature does not work on all CPUs
+                     (e.g. SunOS 5.7 on UltraSparc-2) and might give
+                     you a bus error.
+
+     --disable-asm
+                     Do not use assembler modules.  It is not possible
+                     to use this on some CPU types.
+
+     --enable-ld-version-script
+                     Libgcrypt tries to build a library where internal
+                     symbols are not exported.  This requires support
+                     from ld and is currently enabled for a few OSes.
+                     If you know that your ld supports the so called
+                     ELF version scripts, you can use this option to
+                     force its use.  OTOH, if you get error message
+                     from the linker, you probably want to use this
+                     option to disable the use of version scripts.
+                     Note, that you should never ever use an
+                     undocumented symbol or one which is prefixed with
+                     an underscore.
+
+     --enable-ciphers=list
+     --enable-pubkey-ciphers=list
+     --enable-digests=list
+                     If not otherwise specified, all algorithms
+                     included in the libgcrypt source tree are built.
+                    An exception are algorithms, which depend on
+                    features not provided by the system, like 64bit
+                    data types.  With these switches it is possible
+                     to select exactly those algorithm modules, which
+                    should be built.  The algorithms are to be
+                     separated by spaces, commas or colons.  To view
+                     the list used with the current build the program
+                     tests/version may be used.
+
+     --disable-endian-check
+                     Don't let configure test for the endianness but
+                     try to use the OS provided macros at compile
+                     time.  This is helpful to create OS X fat binaries.
+
+     --enable-random-daemon
+                     Include support for a global random daemon and
+                     build the daemon.  This is an experimental feature.
+
+     --enable-mpi-path=EXTRA_PATH
+                     Prepend EXTRA_PATH to list of CPU specific
+                     optimizations.  For example, if you want to add
+                     optimizations forn a Intel Pentium 4 compatible
+                     CPU, you may use
+                        --enable-mpi-path=pentium4/sse2:pentium4/mmx
+                     Take care: The generated library may crash on
+                     non-compatible CPUs.
+
+     --enable-random=NAME
+                     Force the use of the random gathering module
+                    NAME.  Default is either to use /dev/random or
+                    the auto mode.  Possible values for NAME are:
+                      egd - Use the module which accesses the
+                            Entropy Gathering Daemon. See the webpages
+                            for more information about it.
+                     unix - Use the standard Unix module which does not
+                            have a very good performance.
+                    linux - Use the module which accesses /dev/random.
+                            This is the first choice and the default one
+                            for GNU/Linux or *BSD.
+                      auto - Compile linux, egd and unix in and
+                             automagically select at runtime.
+
+     --enable-hmac-binary-check
+                     Include support to check the binary at runtime
+                     against a HMAC checksum.  This works only in FIPS
+                     mode and on systems providing the dladdr function.
+
+     --disable-padlock-support
+                     Disable support for the PadLock engine of VIA
+                     processors.  The default is to use PadLock if
+                     available.  Try this if you get problems with
+                     assembler code.
+
+     --disable-aesni-support
+                     Disable support for the AES-NI instructions of
+                     newer Intel CPUs.  The default is to use AES-NI
+                     if available.  Try this if you get problems with
+                     assembler code.
+
+     --disable-O-flag-munging
+                     Some code is too complex for some compilers while
+                     in higher optimization modes, thus the compiler
+                     invocation is modified to use a lower
+                     optimization level.  Usually this works very well
+                     but on some platforms these rules break the
+                     invocation.  This option may be used to disable
+                     the feature under the assumption that either good
+                     CFLAGS are given or the compiler can grok the code.
+
+
+
+
+    Build Problems
+    --------------
+
+    We can't check all assembler files, so if you have problems
+    assembling them (or the program crashes) use --disable-asm with
+    ./configure.  If you opt to delete individual replacement files in
+    hopes of using the remaining ones, be aware that the configure
+    scripts may consider several subdirectories to get all available
+    assembler files; be sure to delete the correct ones.  Never delete
+    udiv-qrnnd.S in any CPU directory, because there may be no C
+    substitute (in mpi/genereic).  Don't forget to delete
+    "config.cache" and run "./config.status --recheck".  We got a few
+    reports about problems using versions of gcc earlier than 2.96
+    along with a non-GNU assembler (as).  If this applies to your
+    platform, you can either upgrade gcc to a more recent version, or
+    use the GNU assembler.
+
+    Some make tools are broken - the best solution is to use GNU's
+    make.  Try gmake or grab the sources from a GNU archive and
+    install them.
+
+    Specific problems on some machines:
+
+      * IBM RS/6000 running AIX
+
+       Due to a change in gcc (since version 2.8) the MPI stuff may
+       not build. In this case try to run configure using:
+           CFLAGS="-g -O2 -mcpu=powerpc" ./configure
+
+      * SVR4.2 (ESIX V4.2 cc)
+
+        Due to problems with the ESIX as(1), you probably want to do:
+            CFLAGS="-O -K pentium" ./configure --disable-asm
+
+      * SunOS 4.1.4
+
+         ./configure ac_cv_sys_symbol_underscore=yes
+
+      * Sparc64 CPUs
+
+        We have reports about failures in the AES module when
+        compiling using gcc (e.g. version 4.1.2) and the option -O3;
+        using -O2 solves the problem.
+
+
+    License
+    -------
+
+    The library is distributed under the terms of the GNU Lesser
+    General Public License (LGPL); see the file COPYING.LIB for the
+    actual terms.  The helper programs (e.g. gcryptrnd and getrandom)
+    as well as the documentation are distributed under the terms of
+    the GNU General Public License (GPL); see the file COPYING for the
+    actual terms.
+
+    This library used to be available under the GPL - this was changed
+    with version 1.1.7 with the rationale that there are now many free
+    crypto libraries available and many of them come with capabilities
+    similar to Libcrypt.  We decided that to foster the use of
+    cryptography in Free Software an LGPLed library would make more
+    sense because it avoids problems due to license incompatibilities
+    between some Free Software licenses and the GPL.
+
+    Please note that in many cases it is better for a library to be
+    licensed under the GPL, so that it provides an advantage for free
+    software projects.  The Lesser GPL is so named because it does
+    less to protect the freedom of the users of the code that it
+    covers.  See http://www.gnu.org/philosophy/why-not-lgpl.html for
+    more explanation.
 
-       gpg --list-packets datafile
-
-    Use this to list the contents of a data file. If the file is encrypted
-    you are asked for the passphrase, so that GnuPG is able to look at the
-    inner structure of a encrypted packet.  This command should list all
-    kinds of rfc2440 messages.
-
-       gpgm --list-trustdb
-
-    List the contents of the trust DB in a human readable format
-
-       gpgm --list-trustdb  <usernames>
-
-    List the tree of certificates for the given usernames
-
-       gpgm --list-trust-path  username
-
-    List the possible trust paths for the given username. The length
-    of such a trust path is limited by the option --max-cert-depth
-    which defaults to 5.
-
-    For more options/commands see the man page or use "gpg --help".
-
-
-    Other Notes
-    -----------
-
-    The primary FTP site is "ftp://ftp.gnupg.org/pub/gcrypt/"
-    The primary WWW page is "http://www.gnupg.org"
 
-    See http://www.gnupg.org/mirrors.html for a list of FTP mirrors
-    and use them if possible.
+    Contact
+    -------
 
-    To avoid possible legal problems we have decided, not to use
-    the normal www.gnu.org webserver.
+    See the file AUTHORS.
 
-    Please direct bug reports to <gnupg-bugs@gnu.org> or post
-    them direct to the mailing list <gnupg-devel@gnupg.org>.
-    Please direct questions about GnuPG to the users mailing list or
-    one of the pgp newsgroups and give me more time to improve
-    GnuPG.  Commercial support for GnuPG is also available; please
-    see the GNU service directory or search other resources.
+    Commercial grade support for Libgcrypt is available; please see
+    http://www.gnupg.org/service.html .
 
-    Have fun and remember: Echelon is looking at you kid.
 
+  This file is Free Software; as a special exception the authors gives
+  unlimited permission to copy and/or distribute it, with or without
+  modifications, as long as this notice is preserved. For conditions
+  of the whole package, please see the file COPYING.  This file is
+  distributed in the hope that it will be useful, but WITHOUT ANY
+  WARRANTY, to the extent permitted by law; without even the implied
+  warranty of MERCHANTABILITY or FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE.