See ChangeLog: Fri Apr 9 12:26:25 CEST 1999 Werner Koch
authorWerner Koch <wk@gnupg.org>
Fri, 9 Apr 1999 10:34:43 +0000 (10:34 +0000)
committerWerner Koch <wk@gnupg.org>
Fri, 9 Apr 1999 10:34:43 +0000 (10:34 +0000)
README
cipher/ChangeLog
cipher/blowfish.c
cipher/cipher.c
cipher/twofish.c
src/gcrypt.h

diff --git a/README b/README
index 75c769d..2d02f52 100644 (file)
--- a/README
+++ b/README
@@ -1,18 +1,17 @@
 Please note that this is only a bug fix release and some things
 do not yet work - see TODO for parts which are problematic
 
-The genkey1024 test will fail due to an expect problem :-(
 
 
 -----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----
 
-                    GnuPG - The GNU Privacy Guard
-                   -------------------------------
-                            Version 0.9
+                   GnuPG - The GNU Privacy Guard
+                  -------------------------------
+                           Version 0.9
 
     GnuPG is now in Beta test and you should report all bugs to the
     mailing list (see below).  The 0.9.x versions are released mainly
-    to fix all remaining serious bugs.  As soon as version 1.0 is out,
+    to fix all remaining serious bugs. As soon as version 1.0 is out,
     development will continue with a 1.1 series and bug fixes for the
     1.0 version as needed.
 
@@ -32,7 +31,7 @@ The genkey1024 test will fail due to an expect problem :-(
     "Key fingerprint = ECAF 7590 EB34 43B5 C7CF  3ACB 6C7E E1B8 621C C013"
 
     You may want add my new DSA key to your GnuPG pubring and use it in
-    the future to verify new releases.  Because you verified this README
+    the future to verify new releases. Because you verified this README
     file and _checked_that_it_is_really_my PGP2 key 0C9857A5, you can be
     sure that the above fingerprints are correct.
 
@@ -67,7 +66,7 @@ The genkey1024 test will fail due to an expect problem :-(
 
     Here is a quick summary:
 
-    1)  "./configure"
+    1) "./configure"
 
     2) "make"
 
@@ -93,7 +92,7 @@ The genkey1024 test will fail due to an expect problem :-(
 
     The normal way to create a key is
 
-        gpg --gen-key
+       gpg --gen-key
 
     This asks some questions and then starts key generation. To create
     good random numbers for the key parameters, GnuPG needs to gather
@@ -120,7 +119,7 @@ The genkey1024 test will fail due to an expect problem :-(
     Next, you should create a revocation certificate in case someone
     gets knowledge of your secret key or you forgot your passphrase
 
-        gpg --gen-revoke your_user_id
+       gpg --gen-revoke your_user_id
 
     Run this command and store the revocation certificate away.  The output
     is always ASCII armored, so that you can print it and (hopefully
@@ -128,20 +127,20 @@ The genkey1024 test will fail due to an expect problem :-(
 
     Now you can use your key to create digital signatures
 
-        gpg -s file
+       gpg -s file
 
     This creates a file "file.gpg" which is compressed and has a
     signature attached.
 
-        gpg -sa file
+       gpg -sa file
 
     Same as above, but creates a file "file.asc" which is ASCII armored
-    and and ready for sending by mail.  It is better to use your
+    and and ready for sending by mail. It is better to use your
     mailers features to create signatures (The mailer uses GnuPG to do
     this) because the mailer has the ability to MIME encode such
     signatures - but this is not a security issue.
 
-        gpg -s -o out file
+       gpg -s -o out file
 
     Creates a signature of "file", but writes the output to the file
     "out".
@@ -150,7 +149,7 @@ The genkey1024 test will fail due to an expect problem :-(
     your key by putting it on a key server, a web page or in your .plan
     file) is now able to check whether you really signed this text
 
-        gpg --verify file
+       gpg --verify file
 
     GnuPG now checks whether the signature is valid and prints an
     appropriate message.  If the signature is good, you know at least
@@ -161,29 +160,29 @@ The genkey1024 test will fail due to an expect problem :-(
     create a new file that is identical to the original.  gpg can also
     run as a filter, so that you can pipe data to verify trough it
 
-        cat signed-file | gpg | wc -l
+       cat signed-file | gpg | wc -l
 
     which will check the signature of signed-file and then display the
     number of lines in the original file.
 
     To send a message encrypted to someone you can use
 
-        gpg -e -r heine file
+       gpg -e -r heine file
 
     This encrypts "file" with the public key of the user "heine" and
     writes it to "file.gpg"
 
-        echo "hello" | gpg -ea -r heine | mail heine
+       echo "hello" | gpg -ea -r heine | mail heine
 
     Ditto, but encrypts "hello\n" and mails it as ASCII armored message
     to the user with the mail address heine.
 
-        gpg -se -r heine file
+       gpg -se -r heine file
 
     This encrypts "file" with the public key of "heine" and writes it
     to "file.gpg" after signing it with your user id.
 
-        gpg -se -r heine -u Suttner file
+       gpg -se -r heine -u Suttner file
 
     Ditto, but sign the file with your alternative user id "Suttner"
 
@@ -191,7 +190,7 @@ The genkey1024 test will fail due to an expect problem :-(
     GnuPG has some options to help you publish public keys.  This is
     called "exporting" a key, thus
 
-        gpg --export >all-my-keys
+       gpg --export >all-my-keys
 
     exports all the keys in the keyring and writes them (in a binary
     format) to "all-my-keys".  You may then mail "all-my-keys" as an
@@ -202,14 +201,14 @@ The genkey1024 test will fail due to an expect problem :-(
     To mail a public key or put it on a web page you have to create
     the key in ASCII armored format
 
-        gpg --export --armor | mail panther@tiger.int
+       gpg --export --armor | mail panther@tiger.int
 
     This will send all your public keys to your friend panther.
 
     If you have received a key from someone else you can put it
     into your public keyring.  This is called "importing"
 
-        gpg --import [filenames]
+       gpg --import [filenames]
 
     New keys are appended to your keyring and already existing
     keys are updated. Note that GnuPG does not import keys that
@@ -223,7 +222,7 @@ The genkey1024 test will fail due to an expect problem :-(
     every other program used for management of cryptographic keys)
     provides other solutions.
 
-        gpg --fingerprint <username>
+       gpg --fingerprint <username>
 
     prints the so called "fingerprint" of the given username which
     is a sequence of hex bytes (which you may have noticed in mail
@@ -237,43 +236,43 @@ The genkey1024 test will fail due to an expect problem :-(
     Suppose however that friend of yours knows someone who knows someone
     who has met the owner of the public key at some computer conference.
     Suppose that all the people between you and the public key holder
-    may now act as introducers to you.  Introducers signing keys thereby
+    may now act as introducers to you. Introducers signing keys thereby
     certify that they know the owner of the keys they sign.  If you then
     trust all the introducers to have correctly signed other keys, you
     can be be sure that the other key really belongs to the one who
     claims to own it..
 
     There are 2 steps to validate a key:
-        1. First check that there is a complete chain
-           of signed keys from the public key you want to use
-           and your key and verify each signature.
-        2. Make sure that you have full trust in the certificates
-           of all the introduces between the public key holder and
-           you.
+       1. First check that there is a complete chain
+          of signed keys from the public key you want to use
+          and your key and verify each signature.
+       2. Make sure that you have full trust in the certificates
+          of all the introduces between the public key holder and
+          you.
     Step 2 is the more complicated part because there is no easy way
     for a computer to decide who is trustworthy and who is not.  GnuPG
     leaves this decision to you and will ask you for a trust value
     (here also referenced as the owner-trust of a key) for every key
-    needed to check the chain of certificates.  You may choose from:
+    needed to check the chain of certificates. You may choose from:
       a) "I don't know" - then it is not possible to use any
-         of the chains of certificates, in which this key is used
-         as an introducer, to validate the target key.  Use this if
-         you don't know the introducer.
+        of the chains of certificates, in which this key is used
+        as an introducer, to validate the target key.  Use this if
+        you don't know the introducer.
       b) "I do not trust" - Use this if you know that the introducer
-         does not do a good job in certifying other keys.  The effect
-         is the same as with a) but for a) you may later want to
-         change the value because you got new information about this
-         introducer.
+        does not do a good job in certifying other keys.  The effect
+        is the same as with a) but for a) you may later want to
+        change the value because you got new information about this
+        introducer.
       c) "I trust marginally" - Use this if you assume that the
-         introducer knows what he is doing.  Together with some
-         other marginally trusted keys, GnuPG validates the target
-         key then as good.
+        introducer knows what he is doing.  Together with some
+        other marginally trusted keys, GnuPG validates the target
+        key then as good.
       d) "I fully trust" - Use this if you really know that this
-         introducer does a good job when certifying other keys.
-         If all the introducer are of this trust value, GnuPG
-         normally needs only one chain of signatures to validate
-         a target key okay. (But this may be adjusted with the help
-         of some options).
+        introducer does a good job when certifying other keys.
+        If all the introducer are of this trust value, GnuPG
+        normally needs only one chain of signatures to validate
+        a target key okay. (But this may be adjusted with the help
+        of some options).
     This information is confidential because it gives your personal
     opinion on the trustworthiness of someone else.  Therefore this data
     is not stored in the keyring but in the "trustdb"
@@ -286,7 +285,7 @@ The genkey1024 test will fail due to an expect problem :-(
     Okay, here is how GnuPG helps you with key management.  Most stuff
     is done with the --edit-key command
 
-        gpg --edit-key <keyid or username>
+       gpg --edit-key <keyid or username>
 
     GnuPG displays some information about the key and then prompts
     for a command (enter "help" to see a list of commands and see
@@ -326,37 +325,37 @@ The genkey1024 test will fail due to an expect problem :-(
 
     * Only by the short keyid (prepend a zero if it begins with A..F):
 
-        "234567C4"
-        "0F34E556E"
-        "01347A56A"
-        "0xAB123456
+       "234567C4"
+       "0F34E556E"
+       "01347A56A"
+       "0xAB123456
 
     * By a complete keyid:
 
-        "234AABBCC34567C4"
-        "0F323456784E56EAB"
-        "01AB3FED1347A5612"
-        "0x234AABBCC34567C4"
+       "234AABBCC34567C4"
+       "0F323456784E56EAB"
+       "01AB3FED1347A5612"
+       "0x234AABBCC34567C4"
 
     * By a fingerprint:
 
-        "1234343434343434C434343434343434"
-        "123434343434343C3434343434343734349A3434"
-        "0E12343434343434343434EAB3484343434343434"
+       "1234343434343434C434343434343434"
+       "123434343434343C3434343434343734349A3434"
+       "0E12343434343434343434EAB3484343434343434"
 
       The first one is MD5 the others are ripemd160 or sha1.
 
     * By an exact string:
 
-        "=Heinrich Heine <heinrichh@uni-duesseldorf.de>"
+       "=Heinrich Heine <heinrichh@uni-duesseldorf.de>"
 
     * By an email address:
 
-        "<heinrichh@uni-duesseldorf.de>"
+       "<heinrichh@uni-duesseldorf.de>"
 
     * By word match
 
-        "+Heinrich Heine duesseldorf"
+       "+Heinrich Heine duesseldorf"
 
       All words must match excatly (not case sensitive) and appear in
       any order in the user ID.  Words are any sequences of letters,
@@ -364,15 +363,15 @@ The genkey1024 test will fail due to an expect problem :-(
 
     * By the Local ID (from the trust DB):
 
-        "#34"
+       "#34"
 
       This may be used by a MUA to specify an exact key after selecting
       a key from GnuPG (by using a special option or an extra utility)
 
     * Or by the usual substring:
 
-        "Heine"
-        "*Heine"
+       "Heine"
+       "*Heine"
 
       The '*' indicates substring search explicitly.
 
@@ -400,22 +399,22 @@ The genkey1024 test will fail due to an expect problem :-(
     Esoteric commands
     -----------------
 
-        gpg --list-packets datafile
+       gpg --list-packets datafile
 
     Use this to list the contents of a data file. If the file is encrypted
     you are asked for the passphrase, so that GnuPG is able to look at the
     inner structure of a encrypted packet.  This command should list all
     kinds of rfc2440 messages.
 
-        gpgm --list-trustdb
+       gpgm --list-trustdb
 
     List the contents of the trust DB in a human readable format
 
-        gpgm --list-trustdb  <usernames>
+       gpgm --list-trustdb  <usernames>
 
     List the tree of certificates for the given usernames
 
-        gpgm --list-trust-path  username
+       gpgm --list-trust-path  username
 
     List the possible trust paths for the given username. The length
     of such a trust path is limited by the option --max-cert-depth
index 4ecdbc4..9b16f12 100644 (file)
@@ -1,3 +1,11 @@
+Fri Apr  9 12:26:25 CEST 1999  Werner Koch  <wk@isil.d.shuttle.de>
+
+       * cipher.c (cipher_open): Reversed the changes for AUTO_CFB.
+
+       * blowfish.c: Dropped the Blowfish 160 mode.
+       * cipher.c (cipher_open): Ditto.
+       (setup_cipher_table): Ditto.  And removed support of twofish128
+
 Wed Apr  7 20:51:39 CEST 1999  Werner Koch  <wk@isil.d.shuttle.de>
 
        * random.c (get_random_bits): Can now handle requests > POOLSIZE
index 8bfce67..5a829d4 100644 (file)
@@ -42,7 +42,6 @@
 
 
 #define CIPHER_ALGO_BLOWFISH    4  /* blowfish 128 bit key */
-#define CIPHER_ALGO_BLOWFISH160 42  /* blowfish 160 bit key (not in OpenPGP)*/
 
 #define FNCCAST_SETKEY(f)  (int(*)(void*, byte*, unsigned))(f)
 #define FNCCAST_CRYPT(f)   (void(*)(void*, byte*, byte*))(f)
@@ -582,7 +581,7 @@ blowfish_get_info( int algo, size_t *keylen,
                   void (**r_decrypt)( void *c, byte *outbuf, byte *inbuf )
                 )
 {
-    *keylen = algo == CIPHER_ALGO_BLOWFISH ? 128 : 160;
+    *keylen = 128;
     *blocksize = BLOWFISH_BLOCKSIZE;
     *contextsize = sizeof(BLOWFISH_context);
     *r_setkey = FNCCAST_SETKEY(bf_setkey);
@@ -591,8 +590,6 @@ blowfish_get_info( int algo, size_t *keylen,
 
     if( algo == CIPHER_ALGO_BLOWFISH )
        return "BLOWFISH";
-    if( algo == CIPHER_ALGO_BLOWFISH160 )
-       return "BLOWFISH160";
     return NULL;
 }
 
index 0306c37..cba011b 100644 (file)
@@ -127,28 +127,6 @@ setup_cipher_table(void)
     if( !cipher_table[i].name )
        BUG();
     i++;
-    cipher_table[i].algo = CIPHER_ALGO_BLOWFISH160;
-    cipher_table[i].name = blowfish_get_info( cipher_table[i].algo,
-                                        &cipher_table[i].keylen,
-                                        &cipher_table[i].blocksize,
-                                        &cipher_table[i].contextsize,
-                                        &cipher_table[i].setkey,
-                                        &cipher_table[i].encrypt,
-                                        &cipher_table[i].decrypt     );
-    if( !cipher_table[i].name )
-       BUG();
-    i++;
-    cipher_table[i].algo = CIPHER_ALGO_TWOFISH_OLD;
-    cipher_table[i].name = twofish_get_info( cipher_table[i].algo,
-                                        &cipher_table[i].keylen,
-                                        &cipher_table[i].blocksize,
-                                        &cipher_table[i].contextsize,
-                                        &cipher_table[i].setkey,
-                                        &cipher_table[i].encrypt,
-                                        &cipher_table[i].decrypt     );
-    if( !cipher_table[i].name )
-       BUG();
-    i++;
     cipher_table[i].algo = CIPHER_ALGO_DUMMY;
     cipher_table[i].name = "DUMMY";
     cipher_table[i].blocksize = 8;
@@ -362,8 +340,7 @@ cipher_open( int algo, int mode, int secure )
     if( algo == CIPHER_ALGO_DUMMY )
        hd->mode = CIPHER_MODE_DUMMY;
     else if( mode == CIPHER_MODE_AUTO_CFB ) {
-       if( hd->blocksize > 8
-           || algo == CIPHER_ALGO_BLOWFISH160 || algo >= 100 )
+       if( algo >= 100 )
            hd->mode = CIPHER_MODE_CFB;
        else
            hd->mode = CIPHER_MODE_PHILS_CFB;
index 94a31de..6ab5eba 100644 (file)
@@ -2,6 +2,9 @@
  * By Matthew Skala <mskala@ansuz.sooke.bc.ca>, July 26, 1998
  * 256-bit key length added March 20, 1999
  *
+ * The original author has disclaimed all copyright interest in this
+ * code and thus putting it in the public domain.
+ *
  * This code is a "clean room" implementation, written from the paper
  * _Twofish: A 128-Bit Block Cipher_ by Bruce Schneier, John Kelsey,
  * Doug Whiting, David Wagner, Chris Hall, and Niels Ferguson, available
index 285fc28..3d301d1 100644 (file)
@@ -207,7 +207,7 @@ typedef struct gcry_md_context *GCRY_MD_HD;
 
 enum gcry_md_algos {
     GCRY_MD_NONE    = 0,
-    GCRY_MD_MD5            = 1,
+    GCRY_MD_MD5     = 1,
     GCRY_MD_SHA1    = 2,
     GCRY_MD_RMD160  = 3,
     GCRY_MD_TIGER   = 6
@@ -273,13 +273,12 @@ void g10_log_mpidump( const char *text, MPI a );
 #define CIPHER_ALGO_BLOWFISH    4  /* blowfish 128 bit key */
 #define CIPHER_ALGO_SAFER_SK128  5
 #define CIPHER_ALGO_DES_SK      6
-#define CIPHER_ALGO_BLOWFISH160 42  /* blowfish 160 bit key (not in OpenPGP)*/
 #define CIPHER_ALGO_DUMMY      110  /* no encryption at all */
 
 #define PUBKEY_ALGO_RSA        1
 #define PUBKEY_ALGO_RSA_E      2     /* RSA encrypt only */
 #define PUBKEY_ALGO_RSA_S      3     /* RSA sign only */
-#define PUBKEY_ALGO_ELGAMAL_E 16     /* encrypt only ElGamal (but not vor v3)*/
+#define PUBKEY_ALGO_ELGAMAL_E 16     /* encrypt only ElGamal (but not for v3)*/
 #define PUBKEY_ALGO_DSA       17
 #define PUBKEY_ALGO_ELGAMAL   20     /* sign and encrypt elgamal */